English PREPARATION AND EVALUATION OF NANOCLAY COMPOSITES MODIFIED WITH SOME POLYMERIC COMPOUNDS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS In the present work we prepared some monomeric thiol surfactants namely (6-(3-amino phenoxy) hexane-1-thiol, 8-(3-amino phenoxy) octane-1-thiol, 10-(3-amino phenoxy) decane-1-thiol, and their polymers with nano composite gold and using as catalyst of methmethylacaryte. The chemical structure of the monomeric surfactants was confirmed using FTIR and1HNMR spectroscopic analysis. The chemical structure of the polymeric surfactants was confirmed using FTIR, TGA, DSC and XRD analysis. Gold nanoparticles colloidal solution was prepared. The self assembling of these synthesized surfactants on gold nanoparticles was investigated. The self-assembling of these surfactants on gold nanoparticles was characterized using different techniques such as UV spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Electron Diffraction (ED) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The effect of the selfassembling of these surfactants on the stabilization of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was studied using TEM images. The growth of the gold nanoparticles was investigated with respect to the increase in the alkyl chain of the synthesized thiol surfactants. The effect of gold nanoparticles as catalyst, and comparison between different nano compound and their activity. The results show that the gold nanoparticles have the ability to effect on the behavior and mechanism of the bulk polymerization methyl meth acrayte (PMMA) . Also, we made different analysis for (PMMA) such as 1HNMR and GPC ,through these analysis we could obtain a good results about different catalyst which has been used . So, we can work with the same point if you like with different application Many idea :- First, Using some molecules of water dehydrate through nano -capillary tube to cancer cell . Second , working on some compounds used for treatment Third, some idea for synthesis some polymeric material for used in medical capsules . fourth ,Vaccination of modified nano-sized stem cells by some material to cancer cell . Fives , preparation of nano-composite material coated by Au particle applied for remedy cancer disease . Six,Preparation of screen material in nano- sized work as screening and separated toxic material on it is surface SUMMARY Nanotechnology encompasses numerous fields of the natural sciences - broadly speaking anything with a dimension under 100nm can be termed 'nanostructured' and these days it also seems that anything that fit that definition will be termed nanostructured. The vision of nanotechnology to control matter on the atomic scale both provides hopes for huge technological advances providing cures for diseases and high increases in the performance of the technology we use around us - and on the other hand,scares us with still rather unknown health effects of many new types of nanoparticles and science fiction style 'Nanites' that will reproduce and take over the world. 'Nanites' seems a very distant possiblity - and before anyone would even come close to create anything 'nano' that could reproduce in a very controlled environment, technology itself will probably have started moving in quite a new direction for a new 'aera'. This opensource handbook on nanoscience and nanotechnology is divided into sections that each deal with a 'field' of nanotechnology and describes this in greater detail as you go into subsections � Part 1: INTRODUCTION – Giving a general overview A vision, in 1959, Richard Feynman discussed the possibility of manipulating and controlling things on a molecular scale in order to achieve electronic and mechanical systems with atomic sized components. He concluded that the development of technologies to construct such small systems would be interdisciplinary, combining fields such as physics, chemistry and biology, and would offer a new world of possibilities that could radically change the technology around us. A few years later, in 1965, Moore noted that the number of transistors on a chip had roughly doubled every other year since 1959, and predicted that the trend was likely to hold as each new generation of microsystems would help to develop the next generation at lower prices and with smaller components. To date, the semiconductor industry has been able to fulfill Moore'sLaw. The impact on society and our lives of the continuous downscaling of systems is profound, and continues to open up new frontiers and possibilities. However, no exponential growth can continue forever, and the semiconductor industry will eventually reach the atomic limit for downsizing the transistor. Today, as that limit still seems to be some 20 years in the future, the growth is beginning to take new directions, indicating that the atomic limit might not be the limiting factor for technological development in the future, because systems are becoming more diverse and because new effects appear when the systems become so small that quantum effects dominate. The semiconductor devices show an increased diversification, dividing for instance processors into very different systems such as those for cheap disposable chips, low power consumption portable devices, or high processing power devices. Microfabrication is also merging with other branches of science to include for instance chemical and optical micro systems. In addition, microbiology and biochemistry is becoming important for applications of all the developing methods. This diversity seems to be increasing on all levels in technology and many of these cross-disciplinary developments are linked to nanotechnology. The visions of Feynman are today shared by many others: when nanotechnology is seen as a general cross disciplinary technology, it has the potential to create a coming "industrial" revolution that will have a major impact on society and everyday life, comparable or exceeding the impact of electricity and information technology. On the other hand , we discussed Surfactant-stabilized AuNPs Surfactants provide various assemblies at the nanoscale such as micelles in aqueous solutions, reverse micelles (water-in-oil and oil-in-water microemulsions), vesicles, and liquid crystals. Therefore, NPs can be synthesized, sized, and shaped by using surfactants as templates in the presence or in the absence of thiol ligands (Chen; 2000; and Jana; 2001). Self Assembling of thiols on metal nanoparticles , Recent years have witnessed an exponential growth in fundamental and applied studies of metal nanoparticles with size- and shape-dependent properties ( Roduner; 2006 ). The readily available methods of surface functionalization, in particular by the chemisorption of organic thiols on gold to produce monolayer-protected nanoparticles. The end of this chapter , we gave some knowledge about Claymineral-Polymer Interaction and Structures, Clay Polymer Nanocomposite Preparation of Claymeniral–Polymer Nanocomposite(Direct Intercalation from Solution or Melt, In Situ Polymerisation and Template Synthesis) and their properties (Mechanical Properties of clay polymer nanocomposites, Fire Retardancy and Thermal Properties of clay polymer nanocomposites , Thermal Stability , Expansion , Electrical and Electrochemical Properties ). CHAPTER TWO: EXPERMENTAL This chapter comprises all chemical used in this work, experimental methods of the :- 1-Synthesis of the monomeric thiol surfactants (MC6, MC8 and MC10) 2- Synthesis of 3-bromoalkyloxy aniline 3- Synthesis of 3-mercaptoalkyloxy anilines 4- Synthesis of the polymeric thiol surfactants (PC6, PC8, and PC10) 5- Preparation of the gold nanoparticles. 6- Preparation of the nanostructure of the polymeric thiol surfactant with the Gold nanoparticles 7- Preparation of clay nanopowder 8- Fabrication of the nanoclay composite with AuNPs 9- Fabrication of the nanoclay composite with nanostructure of the synthesized polymeric surfactants (PC6-PC10) assembled on AuNPs. 10- Bulk polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA). 11- Characterization techniques by different tools such as Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1HNMR), X-Ray diffraction measurements (XRD), Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA DSC), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)and Characterization of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA),conversion %in (O2 and N2 atmosphere) and tacticity . Chapter three: RESULTS AND DISCUSSION:- This chapter is divided into four sections. In Section 1, the chemical structure conformation of the synthesized polymeric thiol surfactants was discussed. The self assembling of the synthesized polymeric thiol surfactants on gold nanoparticles was investigated in section 2. In Section 3, the fabrication of the nanoclay composite using the synthesized polymeric thiol surfactants and gold nanoparticles was studied. In addition, in Section 4 the application of the fabricated nanoclay composite as catalyst for bulk polymerization of metyl methacryalite was investigated. He displays impressive logical thinking abilities and an intellectual curiosity beyond that of his peers , extremely hard-working and truly insightful; these two traits combine to produce an especially unique and outstanding student 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2017 University of Toronto – Toronto Ontario Pierre Sullivan 0 1 null English Multimorphisms and fractional multimorphisms of functions In most of the studied versions of the (counting) constraint satisfaction problem some kind of algebraic invariants play a very significant role in determining the problem's computational complexity. These invariants are known as polymorphisms, multimorphisms, fractional polymorphisms, etc. There are reasons to believe that similar invariants exist for approximation of the weighted counting constraint satisfaction problem. While there are several candidates for this role, such as multimorphisms, fractional polymorphisms, properties of Fourier coefficients, no definite result has been obtained so far. The project will include collecting a substantial amount of examples of various functions and morphisms that preserve them in order to understand which morphisms better fit for the purpose, and what is expressive power of different types of morphisms. In particular, a large number of computational experiments will be conducted to separate, using morphisms, several well known examples of functions. The constraint satisfaction problem} provides a general framework in which it is possible to express, in a natural way, a wide variety of problems. The aim in a constraint satisfaction problem is to find an assignment of values to a given set of variables, subject to constraints on the values which can be simultaneously assigned to certain specified subsets of variables; in the counting constraint problem the objective is to find the number of such assignments. A large variety of problems in artificial intelligence and computer science can be viewed as special cases of the constraint satisfaction and counting problems. Some examples are evaluation of conjunctive queries from database theory, scheduling, image-processing, and frequency assignment problems, learnability of generalized formulas, the classic satisfiability problem from propositional logic, and many problems from graph theory, including the colorability problem, certain problems in statistical physics. Constraint satisfaction and constraint programming have been recognized by ACM as a strategic direction in development of computer science and artificial intelligence. Growing interest in the study of constraints and the importance of their applications have led to the establishment of the Constraint International Journal and an annual international conference on Constraint Programming. New programming languages for tackling constraint problems and various constraint solvers are being developed. Constraint problems are intensively studied from both, theoretical and practical perspectives. From the practical perspective, a principal research goal in this area is to design efficient algorithms solving constraint problems. However, solving constraint satisfaction and related problems in full generality is difficult, as these problems are NP-hard. This means that it is very unlikely that there exist efficient general-purpose algorithms. Thus one can try to design general algorithms which perform well on certain randomly-generated instances or on naturally occurring benchmark problems, or else to develop specialized algorithms that perform well on particular restricted constraint problems arising from applications. In the theoretical study of constrained problems, the central research goal is a classification of such problems according to their complexity and particular types of solution algorithms. Complexity classifications for various versions of constraint satisfaction and counting problems have attracted much attention in the recent years because these classifications represent a reasonably accurate bird's eye view of computational complexity and the equivalence classes it has created. The concept that unifies the two sides of constraint problems is the concept of restricted problems.Identifying restrictions on the general problem that are sufficient to ensure tractability can provide considerable assistance in improving practical constraint solvers. Huge progress has been achieved during the last decade in developing general methods of solving constraint problems. These methods use various heuristics and randomized algorithms to generate a solution of a problem. Polynomial time algorithms for restricted problems can significantly speed up such general-purpose methods by improving the heuristics involved. Another possible strategy is to attempt to manipulate and decompose constraint problems during the solution process so that they are reduced to tractable cases. Restricted constraint problems often turn out to be equivalent to known combinatorial problems, and thus provide a more general unifying framework that can expand our intuition about `natural' combinatorial problems. In many cases the constraint approach suggests a better understanding of algorithmic ideas behind combinatorial problems by showing that one of the very few constraint algorithms, or a combination thereof, is capable of solving the problem. Using different formalisms for restricted constraint problems we can view a combinatorial problem from different angles. Counting constraint problems. Counting problems in which the objective is to count the number of `solutions' were first introduced Valiant in 1979. A first systematic study of counting constraint problems was undertaken Creignou, where a dichotomy theorem was obtained, establishing that any counting constraint problem over the set {0,1} is either polynomial time solvable or NP-hard. Since then much work has been done on the complexity of counting problems, culminating in a dichotomy theorem for arbitrary counting constraint problems by Bulatov. Related to counting constraint problems are the questions concerning homomorphism density and `real conjunctive queries'. Weighted counting constraint problems, in which every solution is counted towards the total sum with a certain weight, generalizes counting constraint problems, and also include a range of new applications. In particular, partition functions that have been studied in statistical physics for more than a century is a particular case of the weighted counting constraint problem. Weighted problems and partition functions particularly have attracted considerable amount of attention recently. If the weights assigned to solutions are rational non-negative, the dichotomy result for counting constraint problems implies a similar dichotomy for weighted problems. An alternative approach that allows to tackle problems with negative and even complex weights was suggested Cai et al.; it uses holographic reductions to obtain hardness results. The holographic approach can also be applied to an even more general so-called Holant problems. Another rich research direction related to counting and weighted constraint problems is approximation of solutions to such problems. Counting problems exibit a wider range of different complexities with respect to approximation. However, a complete classification of approximation complexity have been obtained for Boolean constraints. The student will, first, read some relevant literature to understand the context of the specific project. This will include several papers on counting constraint satisfaction problem and its weighted variant, 1-2 papers on Galois correspondence, and certain amount of related materials that may be needed for the project. Then the student will develop code to test various properties of functions, and enumerating such properties to identify the right ones. Finally, the student will run experiments for various types of morphism and functions. General mathematical background is strongly required, as well as the ability to read and understand research texts in mathematics. Also good programming skills and the knowledge of several most popular programming languages is needed. 1 May, 2015 1 August, 2015 Simon Fraser University – Burnaby British Columbia Andrei Bulatov 0 0 null English Direct georeferencing of unmanned aerial vehicle photography and radar imagery with a low-cost real-time kinematic GPS. The conventional (indirect) georeferencing of remote sensing imagery requires the use of control points that link known positions in the imagery to known positions in map coordinates. The number of control points depends on the amount of distortion in the imagery, method of transformation and desired level of accuracy, but it is often large. Overall, the collection of ground control points is a cumbersome and time-consuming operation, and almost an unrealistic one when it comes to the georeferencing and mosaicking of a set of images acquired from a small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Indeed, small UAVs are typically flown below 400 feet above ground level and can rapidly collect an enormous amount of high-resolution images when mapping an area (i.e. over 500 images for every square kilometer). The number of necessary ground control points can be substantially reduced using a direct georeferencing, an approach that is obviously better suited for UAV mapping projects. Direct georeferencing requires a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) to directly measure the position and orientation of the imaging sensors on a remote sensing system in order to georeference their data. These are integral components of a UAV navigation system and the information they collect can, incidentally, be used for direct image georeferencing. At Athabasca University, we have assembled several small UAVs, ranging from multicopters and EPP-foam airplanes with limited flight time (1 hour) and payload weight (up to 2 kg) to larger fixed-wing aircrafts with extended endurance (6+ hours) and payload capability (up to 10 kg). We are using these UAVs for tracking springtime snowmelt timing and spatial patterns, monitoring the impact of climate change on permafrost landscapes in Nordic communities, and soil moisture mapping. The Summer 2015 research project will consist in equipping our UAVs with a low-cost ($150), lightweight real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS system, the NavSpark-Raw, and assessing its performance in achieving highly accurate direct georeferencing of UAV photography and radar imagery. The Navspark-Raw is an-Arduino-compatible board with onboard GNSS that can send out carrier phase raw measurements to a host computer to be applied RTK corrections in order to generate positions with centimeter-level accuracy. On several occasions throughout the summer, our smallest UAVs will be deployed over an experimental acreage located approximately 150 km west of Edmonton (Alberta), to test the RTK GPS/INS system and verify the positioning accuracy with and without ground control points. Supervisor: Frederique Pivot (PhD) Dr. Pivot’s background and research is both in physical geography and geospatial technologies. Dr. Pivot grew up in Montpellier, France, on the shore of the Mediterranean Sea. There, she completed her undergraduate studies in Geography of Mediterranean and Tropical Regions, at University Paul Valéry. Since her early childhood, Dr. Pivot devoted great passion to Polar Regions which largely influenced her career choice and coming to Canada in the 1990s. Dr. Pivot’s graduate and post-graduate research was related to applied remote sensing, climatology/hydrology, cryospheric science, modeling and improvement of field measurement methods of cryospheric components. In 2000, Dr. Pivot received the PhD degree in Physical Analysis of Geographical Environments, Natural Resources and Risks from the University of Sciences and Technologies of Lille, France. Her thesis work focused on using multisensory data, especially active and passive microwave remotely-sensed data (ground-based and spaceborne sensors), to retrieve snow cover characteristics and monitor their spatio-temporal variability in the boreal forest-tundra ecotone of northern Manitoba, Canada. Dr. Pivot joined Athabasca University in 2006, as a full-time Assistant Professor in Physical Geography and Remote Sensing. Her specialized research areas are in: 1) Remote sensing and geoscience: developing enhanced observing systems capabilities (technology and algorithms) for monitoring the spatio-temporal dynamics of various Earth’s surface parameters and processes. Dr. Pivot is currently looking into multi-stage remote sensing approaches, using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in particular. 2) Distance education: finding technological ways to innovate the teaching and learning of physical geography online (i.e. mobile-technology guided fieldtrips and virtual geographical environments). Co-supervisor: Qing Tan (PhD) Dr. Tan’s background is in aviation navigation, control engineering, computer science, and computer information systems. Dr. Tan grew up in Chengdu, China. As a Northwest Polytechnic University undergraduate (Xi’an, China), he majored in Gyroscopic and Inertial Navigation. Before his PhD degree, Dr. Tan worked for a few years on the development of navigation systems for the Chinese Aviation industry. Dr. Tan conducted his PhD research at the Norwegian Institute of Technology in Trondheim, Norway on Robotics and Anthropomorphic Robot Teleoperation. He then performed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Japan Atom Energy Research Institute in Tokai. Dr. Tan’s post-doctoral research was on the use of Virtual Reality technology to telepresent a human operator in a nuclear facility. After he came to Canada, Dr. Tan worked in the IT industry for over ten years. He developed many software applications and provided system integration services to a wide range of companies and industries. Through this professional experience, Dr. Tan developed strong expertise in GPS, DGPS, Cellular Network Positioning, airship surveying systems, enterprise document management systems, enterprise online transaction systems, mobile commercial applications, video monitoring and security systems, GPS tracking and fleet management systems. Dr. Tan joined Athabasca University in 2007. His research interests include Location-Based Technologies, Mobile Computing and Technologies, Mobile Learning, Adaptive Mobile Learning and Commerce, Wireless Sensor Networks, Computer Network and Cyber Security, Enterprise Modeling and Information Management Systems, and Telepresence Robots. Since his return to the academic career, Dr. Tan has been program committee member, reviewer, and guest editor of international conferences and journals and has been invited to give research talks at various universities. He has also published and presented his research on location-aware technologies for mobile learning in wide range of international conferences and journals. Your role will consist in: 1) Conducting a literature review on direct georeferencing systems/high-resolution UAV imagery. 2) Participating in fieldwork and: - helping with UAV mission planning (e.g. fabrication/installation of aerial targets for georeferencing purposes, preflight inspection of the UAV systems, flight planning and simulation); - helping deploy the UAVs in the field and operate them, especially by assisting the pilot in the duties associated with collision avoidance (i.e. UAV ground observer). 3) Assembling the RTK GPS system; compiling the RTK library on a PC/Windows and a Raspberry Pi microcomputer; evaluating the performance of the system. Skills/background in Geoinformatics/Geomatics or Computer Science/Computing Engineering is required to work on this project. Knowledge of Global Navigation Satellite Systems, C/C++ programming language, and microcomputers is essential. Experience with remote sensing software suites (e.g. Geomatica-PCI Geomatics; ENVI-Excelis VIS, ERDAS Imagine) and radio-controlled (model) aircraft and/or unmanned aerial vehicles is an asset, but not a requirement as training with these will be provided during the internship. 15 May, 2015 1 August, 2015 University of Alberta – Edmonton Alberta Frederique Pivot 0 0 null English Data Analytics and Visualization for Social Media The exponential increase in social media textual data creates enormous challenges to read and interpret text. Twitter has grown from delivering 65 million tweets per day to over 200 million in 1 year. Facebook has 800 million users (each with ~130 friends). Over half the users visit Facebook daily. Of active Internet users, 77% read blogs. These rapidly growing forms of communication have society struggling to understand and exploit. Online social media (Twitter, Facebook ...) allow readers to express thought/opinions on content. Media publications have added opinion blog commentary to provide readers' opportunity to share comments. Editorial/business leaders see value in audience communication and appreciate that learning aspects such as emotional tone influence their offerings, contributors and readers. Discovering emotion in text can positively impact sales, investment, and provide a deeper knowledge of the influence different authors have on the public. We will develop methods and tools that discern meaning from social media text. We will identify the emotional content within text and develop tools to better understand emotions found in a social media text, and develop new tools for media users to shape emotional content and respond to others. Application of such methods and tools are limitless. Business relies on direct consumer dialogue through social media to engender loyalty and predict and understand consumer behaviors. In the media, editorial leadership is eager to better manage reader commentary and to learn underlying patterns that suggest specific emotional tone. In healthcare, free-form texts are the most valuable data (doctor's notes, patient histories, healthcare messages posted by patients on social media). Such text contain information for physicians to use in practice and for public agencies to make healthcare decisions. Methods and tools that discern meaning by extracting information piecewise and visualize complex data represent an important advance in our understanding of social media intercourse. A data-driven design approach to visualize content will aggregate meanings more apparently and improve our ability to understand this emerging communication channel. Nick Cercone is renowned as an innovator in computer science research. His contributions to natural language understanding and knowledge representation with head driven phrase structure grammar (HPSG) parsers and with Knowledge Discovery in Databases (KDD) is considered pioneering work in both areas. Cercone’s question-answering systems made original use of HPSGs resulting in several useful unique exemplars: • SYSTEMX, a natural language interface to relational databases, resulted in state-of-the-art advances, including design and implementation of a parser for multiple domains, inheritance reasoning for HPSG, learning of semantic and syntactic information through dialog, computing and utilizing correct navigation (join path) information, and portability. • EMATISE, our domain independent natural language “front-end” to Internet search engines is based on HPSG. EMATISE parses natural language phrases, extracts important semantic information, and analyzes phrases to generate meaningful keywords for parallel Internet searches resulting in return of relevant web pages. • Machine translation has fascinated and frustrated researchers. GRMT (Generate and Repair Machine Translation) advanced linguistically based MT approaches. Three phases, Analysis Lite MT, Translation Candidate Interpretation (TCI) and Repair and Iterate (RI) operate independently to quickly iterate to correct translations. ALMT generates translation candidates (TC) by considering syntactic and semantic differences between language pairs without sophisticated analysis. TCI interprets the TC; if it retains the source meaning the TC is considered a translation, otherwise it is repaired and re-interpreted. The TCI and RI stages ensure the accuracy of the translation result. In knowledge discovery, data analysis and mining and machine learning Cercone and colleague Jiawan Han invented the “concept tree ascension” technique making possible generalization (“drilling down”) and specialization of data-mined results using attribute-oriented generalization. For this research Cercone was awarded F’IEEE. Some novel exemplars include: • DBLEARN performs knowledge discovery in databases. Using attribute-oriented generalization with set-oriented database operations, we extract generalized data. Attribute-oriented concept tree ascension is applied in generalization, substantially reducing the computational complexity of the learning processes. Characteristic, discrimination, association, and statistical (evolution) rules are discovered using this approach. DBDISCOVER improved the efficiency of DBLEARN and has been transferred to industry (Rogers Cablesystems SaskTel). • DBROUGH further refines data mining capabilities by applying rough sets methods to the final generalized relation (from DBLEARN) and, without losing information, further reduces the final generalized relation. • ELEM2 induces decision rules from datasets and classifies new examples by applying the induced rules. ELEM2 is distinguished by several new strategies in the induction and classification processes: evaluating attribute-value pairs during induction reflecting the degree of relevance of an attribute-value pair to a target concept and leading to the most relevant pairs for formulating rules, and handling inconsistent training examples by defining an unlearnable region of a concept based on its probability distribution in the training data. ELEM2 employs a new rule quality measure for handling imperfect data by post-pruning generated rules. Experiments evaluated ELEM2 with C4.5 and CN2. ELEM2 produced better classification accuracies than C4.5 and CN2. • ELEM2-CBR is a learning and problem solving system integrating rule induction and case-based reasoning. The student will work as part of a team of graduate (and occasionally) undergraduate student researchers. As part of this team the student will be expected to make several presentations to private sector partners when we meet with them. The student will work somewhat independently on the project but will have supervision and mentors in the form of several PhD students and post-docs. The project will take advantage of the student's abilities, especially programming and communications. English language skills; programming skills; mathematics skills especially some statistics and probability; communications skills; self-motivation skills 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 York University – Toronto Ontario Nick Cercone 0 1 The Globe and Mail and Empress Software English Biopolymer grafting for the development of bioactive packaging and application in food microbiology Hypothesis: The grafting of monomers and strengthening the CNC can significantly improve the functional properties of bioactive and their inhibitory capacity against food pathogens films. Objectives 1) synthesize three types of bioactive film modified by molecular grafting (in the presence of monomers such as TMPTMA, HEMA, silane) and building with CNC, according to optimal formulations determined in previous studies. 2) Characterize the structure of the films and their rheological properties. 3) Apply these movies on a model food (meat, vegetables) inoculated with pathogens to verify their inhibitory capacity during storage. Methodology The grafting of monomers is performed on biopolymers (MC, chitosan) under gamma irradiation. The CNC will also be incorporated as a reinforcing agent (filler) in the polymer. Bioactive agents will be selected on the basis of previous studies to perform a specific inhibitor to the selected bacteria (L. monocytogenes, S. Typhimurium and E. coli O157: H7). The molecular structure of the films will be analyzed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. SEM analysis could also be carried out to verify the structure (surface and cross section) functionalized films. The mechanical properties, fences and water resistance of the films will be analyzed to verify the effect of functionalization (grafting, addition of CNC and antimicrobials). of gamma and their intercalation CNC swelling resistance and solubility rate irradiation. The antimicrobial properties of the films are determined by applying the films inoculated with pathogenic bacteria at a concentration of 104-105 CFU / g dietary patterns. Microbiological analyzes will be performed on a storage period (2 weeks) to verify the effect of bioactive functionalized films (compared to control non-functionalized film and non-bioactive). Samples will be collected regularly and plated on specific agar media to perform counts. Professor Monique Lacroix His research in food science promote the development of bio-food industry through the development of new processing technologies and treatments to ensure the overall quality of food and the development of food products in the development of new products has high value. The development of new technology (irradiation) or combinations of treatments (heat, packaging modified, fermentation, cold atmosphere) reduces losses while ensuring the preservation of nutritional value and safety of the product. The development of new processes is ensured by various spheres of activity, such as chemistry and food biochemistry, physico-chemical properties and sensory evaluation of food. Effect of technological treatments on the functionality of proteins and other macromolecules Foods are composed of macromolecules mixture in an aqueous system exists between these complex interactions that govern a variety of properties such as nutritional value, functional properties, physical stability, microbiological, etc.. Dr. Lacroix is an assumption that it is possible to control the interactions between these macromolecules during technological treatments and get for each type of food or a mixture of basic proteins, determining physico-chemical properties of conservation, functionality food or novel food products and other high value such as edible coatings. Treatment for reactions "cross-linking" allow the development of biodegradable packaging bioactive (e.g. antioxidants, antimicrobials). We propose models of immobilization and encapsulation of bioactive molecules or components based on the structure and functionality of bioactive agents to maximize and stabilize the function of these molecules during storage and to ensure significant returns in food. We want to develop enriched with bioactive ingredients to improve health foods, and develop innovative food products health connotation. Secondary metabolites of plants and probiotic bacteria and their immunostimulatory antioxidant and antitumorales It is now recognized that phenolic compounds and other bacterial secondary metabolites are micronutrients that have invaluable for cellular health biological properties. We study various properties of food and plant extracts, purify the active compounds and to identify their characterization studies of mechanisms and the development of new cosmetic, pharmaceutical and food supplements with antibacterial, anti-free radical, anti- cancer and others. The Research Laboratory of Applied Science in Food is physically located at Irradiation Centre of Canada. Irradiation is one of the technologies that can contribute to the reduction of foodborne illness. Despite the development of new technologies, more than 2 million people are annually affected by foodborne illness in Canada costing more than $ 1.3 billion / year. Irradiation Centre of Canada The Canadian Irradiation Centre (CIC) is a unique center of excellence in the world. The ICC is the result of an association with the firm Nordion Inc. and Armand-Frappier INRS-Institut for the development and promotion of the irradiation technology and its applications. These objectives are achieved through basic and applied research, training of highly qualified personnel, the development of new technologies and technology transfer. CIC develops new technologies in collaboration with members of the INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier Centre in the field of preventive medicine. These new technologies are the result of collaboration between different spheres of activities such as food science, health, environment, microbiology, immunology, biochemistry, epidemiology, comparative medicine, and physical chemistry sensory evaluation. The student (or students, maximum 2) will participate in all stages of the methodology mentioned above, but it will be mainly involved in microbiological analysis: - Molecular grafting polymers and synthetic films - Structural analysis of the films - Microbiological analyzes on dietary patterns inoculated with pathogenic bacteria - Speaking of results, presentation of progress reports and a final report writing The antimicrobial properties of the films are determined by applying the films inoculated with pathogenic bacteria at a concentration of 104-105 CFU / g dietary patterns. Microbiological analyzes will be performed on a storage period (2 weeks) to verify the effect of bioactive functionalized films (compared to control non-functionalized film and non-bioactive). Samples will be collected regularly and plated on specific agar media to perform counts. University degree in related areas: food science (especially food microbiology that is the important part of this project), polymer chemistry (structural analysis and functional properties, modification of biopolymers) have advanced theoretical concepts on nanotechnology involving cellulose nanocrystals. Essential: The student must be able to work in containment level 2 microbiology and have received WHMIS training and microbiological risks. 1 June, 2015 1 September, 2015 Université INRS – Laval Québec Monique Lacroix 0 0 null English Chemical modification of biopolymers and cellulose nanocrystals for the development of bioactive films The proposed project is aligned in the chemical modification of polymers and cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) to improve the nanoparticle-polymer interactions and maximize i) the reinforcing effect of nanoparticles (polymer filling) as well as ii) interactions nanoparticles bioactive-agent in the manufacture of bioactive packaging films. Hypothesis: The chemical modification of polymers and CNC optimizes interactions bioactive polymer-CNC-agent and significantly improve the functional properties of bioactive films. Objectives: 1) Optimize four methods of functionalization of bioactive movies: TEMPO reaction (carboxylation CNC) with the application of chitosan films, crosslinking by gamma irradiation nanocomposites starch CNC crosslinking of chitosan by gamma irradiation in the presence of CNC, CNC grafting polycaprolactone films on the isocyanate to compatibilize CNC (hydrophobic) with insoluble polyesters. 2) characterize the progress of chemical reactions carried out. 3) Determine the in vitro antioxidant capacity of the films and their ability to release bioactive agents during storage. Methodology The films will be synthesized according to procedures developed in our laboratories. Bioactive agents will be selected on the basis of previous studies. The molecular structure of the films will be analyzed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. SEM analysis may also be performed. The mechanical properties of the films, barriers and water resistance of the films will be analyzed to verify the effect of functionalization. The antioxidant properties of the films will be determined according to the method of Salmieri and Lacroix (2006). The release of bioactive agents from film to food (meat or vegetables) during storage will be assessed on the best formulation of bioactive film on a 2-week period by the Folin-Ciocalteu. Expected Results Targeted functionalization of CNC and polymers can significantly improve the rheological properties of the films by increasing the CNC-polymer molecular interactions. These results allow to consider a technology transfer with the help of the industrial company that works in this project with our laboratory. " Professor Monique Lacroix His research in food science promote the development of bio-food industry through the development of new processing technologies and treatments to ensure the overall quality of food and the development of food products in the development of new products has high value. The development of new technology (irradiation) or combinations of treatments (heat, packaging modified, fermentation, cold atmosphere) reduces losses while ensuring the preservation of nutritional value and safety of the product. The development of new processes is ensured by various spheres of activity, such as chemistry and food biochemistry, physico-chemical properties and sensory evaluation of food. Effect of technological treatments on the functionality of proteins and other macromolecules Foods are composed of macromolecules mixture in an aqueous system exists between these complex interactions that govern a variety of properties such as nutritional value, functional properties, physical stability, microbiological, etc. Dr. Lacroix is an assumption that it is possible to control the interactions between these macromolecules during technological treatments and get for each type of food or a mixture of basic proteins, determining physico-chemical properties of conservation, functionality food or novel food products and other high value such as edible coatings. Treatment for reactions "," cross-linking "" allow the development of biodegradable packaging bioactive (e.g. antioxidants, antimicrobials). We propose models of immobilization and encapsulation of bioactive molecules or components based on the structure and functionality of bioactive agents to maximize and stabilize the function of these molecules during storage and to ensure significant returns in food. We want to develop enriched with bioactive ingredients to improve health foods, and develop innovative food products health connotation. Secondary metabolites of plants and probiotic bacteria and their immunostimulatory antioxidant and antitumorales It is now recognized that phenolic compounds and other bacterial secondary metabolites are micronutrients that have invaluable for cellular health biological properties. We study various properties of food and plant extracts, purify the active compounds and to identify their characterization studies of mechanisms and the development of new cosmetic, pharmaceutical and food supplements with antibacterial, anti-free radical, anti- cancer and others. The Research Laboratory of Applied Science in Food is physically located at Irradiation Centre of Canada. Irradiation is one of the technologies that can contribute to the reduction of foodborne illness. Despite the development of new technologies, more than 2 million people are annually affected by foodborne illness in Canada costing more than $ 1.3 billion / year. Irradiation Centre of Canada The Canadian Irradiation Centre (CIC) is a unique center of excellence in the world. The ICC is the result of an association with the firm Nordion Inc. and Armand-Frappier INRS-Institut for the development and promotion of the irradiation technology and its applications. These objectives are achieved through basic and applied research, training of highly qualified personnel, the development of new technologies and technology transfer. CIC develops new technologies in collaboration with members of the INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier Centre in the field of preventive medicine. These new technologies are the result of collaboration between different spheres of activities such as food science, health, environment, microbiology, immunology, biochemistry, epidemiology, comparative medicine, and physical chemistry sensory evaluation. " "The student will participate in all stages of the methodology mentioned above, but it will be mainly involved in the chemical modification of polymers: - Functionalization (molecular grafting, crosslinking coupling polymers) and synthetic films - Structural analysis of the films - Analysis of biological antioxidant properties (antiradical) movies - Chemical Scripture (Chemdraw, ISIS Draw, etc.). - Speaking of results, presentation of progress reports and writing a final report. " "University degree in related fields: polymer chemistry (especially organic synthesis applied to polymers, structural analysis and functional properties, modification of biopolymers) have advanced in nanotechnology cellulose nanocrystals theoretical concepts. Essential: The student must be able to work under a chemical hood and have received WHMIS training. " 1 June, 2015 1 September, 2015 Université INRS – Laval Québec Monique Lacroix 0 0 null English Enabling Effective Human Spatial Cognition, Orientation and Behaviour in Immersive Virtual Environments Interested in contributing to innovative research at the intersection of Psychology/Cognitive Science, Informatics, Human Factors/HCI, and immersive Virtual Reality/gaming in an interdisciplinary team? Virtual reality software and hardware (e.g., Oculus Rift) is becoming increasingly affordable and powerful, and is increasingly being used in experimental research. In fact, the possibility to conduct tightly controlled and repeatable experiments with naturalistic multi-modal stimuli in a closed action-perception loop suggest that VR could become a powerful yet flexible tool for research and applications. Despite increasing computational power and rendering quality, though, it is debatable whether humans necessarily perceive and behave similarly in real and virtual environments – which is essential for achieving sufficient real-world transfer of skills learned and experimental results gained in the lab. What might be missing? What can we learn from this? How might we be able to “cheat intelligently” in VR and, e.g., provide users with a compelling sensation of moving through the simulated environments without the need for full physical locomotion? Can the mere illusion of self-motion (“vection”) be sufficient for providing similar benefits as actual locomotion? i.e., what is the functional significance of vection? How far can we get with just visual cues? What benefits do we gain from multi-modal stimuli? To tackle such research questions, we will use the popular game engine Unity3D to program experiments with human participants in immersive VR that will then be statistically analyzed and written up scholarly. In particular, I am looking for student interested in working on one of the following projects: (A) Investigate and utilize multi-modal and higher-level synergistic benefits to enhance self-motion illusions (vection) in VR, which contributed to fundamental knowledge and can help to enable more compelling and effective human-computer interfaces for immersive VR. (B) Design evaluate user-powered motion cueing interfaces to enable more natural and intuitive locomotion through and spatial orientation in VR. Examples include a modified Gyroxus gaming chair, where leaning forwards and sideways controlled simulated translations and rotations, respectively. (C) Investigating the functional/behavioral significance of self-motion illusions (vection): E.g., does vection allow us to perform tasks we could not otherwise perform as well? We have first evidence that vection can facilitate perspective switches, and several experimental paradigms lined up to investigate further behavioral measures. See http://iSpaceLab.com/contact for further details and how you might see yourself fit in. GOAL: To investigate what constitutes effective, robust, and intuitive human spatial orientation and behaviour. This fundamental knowledge will be applied to design novel, more effective human-computer interfaces and interaction paradigms that enable similarly effective processes in computer-mediated environments like virtual reality (VR), immersive gaming, and multi-media. MOTIVATION: While modern VR simulations can have stunning photorealism, they are typically unable to provide a life-like and compelling sensation of moving through the simulated world, thus limiting perceived realism, behavioural effectiveness, user acceptance, and commercial success. Moreover, VR users frequently get disoriented because the supported spatial behaviour is still clumsy and unnatural. APPROACH SHORT/MID-TERM OBJECTIVES: I propose that investigating and exploiting self-motion illusions (“vection”) might be a lean and elegant way to overcome such shortcomings and provide a truly “moving experience” in computer-mediated environments, thus enabling more affordable-yet-effective simulations for broader audiences. My team recently provided the first evidence that such embodied self-motion illusions can indeed facilitate perspective switches and spatial orientation, thus providing similar benefits as actual self-motion, but without the cost and effort involved in having to physically move the user. This research program will corroborate and further investigate the functional/behavioural significance of self-motion illusions for a wider range of spatial orientation/cognition tasks that would normally be difficult to accomplish without actual self-motion. To this end, my team will perform experiments with human participants in VR to investigate and optimize multi-modal and higher-level contributions and interactions for spatial orientation and self-motion perception/illusions, while minimizing reference frame conflicts. Specifically, my group of trainees will: (A) Research and utilize higher-level and multi-modal synergistic benefits to enhance vection; (B) Design and evaluate user-powered motion cueing interfaces; (C) Investigate the functional significance of vection using three complementary experimental paradigms; (D) Design transitions into VR; (E) Develop novel experimental paradigms; and (F) Integrate findings into our theoretical framework. Multi-modal, naturalistic and immersive VR provides the unique opportunity to study human perception and behaviour in reproducible, clearly defined and controllable experimental conditions. LONG-TERM GOALS: To investigate how we can best employ self-motion illusion and research-guided interface design and development to enable life-like, robust and effortless spatial cognition, orientation and behaviour in VR and other immersive media. SIGNIFICANCE: This research program will lead to a deeper understanding of human spatial cognition, perception and behaviour that will enable us to design more effective human-computer interfaces and interaction metaphors. These will provide improved test beds for evaluation as well as enable and inspire further research. Thus, combining fundamental and applied research perspectives will allow us to identify the essential parameters of perception/action and will pin-point the “blind spots” that enable the brain to be tricked when simulating VR. This will enable the creation of better cost-effective virtual solutions for numerous immersive and tele-presence applications such as driving/flight simulation, architecture walk-throughs, immersive gaming and recreation, space exploration, engineering, emergency training, minimally invasive surgery, and video conferencing. You’ll be working in a team to design, program, conduct, analyze, and write up mixed-methods immersive Virtual Reality experiments with human participants. You’ll be embedded and part of the iSpace team, which offers a collegial, open-minded, supportive and creative research team and atmosphere. We’ll have weekly lab meetings and discussion/writing/research teams. Your role depends a bit on your background/strengths: If you have a strong background in programming/computer science/Unity3D development, you’d be more involved in programming and setting up experiments using immersive Virtual Reality (and maybe also online experiments), although you’ll still be involved in setting up, running, analyzing, and writing up experiments. If you have a strong background in psychology/cognitive science and statistics, you’ll focus more on designing, running, analyzing, and writing up experiments, although you’ll still be involved in programming/Unity3D development. What I ask from students working in my lab is (in a nutshell) a commitment to actively and constructively contribute to the team and lab and to actively conduct and contribute to research in the context the overall lab goals. REQUIRED: Teamplayer, reliable, well-organized, proactive, English fluency, experience in programming, ideally in the context of VR/Gaming/Computer graphics. Interest in using Virtual Reality and psychology/cognitive science approaches for scientific research to better understand human embodied perception/cognition/behaviour. USEFUL, BUT NOT REQUIRED: Unity3D, 3D modeling, statistics/experimental design/data analysis, writing (especially scholarly scientific writing), technical/building skills, enthusiasm, good sense of humour, technical/building skills, experience with VR/immersive gaming programming/equipment. (See http://iSpaceLab.com/contact for details) Applicants should be highly motivated, have basic programming ability, and have a strong interest in interdisciplinary scientific research aligned with the overall goals and vision of the iSpace lab (see http://iSpaceLab.com/vision). 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 Simon Fraser University – Surrey British Columbia Bernhard Riecke 0 0 There might, be but it depends on the success of our current NSERC Engage proposal and potential fol English Global Studies of Healthy Development and Well Being of Children and Youth My psychological research proposal for this Mitacs Globalink internship programme has two inter-related international developmental foci that would interest Mitacs interns: The first employs quasi-ecological methods for studying thriving children and youth around the globe. We have collected data in Thailand, Canada, Peru, Italy, the UK, Turkey, the US with very young children and their families by filming an entire day in their lives (Gillen Cameron, 2010). We have also worked with resilient mobile adolescents in China, Thailand, South Africa, India and Canada (Cameron, 2011) again filming one day in each youth’s life. At present we are filming days in the lives of children in the transition to school in Italy, Finland and Canada and hope to include Brazil and Africa in this new initiative (Dmytro, Kubiniene Cameron, 2014). This is ‘cultural’ rather than cross-cultural research, meaning, it seeks not to make generalizations from quantitative findings but rather to uncover and understand the nature and texture of wellbeing with in-depth qualitative analyses of each individual case, to create a vivid picture the richness of thriving and resilience in many contexts and cultures. Our second and associated research direction is cross-cultural. We examine the moral development of school children and youth with respect to their judgments and justifications of story characters’ verbal deception and truth telling (Lau, Cameron, Chieh, O’Leary, Fu Lee, 2013). We gather interview data from young people in China, Canada, Japan and the US to make these comparisons and with new support from SSHRCC are moving to investigate truth and trust values of bicultural youth. These two strands of research converge in studies reflecting mixed methods of data collection and analysis as in: Dmytro, Lo, O’Leary, Fu, Lee Cameron, in press, 2014; Cameron, Lau, Fu Lee, 2012; and Chen, Lau, Tapanya Cameron, 2012. Many research students are involved in our many publications (see Cameron CV). We have a vibrant lab at UBC that includes several, in fact a majority of whom are international students with diverse cultural backgrounds and an international Mitacs student would be very much welcomed. The opportunity to engage in this integrated joint initiative affords students a richly variegated research experience. Our findings have theoretical developmental and practical implications for education counseling and child, family, and youth care service provision. As a developmental psychologist I conduct collaborative, cultural and cross-cultural studies of children and youth in numerous locations around the globe. My primary interests in these studies are broad but intimately interconnected. First, I am dedicated to studying human thriving across the life-course. I have worked with thirty-month-old thriving toddlers in seven locations. Those studies culminated in a collaborative book (Gillen, J. Cameron, C.A. (Eds.). (2010). International perspectives on early childhood research: A Day in the Life. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan). We use a multi-method quasi-ecological approach that involves filming an entire day in the lives of participants, elicited photography and iterative interviews. My major interests, reported in numerous articles and book chapters, included studies of these toddlers' early attachment relationships, security strivings, humour, graphic representations (both emergent literacy and drawing), and play engagements. We moved on from this early years research to investigate adolescent resilience of migrant youth in five global locations. Once again, my focus was on security strivings, humour, and traditional cultural influences on well being despite adversity of poverty, significant relocation and refugee status in some cases. Transitions are challenging as well as exhilarating phases in life and our most recent research investigates strengths of young children in the transition to school. Our initial studies focus on the continuities/discontinuities of agency and communitarianism in the children’ play activities at home and school. In a further initiative we use these qualitative methods to explore older adult resilience as well. Interconnected to these cultural studies are our cross-cultural studies of school-aged children and youth in their moral development. We have studied young people’s moral judgements and justifications of lying and truth telling under many circumstances where values collide. All children are socialized to be honest and to avoid dishonesty, but when communitarian values of modesty or more individualistic values of protecting a best friend come head to head with truth telling sometime the truth might not win out. We have been interested in exploring cultural differences in social factors like ethical priorities, and social precepts that have been shown to affect differentially moral decision-making of children and youth. The methods employed here involve dialogic interviews related to moral dilemmas and we see large numbers of participants in order make valid and reliable cross-cultural comparisons. Most recently, we have received funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council for studies of truth telling and trust, an new avenue of research that beautifully relates to my cultural studies of security strivings. We will be commencing these studies this coming academic year and will have preliminary findings by 2015. Interwoven within the programmes of research described above are my deep interests in children’s thought, language and socio-emotional development which I cannot elaborate upon here. One other associated endeavor our lab continues to pursue is the investigation of attachment relationships, emotionality, gender and physiological (cortisol and alpha amylase) stress reactivity. All together my students receive a broad-based and thorough training in the investigation of developmental well being in cultural context. A Mitacs research student would be required first to engage in training for ethical standards in our research community and formal institutions like schools. Children are especially sensitive participants so behavioural ethics standards are rigorously maintained. At the beginning of the tenure, the research student would he expected to read and evaluate the basic research literature in the specific fields that we are focusing upon. Then, discussions as to which aspects of our many ongoing studies might be appropriate for data collection would be in order. Training would be undertaken. Under supervision, data would be collected either in schools of in homes when the school year is completed. Data entry and analysis would be conducted, again, under supervision. Use of such qualitative software as NVivo or the SPSS programme for quantitative data entry would be trained as well. It would be expected that research reports (conference presentations and papers) would be written, most likely in collaboration with other lab members. Some flexibility is possible in choice of available projects, depending on the skills and background of the student and the needs of the lab at the time. What is not negotiable is that the experience would involve everything from library searches, research proposal descriptions, training in data collection and reduction to project write-ups, a full research project engagement. An eligible candidate for this research position would have some academic background in developmental studies of children and youth. Further, experience working with children would be an advantage and pleasure working with children, a necessity. The position would require study and training in ethical procedures for working with young people, teachers, parents and schools. Ease accessing the relevant research literature in our areas of study would be necessary. Routine data collection skills would be taught and exercised and data entry would be expected. Writing research reports would also be guided and encouraged. 4 May, 2015 24 July, 2015 University of British Columbia – Vancouver British Columbia Catherine Ann Cameron 0 0 null English Synthesis and characterisation of new dipyrrin-indigo ligands and complexes. Based on our knowledge of dipyrrin synthesis and dipyrrin complexes (Chem. Commun. 2014, 50, 7028-7031, Chem. Rev. 2007, 107, 1831-1861) we would like to create a new kind of metallic ligand that would merge the skeleton of a dipyrrin and the well-known indigo dye. • Dipyrrin-indigo BF2 complexes for bio-medical applications: We expect these new dipyrrin-indigo ligands and their metallic complexes to adsorb the light in the near Infra-Red (Chem. Commun. 2010, 46, 6753-6755). As complexation of dipyrrin to BF2 generates highly fluorescent compounds (Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2008, 47, 1184-1201.), BF2 complexes of the dipyrrin-indigo ligands could fluoresce in the near Infra-Red and have interesting applications in fluorescence imaging (Curr. Opin. Chem. Biol. 2003, 7, 626-34) or in photodynamic therapy (Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 77-88). • Dipyrrin-indigo ligands as potential redox-active ligand: As previously reported for indigo based ligand, we can expect the dipyrrin-indigo ligands to be redox-active (Chem.Commun., 2012, 48, 11082–11084). Redox-active ligands are of interest amongst inorganic chemists and have several applications in catalysis as for example coupling reactions or alcohol oxidation (Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 1440-1459). This project will combine the synthesis of dipyrrin-indigo ligands and their complexes, and the study of the effect of metal complexation and ligand substituents on their physico-properties (color, UV absorption, fluorescence and red-ox properties) The Thompson group specialises in the chemistry of pyrroles and poly-pyrrole framework (dipyrrins, BODIPYs and prodigiosenes) in the field of synthetic methodology and medicinal chemistry with potential applications in chemotherapeutics anti-malarial drugs, photophysics, materials, and tagging/sensing. •AREA 1: Design and synthesis of prodigiosenes as preclinical pharmaceutical agents for unmet medical needs: bioactivity of prodigiosenes: The Thompson group is a world leader in the synthesis of analogues of prodigiosin, a natural product containing a dipyrrin and a pyrrolic unit. One of our prodigiosenes serves as our lead compound for cancer therapeutics, following impressive in-vivo hollow fibre assay results, obtained in collaboration with the US National Cancer Institute, along with excellent anti-cancer and toxicity profiles that are 100-fold improved over prodigiosin itself. Other prodigiosenes have nanomolar antimalarial IC50’s whilst others have impressive activity against superbugs such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which threatens our global reliance upon antibiotics. We collaborate with experts around the world to gain information regarding bioactivity, anion transport, topoisomerase inhibition, DNA cleavage-inducing abilities, DNA intercalation, selectivity, accumulation, penetration, intracellular fate, etc. Demonstrating the impact of our work, we published cover artwork for Org. Biomol. Chem. , and the significance of our research has been highlighted in the Royal Society of Chemistry weekly press pack. • AREA 2: BODIPYs, dipyrrins and the dipyrrinato ligand: The Thompson NSERC Discovery research program features on the international stage to advance the utility of the dipyrrinato construct via the development of manipulative synthetic tools. Recently, we have generated Cl- BODIPYs, an entirely new genre of BODIPYs designed for facile substitution at boron, to expand the repertoire of this molecular skeleton widely used in photophysical, materials and biochemical/tagging applications. We have also developed unprecedented methodology to remove the –BX2 moiety from BODIPYs, rendering the use of stable/fluorescent BODIPYs a useful purification strategy within polypyrrole synthesis. These synthetic methodology tools have transformative impact to the application of BODIPYs in fields as diverse as biomolecular sensing and solar harvesting materials. Our invited article in Chemical Reviews, “Advances in the Chemistry of Dipyrrins and their Complexes”, is the first dedicated review of this area, described by reviewers as a “truly outstanding, landmark review” and a “fine, timely and important review” (220 citations as of May 2014, IF = 41). • AREA 3: Synthesis and manipulation of heterocycles: As well as developing new and improved methodology for the preparation of prodigiosenes and dipyrrins, the Thompson group is involved in collaborative projects where researchers with expertise in other disciplines need to access novel heterocycles. This translational research is often reliant upon collaborations with synthetic chemists, exposing trainees in our group to a variety of research applications. For example, international collaborations that fall outside the areas of dipyrrins and prodigiosenes involve our design and syntheses of heterocycles as enzyme inhibitors, and our design and delivery of analogues of bone graft/regeneration markers with sensing capabilities. The student will conduct chemistry experiments in the laboratory under the guidance and supervision of myself and a lab member. His/her role will be to develop the synthesis of dipyrrin-indigo ligands and prepare complexes of these ligands. As it is a research project, he/she will be require to troubleshoot synthetic and technical problems either by performing an appropriate bibliographic survey or by communicating issues with the lab members or myself. Upon completion of the synthesis he/she will study the physical properties of the obtained complexes and ligands (UV absorption, fluorescence, etc...). Considering that working in a chemistry laboratory presents chemical related hazards, he or she will be required to follow the safety guidelines established by Dalhousie University and the Thompson group. He or she will be required to participate and communicate his/her finding and progress at weekly group meetings. Every lab experiment should be properly recorded in his/her laboratory note book and he/she will be required to write a report upon completion of the internship. he student must have pursued or is pursuing undergrad studies in chemistry and must have followed organic chemistry classes. Basic knowledge on conducting and analysing chemistry experiments are required. The student must have at least completed an organic chemistry laboratory class and be able to: -Carefully and accurately set up a basic chemistry experiment -Work up the experiment (extraction, purification using column chromatography or crystallisation) -Analyse the experiment (TLC, NMR) The student must be fluent enough in English to be able to accurately complete a laboratory book and to share and discuss his work progress with the research supervisor. 1 May, 2015 1 August, 2015 Dalhousie University – Halifax Nova Scotia Alison Thompson 0 0 null English Linking Administrative Data to Identify Barriers and Facilitators to Youth Mental Health Services In this project, youth mental health problems will be explored using available administrative and survey databases. Relevant administrative datasets are available within New Brunswick, and we are working at linking the data from Education, Justice and other relevant ministries. These data can provide an opportunity to explore the clinical pathways and observe patient transitions through the health and education systems. We will also utilize relevant Statistics Canada survey data including the National Longitudinal Study of Children and Youth (NLSCY), the National Population Health Study (NPHS), and the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) to better understand the predictors, correlates, and outcomes for these conditions. These datasets can be accessed and analyzed through the Statistics Canada Research Data Centers at UNB. Other datasets that may be available within New Brunswick will be sought. The NLSCY is a longitudinal study that examines children and youth through multiple cycles and asks parents if children have been diagnosed with Autism and Eating Disorders, meaning that the onset of mental health disorders can be predicted and the impact of these conditions on a variety of developmental indicators can be tracked. The CCHS includes adolescents aged 12 and above and asks respondents (or the person responding on their behalf) to self-identify the presence of a variety of mental health conditions. The CCHS is a cross-sectional survey, so examining predictors associated with a particular condition and outcomes following onset and diagnosis of a particular condition is not possible, however it will be possible to examine what factors (such as SES and other comorbidities) are associated with these mental health conditions. A comprehensive mental health module was included in the 2002 cycle of the CCHS, with a more limited of set of mental health questions appearing in other CCHS cycles. The NPHS has a more limited set of mental health items, however at minimum some basic information regarding onset and related health outcomes can be used. In marrying together data sources from across government departments, our broad aim will first be to catalogue the range of services being accessed and examining whether there are systematic differences in service utilization patterns from across the region. Furthermore, a range of health, educational, and social outcomes will be catalogued. The analytical approach will move from descriptive to inferential, with the view to first describing the prevalence of the conditions before moving on to exploring the risk factors and outcomes. Using a variety of regression based statistical techniques including survival analysis, panel data methods, path models, hierarchical linear modelling and Poisson techniques we will analyze service utilization patterns and patient outcomes. We will also seek to quantify how utilization patterns differ across jurisdictions and measure how wait-times vary. Ultimately, the statistical analysis will be shaped by the available data. We will apply leading-edge approaches to statistical modelling that help us to better understand which services are accessed, in what frequency, and the success of these treatments in promoting better health outcomes. Children with mental health disorders receive treatment and services through a myriad of service providers including health professionals, educators, social workers, and the justice system. The provision of care is largely uncoordinated and results in poor outcomes, lengthy queues, and inefficiencies. We are involved in a large research program that brings together a cross-sectorial and interdisciplinary team of researchers, health care providers, and decision makers from across Atlantic Canada (Prince Edward Island – PEI, New Brunswick – NB, Nova Scotia – NS, and Newfoundland and Labrador – NL) to take a diverse and innovative approach to studying how services are provided to children and youth identified with various mental health problems. We intend to document and analyze how treatment is received across government sectors including Health, Education, Social Development, Justice, Public Safety, and Youth and Family Services. Although part of a larger, multi-year and cross-provincial project, the goal of this specific research project is to use quantitative methods to: (1) document service delivery in New Brunswick through analysis of relevant administrative datasets and (2) use this information to propose more effective approaches to service delivery for youth mental health problems. Our research is guided by the following questions: 1. What health services are youth currently accessing? 2. What services are they accessing through other agencies (e.g., education, social work)? 3. What are significant barriers/facilitators to accessing these services? 4. What services are effective/ineffective and why? 5. Can the system be re-organized and resources better allocated to improve outcomes and efficiency? This research is of particular interest in Atlantic Canada because of the reported incidence of mental health disorders in the region. For instance, 30-35% of young (grades 7-12) women and 15-20% of young men in the Atlantic provinces show elevated signs of depressive symptoms (Public Health Agency of Canada, 2012) and close to 30% of Canadian high school girls engage in weight loss behaviours although many of them are not overweight (Boyce, 2004; Boyce, King, Roche, 2008). Our team consists of researchers, practitioners, policy makers, and advocacy groups from a wide range of disciplines (e.g., psychology, sociology, economics, operations research), which allows us to examine the five conditions from multiple perspectives to enhance understanding of how children with these mental health conditions and their families navigate the myriad of largely uncoordinated service providers. Using quantitative analysis of existing administrative and Statistics Canada survey databases (i.e., NLSCY, CCHS, and NPHS), we will seek to determine which services are effective, where there are significant access issues, and identify exemplary models of care that exist in New Brunswick. The findings and recommendations will provide a framework that can be extended to other provinces. Taking an integrated health systems approach, our aim is to develop a better understanding of the impact that mental health problems have on youth and families. We will also identify barriers to access and promising practices within New Brunswick with the goal of improving patient outcomes, reducing the burden on caregivers and service agencies, and increasing system efficiency. The proposed student will primarily help in preparing relevant administrative databases for analysis, linking multiple databases, and analyzing data. The student will also be involved in writing up specific research findings that are connected with the objectives of the larger research project. The research project will be tailored to the student's specific interests in youth mental health and to available data sources. The student will extend his or her knowledge of data analysis and writing results for academic and public policy audiences. With the help of the supervisor, the student will be expected to develop relevant and measurable research questions, work within a specific timeline for completion, and present their results at the end. Opportunity will be available for publications and/or presentations. Ability to analyze data using SPSS and/or other programs (e.g., STATA, Mplus, HLM), comfortable interacting with researchers and government agency officials, interest in youth mental health, and an ability to conceptualize and present findings to an audience of researchers. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of New Brunswick – Fredericton New Brunswick Scott Ronis 0 0 null English Integrated, interactive design and engagement media for sustainability IIDEMS– Integrated, interactive design and engagement media for sustainability is an interdisciplinary research project within the GRAND (Graphics Animation and New Media) Network of Centres of Excellence. Planning and design for sustainability in the built environment are technically complex, information- and visualization-rich tasks that must engage diverse public, professional, regulatory and political stakeholders in meaningful, collaborative decision-making about the future. Within that context IIDEMS was developed to develop digital media approaches and tools that inspire, engage and inform these stakeholders to imagine, plan, design, construct, operate and inhabit a more sustainable built environment. Our research questions span three themes: Engagement design – Which types of digital media tools improve stakeholder collaboration, engagement, and understanding within sustainability-related planning and design decisions? Which types of digital media tools improve decision-making and coordination across built environment project scales and phases? Which types of digital media tools improve the ways diverse stakeholders are equitably ‘heard’, ‘understood’ and ‘recorded’ in decision-making settings? Interface and display technologies – Which types of digital media tools better represent and help stakeholders interact with sustainability information and decisions? Which types and combinations of interfaces and displays improve consultation, collaboration and consensus between and among stakeholders? Computational methods – Which methods of data acquisition, integration and management better integrate across engagement approaches, interfaces and displays? How can dissimilar data generated in for diverse purposes be made interoperable within sustainability decision-making processes? Our research team and approach is interdisciplinary, built upon expertise in design and collaboration tools for urban planning, urban design, architecture, engineering and building science. We are working on three sub-projects at three built environment scales — large, medium, and small. Our large scale sub-project focuses on digital media approaches and tools for urban neighbourhoods. Our medium scale sub-project focuses on digital media approaches and tools for building and site planning scales. Our small scale sub-project focuses on digital media approaches and tools for building system and occupant scales. Each of these sub-projects directly engages and benefits receptors organizations in sustainability research (Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions and the Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability), geospatial and building scale design tool providers (Esri Canada and AutoDesk), planning, urban and building design professionals (Perkins+Will), construction professionals (Ledcor), built environment policy makers, regulators and municipalities (City of Vancouver), building automation and control providers (Delta Controls), and data management tool providers (SAFE Software). Our research projects and products have been conceived, developed and tested in a context of real world, interdisciplinary. We will design, prototype and apply digital media applications in direct partnership with key receptors and beneficiaries. In addition to working prototypes, a significant outcome will be process and knowledge transfer between and among our diverse communities of computer science, digital media and built environment researchers, technology and software developers, built environment professionals and practitioners, city and community receptors, collaborators and students who will work closely together on our three interdependent sub-projects. I am a Professor of Landscape Architecture in the School of Architecture + Landscape Architecture at the University of British Columbia where I teach lecture courses and design studios, supervise graduate students (in professional degree and advanced study programs) and conduct research related to the sustainability dimensions of urban form. Since the mid-1990s, I have directed a design decision research lab to develop processes and tools that improve the means through which students, professionals, policy makers and the public are able to consider issues and metrics of energy, environment and climate change in urban planning and design. The results have contributed to urban design knowledge and tools to visualize and measure environmental themes and sustainability issues (land, water, energy, mobility, habitat, for example) in the physical, spatial dimensions and patterns of urban form. With colleagues in urban planning, engineering, digital media and computer science, I develop design decision support tools that automate, integrate and communicate tasks of information management, visualization, measurement and comparison of urban planning and design alternatives. Two research themes – Visualization and Spatial indicators and metrics — are central to this work. The visualization work develops data- and visually-rich tools and methods to fit within public planning processes and augment decision-makers’ ability to visualize, remember, analyze, measure, compare, and communicate land use planning policy and implementation alternatives The core asset upon which these tools are built is elementsdb (public version viewable at http://elementsdb.sala.ubc.ca), a web-accessible resource of field-measured, case-based examples of urban land uses, is the “visualization and data engine” of an urban design and public engagement methodology used throughout my work. Recently I have expanded these tools to include new urban design visualization and collaboration functions using multi-touch digital interfaces and multi-display technologies. Accompanying the Visualization work has been a parallel effort to improve the measures and metrics against which visualizations can be measured, compared and evaluated. I have developed set of spatial indicators and measurement methodologies related to public infrastructure (streets and utilities etc.) and sustainability in community development. Taken together, this visualization and indicators research enables better, more accessible means to visualize and measure urban planning and design alternatives quickly and iteratively when the need and opportunity is greatest to inform and influence public policy and decision-making. The results enable better understanding of the variables, tradeoffs and consequences embedded in urban planning and design alternatives. For example, I have applied many of our prototype tools to improve capacity to measure and visualize the anticipated energy and carbon emissions implications of urban planning and design alternatives. Work in this area illuminates relationships between land use, settlement pattern, building type, mobility and infrastructure alternatives and energy and carbon intensity. These methods have been applied to urban energy projects and have contributed to the development of prototype neighbourhood-scale energy and carbon modeling applications. The student(s) we seek would provide research and technical assistance in support of one or more of four principal investigators in urban design, architecture, civil engineering computer science and 2 post-doctoral fellows in computer science and geo-spatial design tools affiliated with the IIDEMS project. Specific roles would be tailored to a student’s expertise but could include: CASE STUDY MODELLING: Principal duties such as field documentation, spatial modelling, measurement and analyses of urban design case studies. URBAN FORM SIMULATION: Principal duties include visual, spatial and quantitative simulation of urban planning and design alternatives in sponsored research projects, typically for or with local cities and municipalities. DESIGN TOOLS: Principal duties such as analysis and representation tools for planning and design processes and decision support tools for collaboration and engagement and, performance indicators and metrics modeling and visualization. At the outset of the internship, we would develop an appropriate set of objectives, tasks and objectives in consultation with the selected student(s) and develop workflows, schedules and miletones for the 12 week term. Given the interdisciplinary context of this work we are open to a range of skill sets and backgrounds. We would consider students with the backgrounds or combination of backgrounds as follows. A student of planning, urban design, landscape architecture, architecture, civil engineering or environmental design with a background in digital media design and programming. Fluency with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) or Building Information Systems (BIM) is desired. A student in digital media or computer science with a background in multi-touch interface or multi-display programming, parametric modeling applicable to urban design, architecture or applications designed to facilitate public engagement (clickers, iPad, for example) 1 May, 2015 1 September, 2015 University of British Columbia – Vancouver British Columbia Ron Kellett 0 1 There are several but Esri Canada, AutoDesk, Perkins+Will Architecture and Urban Design would be amo English Electrical and Acoustic Characterization of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducer Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (CMUT) can be fabricated by using techniques pioneered by the integrated circuits industry. They can employ a sacrificial MEMS fabrication technology, where an oxide is commonly used as the sacrificial layer and the silicon substrate and films of polysilicon or silicon nitride are employed as the structural materials. Other techniques that may be used include a wafer bonding process, where a patterned wafer is bonded to a handle wafer with a pre deposited layer, creating transducer cell cavity. Atomic Layer Deposition can also be utilized when combined with diffusion bonding technique. Unlike conventional CMUTs that consist of one moving membrane and a fixed bottom electrode, our research team proposes a configuration that employs multiple moving membranes (M3-CMUT) and one static electrode. It is shown that this new design greatly enhances the transducer effective capacitance by reducing the effective cavity height that directly influences the generated acoustic power, and sensitivity. In our research project, capacitive transducers have been fabricated using MEMS sacrificial technique, PolyMUMPs. The fabricated chips include single cell CMUTs and M3-CMUTs as well as 1-D and 2-D arrays. The selected frequency of operation for these new transducers is between 600 kHz to 5 MHz. To fully characterize the transducer properties, electrical measurements need to be performed. Agilent Impedance Analyzer, Source Measure Unit, Arbitrary Waveform Generator, Digital Oscilloscope, Current Amplifier, Bias-T, and Probe Station will be used to measure the transducer impedance and capacitance under various bias conditions (DC voltage from 0 V up to 80 V). The resonant frequency of various transducers with different dimensions and geometry is explored during the impedance measurements. The device resonant frequencies, quality factors, as well as the breakdown voltages will be extracted from impedance measurements. Optical measurements have been also performed using a Laser Vibrometer System to investigate membrane vibration modes. The results found from electrical and optical measurements will be compared with each other as well as with the developed analytical model and COMSOL simulations. Acoustic measurements will be performed for both air and immersion mode transducers using Hydrophone, commercial air coupled transducers, XYZ positioner, power amplifier, and digital oscilloscope. Transducers will be characterized in transmission as well as receiver mode. Beam shape and width will be measured at different distances from the transducers. Acoustic power of the fabricated transducers will be measured while operating in transmitting mode. The transducer sensitivity will be characterized in response to an incoming acoustic wave and when operating in receiver mode. The effect of DC bias voltage on transducers power generation capability and sensitivity will also be investigated. Power distribution failure is one of the key factors of electrical power interruption and effective preventive maintenance can increase system reliability. Among the distribution failures, one of the major causes is water treeing in the Cross-Linked Polyethylene (XLPE) insulation of underground power cables. Water trees are regarded as being microfissures around water droplets within the XLPE insulation and their chemical composition varies depending on the type of soil the underground cable is buried in. What is important to note here is that the composition of the water tree is different from the insulation and this then causes a contrast that can permit the detection and/or imaging of these faults. In order to detect water trees, dissection is used to determine the electrical integrity of this insulation. The number and length of trees determine the condition of the insulation and this information help field staff with decisions to prioritize replacement of the cable. However, the current dissection method can be quite time consuming, also the sample is destroyed in this process and cannot be reused. Our research team considers ultrasound technology as an effective alternative to the currently used dissection technique for fault detection in underground power cables. This Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) approach can be effectively used for many imaging applications and for the detection and location of various objects and materials. They are also shown beneficial in medical fields, such as breast cancer tumor detection. Ultrasonic technology generally employs transducers to generate an acoustic signal, which travels in the surrounding media and reflects back from the object. The returning signal is usually collected with the same transducer operating in a receiver mode. Traditionally, piezoelectric transducers have been employed for imaging purposes, e.g. underwater high resolution non-coherent sonar imaging, and contrast enhanced ultrasound medical imaging. However, piezoelectric transducers are known to have several drawbacks such as poor acoustic matching, dimensional limitation, temperature dependency, and limited uniformity arising from fabrication difficulties In the past decade, an alternative electrostatic, capacitive transducer was introduced to overcome some of the known piezoelectric transducers drawbacks. Capacitive transducers can be fabricated using Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) technology. The advantages associated with employing MEMS ultrasonic transducers compared to the conventional piezo transducers include a much broader application area, a wider bandwidth with an improved resolution in imaging applications, better acoustic matching, and a highly miniaturized system. In addition, these transducers have been shown to considerably improve product uniformity when compared to the piezoelectric transducers. Our research project is concentrated on development of a novel capacitive micromachined transducer prototype with the characteristics needed for Synthetic Aperture (SA) imaging, as well as improving the properties of these transducers. These improvements include enhancing the detection properties, improving electrical safety, beam forming techniques, beam steering capability, and improving the transducer effective capacitance. Students will be trained to use electronic lab facilities and will conduct supervised electrical measurements. They will be expected to be able to use lab equipment and will be in charge of conducting impedance and capacitive measurements. They will perform supervised analyze of the measured data and will extract transducer properties for various designs and geometries and will compare the information on conventional transducers with the multiple moving membrane transducers. They will be trained to use optical table and acoustic measurement equipment and will conduct acoustic measurements under various conditions using commercial transducers. Students are expected to become familiar with electronics lab equipment and be able to conduct supervised electrical and acoustic measurements using Agilent Impedance Analyzer, Source Measure Unit, Arbitrary Waveform Generator, Digital Oscilloscope, Current Amplifier, Bias-T, Probe Station Hydrophone, Commercial Air-Coupled Transducers, Optical Table, and XYZ Positioner. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of Manitoba – Winnipeg Manitoba Douglas Buchanan 0 1 Manitoba Hydro, CancerCare Manitoba French Contribution aux recherches du Réseau d’études internationales sur la valorisation et l’exploitation de la nature, des terres et des ressources en Afrique, Asie et Amérique latine (RÉINVENTERRA) La recherche s'arrime à la création d'un réseau de recherche qui permette de renouveler le champ d’études sur l’exploitation et l’appropriation des ressources naturelles, en particulier le domaine du foncier/agriculture, et des mines. L’ambition de ce réseau (RÉINVENTERRA), et des études de cas locales qui sont conduites, est de décloisonner les approches sectorielles, géographiques et scalaires, tout en mobilisant les connaissances afin d’améliorer les pratiques, les cadres juridiques et les politiques. Les dynamiques contemporaines soulevées par l’accès et le contrôle des ressources ont des conséquences multiples et interreliées. Les impacts sociaux et environnementaux s’imbriquent à la transformation des systèmes fonciers et des dynamiques sociales locales. Ces transformations peuvent accentuer ou créer des clivages entre les acteurs et de nouvelles stratifications au sein de groupes considérés auparavant comme homogènes (i.e les communautés locales), ce qui remet en question les catégories ontologiques de l’analyse (Alonso-Fradejas, 2012 : 503). L’émergence de ces nouvelles fractures et frontières débouche sur de nouvelles formes de négociation, sur la mobilisation des acteurs de la base et sur des conflits parfois violents (Peluso et Lund, 2011, Bebbington et al., 2008; Campbell, 2004; 2006; Canel et al., 2010; David et Gagné, 2007; Elharawy, 2008; Szablowski, 2007), tout en redéfinissant, plus fondamentalement le lieu du politique (Kerkvliet, 2009). À notre connaissance, il n’existe, dans les milieux de la recherche au Canada, aucune structure qui tente d’articuler rigoureusement les diverses perspectives sectorielles, les niveaux d’analyse et les particularités d’études de cas dans trois régions géographiques (Afrique, Amérique latine et Asie du Sud-Est). La mise sur pied de REINVENTERRA vient donc combler une lacune. Ce réseau permettra de développer des approches intersectorielles et interrégionales sur les questions de l’accès à la terre et aux ressources et des transformations des formes d’appropriation et de mise en valeur de ces dernières. L’originalité de REINVENTERRA repose sur sa capacité d’aller au-delà de la mise en parallèle des études de cas provenant de trois continents en explicitant les interfaces entre les différents apports disciplinaires, méthodologiques, sectoriels et conceptuels. La programmation scientifique utilise trois points d’entrée complémentaires constituant autant d’axes de recherche (réf. Tableau 1) : 1) Dynamiques d’appropriation au niveau local; 2) Dynamiques institutionnelles, et 3) Dynamiques d’adaptation et de résistance. Les entités de recherche responsables de l’élaboration de ce programme réunissent des chercheurs spécialisés autour de deux grandes thématiques : domaine foncier/agroindustriel et secteur extractif. REINVENTERRA vise à formuler des réponses plus appropriées et pérennes aux transformations en cours pour désamorcer des situations souvent extrêmement conflictuelles, comme c’est le cas, en Asie du Sud-Est concernant l’accaparement des terres, et plus spécifiquement : les relations de pouvoir entre les parties – ou stakeholders , les tensions sociales au sein des populations rurales, les impacts environnementaux, les revendications des minorités ethniques basées sur des droits ancestraux, et de manière plus générale, la transformation des modes de vie dans le milieu agraire. Professeure d’économie politique au Département de science politique de l’Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Bonnie Campbell est aussi directrice du Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche en développement international et société (CIRDIS) et également du Groupe de recherche sur les activités minières en Afrique (GRAMA). Elle est spécialiste des enjeux d'économie politique et de développement, tout particulièrement en Afrique. Sa carrière est composée d'une large réflexion sur les ressources naturelles et leurs impacts sur le développement des pays du Sud. Les analyses issues de ses recherches visent généralement à alimenter la réflexion des décideurs et des intervenants sur le terrain, ainsi qu’à jouer un rôle de conseil auprès du secteur privé et des organisations de la société civile, tant au Canada qu’à l’international. À titre d’illustration, avec la publication Enjeux des nouvelles réglementations minières en Afrique (Uppsala (Suède), Nordic Africa Institute, 2004), B. Campbell a été invitée à intervenir à titre d’experte auprès de différents milieux de décision, dont la Commission des Nations Unies pour le commerce et le développement et la Société financière internationale (Groupe de la Banque mondiale). Elle a également été nommée en 2006 par le ministère des Affaires étrangères et du Commerce international du Canada comme l’un des deux membres universitaires du Comité consultatif qui a produit le rapport Tables rondes nationales sur la responsabilité sociale et l’industrie extractive dans les pays en développement (2007) et fut membre de l’International Study Group sur la révision des régimes miniers en Afrique de la Commission économique pour l’Afrique des Nations Unies (2007-2011). Ses principaux ouvrages ont directement permis de formuler des recommandations politiques sur les conditions permettant la contribution des activités minières à l’atteinte des objectifs de développement en Afrique. Voir notamment : Mining in Africa : Regulation and Development (Londres, Pluto Press, Ottawa, CRDI et Uppsala, Nordic Africa Institute, 2009) (traduit et publié en français en 2010) qui a également contribué au renforcement des liens et des échanges que le GRAMA et le CIRDIS ont établis avec des instances diverses dont les stratégies et politiques permettront la continuation d’échanges réciproques très fructueux, notamment avec la Commission économique pour l’Afrique des Nations Unies (UNECA) concernant la mise en valeur du secteur extractif de ce continent. Ces travaux et projets de recherches sur l’Afrique auront contribué au développement d’une perspective comparative avec le Canada et le Québec, dont les résultats sont parus dans Pouvoir et régulation dans le secteur minier: leçons à partir de l’expérience canadienne (avec M. Laforce et B. Sarrasin, Québec, PUQ, 2012), qui questionne les modes de régulation des projets miniers et leurs impacts sur les communautés à partir de l’expérience du Canada. En parallèle, depuis bon nombre d’années, B. Campbell poursuit des travaux portant sur les réformes institutionnelles qui ont accompagné les stratégies de réforme macroéconomique mises en œuvre dans les pays du Sud. Ce domaine de recherche est aussi mené en dialogue avec les milieux de décision, de recherche et d’intervention. En mai 2015, les équipes nationales se réuniront afin de mettre en commun leurs analyses liées aux études de cas menées sur le terrain (Afrique, Amérique latine, Asie). Ces équipes seront chargées de réaliser un compte-rendu qui sera présenté au mois de septembre à l'UQAM lors d'une conférence internationale qui réunira l'ensemble des partenaires de la recherche. Le travail de l'étudiant s’insérera directement dans la préparation de cette rencontre, en alimentant la recherche globale afin de produire les documents préparatoire à la rencontre du mois de septembre. L'étudiant participera de manière active à la revue de littérature portant sur les enjeux de l'exploitation et l'appropriation des ressources naturelles, en particulier le domaine du foncier/agriculture, et des mines. À cette étape, il nous est encore difficile de préciser les thèmes précis de la recherche puisqu'ils seront directement liés aux résultats des études de cas présentés par les partenaires lors des ateliers nationaux en mai 2015. L'étudiant, en collaboration avec l'équipe du CIRDIS, fera avancer la recherche sur l'arrimage entre les résultats de ces études et la recherche plus globale poursuivie par l'équipe du CIRDIS qui est dirigée par la professeure Bonnie Campbell. L'objectif étant l'approfondissement des connaissances sur la thématique de recherche et la participation au processus politique canadien et international. De plus, l'étudiant sera également appelé à offrir un soutien logistique à l'adjointe à la direction du CIRDIS dans la préparation et la coordination de la rencontre du mois de septembre 2015 qui comprend des ateliers de travail fermé avec les partenaires internationaux de la recherche et une conférence grand public afin d'ouvrir le dialogue entre les partenaires et le public canadien intéressé par ces enjeux. L'étudiant devra avoir un esprit de synthèse, d'analyse politique et une facilité au niveau de la recherche documentaire et de la production écrite. Expérience en recherche documentaire et rédaction souhaitable. Connaissance des enjeux de développement international, liés aux problématiques des ressources naturelles, de gestion des territoires et d'accaparement des terres serait un atout. Autonome et capable de travailler en équipe, il devra avoir des connaissances connexes du domaine au niveau international et dans les pays en développement. Excellent français. Connaissance de l'anglais pour la lecture. 4 mai, 2015 24 juillet, 2015 Université du Québec à Montréal – Montréal Québec Bonnie Campbell 0 0 null English ROBOTIC INTERFACE WITH HAPTIC GUIDANCE AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES Children with motor impairments have difficulty with object manipulation and miss developmental opportunities for meaningful exploration or interaction. For example, children who have severe cerebral palsy may have limitations that prevent them from grasping objects or prevent them from being able to touch an object exactly where and how they would like. The absence of manipulation can limit children to learning primarily by observing activities, resulting in missed cognitive and perceptual development opportunities, and learned helplessness. In Dr. Adams' research, children with disabilities have used mobile and robotic arms for exploration and manipulation of the environment. The robot controllers were adapted so that children could control the robots by pressing switches operated by hand, head, or leg movements depending on their motor skills. However, the robots had limitations. In this project we are investigating if the use of a robot interface with haptic guidance and adaptable control levels will allow children with motor impairments to enhance performance in object manipulation tasks. Overall project objectives: 1) Develop sensation-rich haptic interfaces and robots (for feeling environments and other users); 2) Develop new methods and approaches for modulating the impact of a child's control; and 3) Conduct trials with children who have disabilities to validate the system’s efficacy. The project proposed here supports the technical development required for Objective 1: For Objective 1, Dr. Tavakoli has extensive experience in dual-user haptic-guided cooperation allowing two users to collaboratively control a robot via two haptic interfaces. The robot’s position is the sum of two user interface positions weighted by a and 1- a; 0 a 1 specifying the relative “control authority” of the two users. The robot/environment interaction force is also split and fed back to the users. Thus, a affects how the two users contribute to the robot position and what share of force feedback each of them receives. We will investigate effective position and force sharing strategies in dual-user haptic teleoperation involving a disabled child user and an adult user that facilitate motor learning. Specifically, we will explore the progressive approaches to haptic guidance for training where the control gains and authority scales are adjusted based on user’s performance in order to provide appropriate levels of haptic guidance throughout training to the trainee. Dr. Tavakoli has researched the design [1,2], analysis [3,4], and control [5-8] of haptic human-machine interfaces and bilateral teleoperation systems to facilitate optimum use of various sensing modalities of humans, including haptics (sense of touch) and vision, thereby enabling more efficient, accurate, and safe operation. His areas of research also include studying human task performance during teleoperation [7,9-11], and the design and control of multilateral haptic teleoperation systems. This background informs the present research project and, with respect to dual-user haptic teleoperation (described below), Dr. Tavakoli has investigated the passivity of multilateral haptic systems involving haptic information sharing between multiple users [12]. The developed methods are applicable to the special case of N = 3, a dual-user haptic interface system for control of a single teleoperated robot, as in the proposed study. He has studied the stability of these trilateral teleoperation systems [13] and their performance. Dr. Adams holds a Joint Assistive Technology position between the Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Alberta (UofA), where she is an Assistant Professor, and the Alexsandar Kostov Assistive Technology Research Lab at the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital, where she does research in conjunction with the I Can Centre for Assistive Technology. Her background is electrical engineering and practiced in the area of assistive technology clinical delivery and design for 20 years prior to returning to academia. Dr. Adams' research interests include augmentative and alternative communication, assistive technology design, and development. A major research thrust is using assistive robots for children with physical and cognitive disabilities to engage in play and learning activities [13-18]. http://www.rehabresearch.ualberta.ca/assistivetechnology/ [1] Tavakoli M, Patel RV, Moallem M. 2006;9(2-3):160-176. [2] Tavakoli M, Patel RV, Moallem M. Int J Med Rob Com Assis Surg 2005;1(2):53-63. [3] Tavakoli M, Howe RD. Int J Rob Res 2009;28(10):1289-1302. [4] Tavakoli M, Aziminejad A, Patel RV, Moallem M. IET Cont Theo Appl 2008;2(6):496-512. [5] Le MQ, Pham MT, Tavakoli M, Moreau R, Simon J-P, Redarce T. 2012 [6] Liu X, Tavakoli M. Adv Rob 2011;25(13-14). [7] Tavakoli M, Aziminejad A, Patel RV, Moallem M. IEEE Trans Sys Man Cyber-Part B 2007;37(6):1512-1528. [8] Aziminejad A, Tavakoli M. Int J Fact Autom Rob Soft Comp 2008;1:60-69. [9] Yip MC, Tavakoli M, Howe RD. Adv Rob 2011;25(5):651-673. [10] Tavakoli M, Patel RV, Moallem M. 2005; Toronto, Canada. p 1-6 [11] Tavakoli M, Patel RV, Moallem M. 2005 March Pisa, Italy [12] Mendez V, Tavakoli M. 2010 December Atlanta, GA. [13] Li J, Tavakoli M, Huang Q. IEEE Transactions on Haptics Under review. [14] Adams K, Cook A. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology 2014;9(4):286-298. [15] Adams K, Cook A. Technology and Disability In press. [16] Cook A, Adams K, Encarnação P, Alvarez L. Developmental Neurorehabilitation 2012;15(2):136–148. [17] Cook A, Adams K, Volden J, Harbottle N, Harbottle C. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology 2011;6(4):338-46. [18] Cook A, Encarnação P, Adams K. Technology and Disability 2010;22(3):127-145. Throughout the project students will be valuable members of the research team, participating and contributing, and leading whenever possible. As the students gain more skills, they will begin to take on more responsibility. The student will be part of the set-up phase, providing support and contributions for planning, and technical implementation. The student will participate in technical trials and prepare the resulting technical specifications for the second phase of the project. The student will participate in team meetings for planning and discussion of results. There will also be bi-weekly project implementation progress meetings with Adams and Tavakoli. The students will have workstations at Adams' labs at the University of Alberta and the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital. This will facilitate exposure to both the academic environment and an interdisciplinary assistive technology team that works directly with children who have disabilities. The student will have opportunities to engage with front staff in discussions, to present research results, and for authorship on dissemination activities. Familiarity with C/C++ programming, knowledge of control systems, familiarity with mathematical models of physical systems, hands-on skills 1 May, 2015 31 August, 2015 University of Alberta – Edmonton Alberta Mahdi Tavakoli 0 1 Kinova Robotics English Clinical implementation of BOLD MRI CVR The primary hypothesis of the research project is: “The spatial distribution of impaired vascular reserve in AD will differ from age matched controls in a specific pattern that reflects the regional vulnerability of brain regions to this disease.” The research plan includes subjects with clinically determined mild cognitive impairment (MCI), AD, and age-matched controls who will undergo cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) imaging in MRI, arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI for measuring resting blood flow, and high resolution images for gray matter (GM) volumetry. Atlases will be developed for the AD and age-matched control groups to determine if spatial differences exist that distinguish them. Comparison of MCI patients will be performed against these atlases to predict the likelihood of progression to AD. Machine learning classifiers will be created using training, validation, and testing data sets to determine the diagnostic efficacy of CVR compared to resting CBF and GM volume measurements. Machine learning is a rapidly developing branch of artificial intelligence that analyzes data from groups of individuals whose diagnosis is already known, to produce classifiers capable of prospectively predicting group membership for new individuals whose diagnosis is not yet known. The data used for prediction in our work is based on imaging metrics such as CVR. The MITACS student will be involved with the research team as it develops and applies the machine learning classifier. The predictive power of the classifier for identifying the subset of subjects with mild cognitive impairment who go on to develop AD will be tested as the conversion of MCI to AD data is collected over the upcoming year. The MITACS student will assist in the analysis of this data and provide a progress report at the end of next summer. The value to the student derives from the opportunity to observe and participate in a high level imaging research environment. If the work is successful, the student will have participated in the development of a biomarker enabling earlier diagnosis and management of AD. We believe this is a terrific opportunity for the student to observe translational research in action. Dementia is defined as cognitive impairment severe enough to interfere with social function and activities of daily living, representing a clear change from a prior level of functioning. As the population ages, the proportion developing dementia will increase dramatically underscoring the urgent need for improved diagnostics and therapeutics. Cerebral vasculature plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of both vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s dementia (AD). The focus of future AD research should include investigation of the relationship between the vasculature and the neurons, i.e. “the neurovascular unit” in order to fully characterize the pathobiology of this disease. Our research is focused on studying not only disordered blood flow but, disordered blood flow control in patients with pre-dementia. A highly developed tool that has been the focus of our laboratory’s efforts over the last 12 years can investigate the control of brain blood flow in a way that cannot be easily achieved with any other modality. This assessment may help to distinguish the relative contribution of vascular dysfunction in the dementia subtypes. As a potential biomarker, assessment of the extent of vascular dysfunction would be useful for: 1) defining the initiating events in dementia - vascular vs neuronal, 2) assessing the efficacy of potential treatments including vascular therapies, and 3) providing an earlier diagnosis. Since resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) may be normal in early dementia, the specific aim of our research is to move beyond resting CBF assessment. We apply an imaging tool that has proven successful in measuring impairments in the blood flow control mechanism itself including diseases such as cervico-cerebral atherosclerosis, moyamoya disease, vasculitis, arteriovenous malformations, tumor neovasculature, and pseudotumor cerebri. We have developed a standardized vascular challenge that can quantitate and map vascular reserve throughout the brain through induction of precise and repeatable changes in the arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (CO2) during Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) MRI. The CBF response to the powerful vasodilatory effect of CO2 is quantified using the BOLD signal as a flow surrogate. This method assesses the impact that vascular disease has on the neurovascular unit. The next logical step for this technology is in the assessment of dementia. The main challenge is to determine if and how well BOLD MRI CVR can differentiate AD subjects from age matched controls compared to existing imaging benchmarks. The secondary goal is to gauge the performance of the tool in predicting conversion of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects to AD. If our research shows this to be feasible, it will provide justification to validate the imaging method as a biomarker and prognostic tool for AD and test it against other varieties of MCI and dementia. There are currently no methods available for accurately predicting the type of dementia a patient with MCI will develop. This becomes more important as new disease specific therapies are developed with the intent to treat early in the disease in order to slow or even prevent further loss of cognitive function. 1. Work closely with computational scientist Dr. Dufort to become familiar with machine learning concepts. 2. Assist in the development, implementation, and interpretation of a machine learning classifier using pilot CVR data set. 3. Assist in the generation of a manuscript using this method earning a co- authorship in a future publication. 4. Present the results of this work at the end of the summer at our laboratory meeting. 5. Encourage a poster submission to a national or international neuroscience meeting such as the Society for Neuroscience or the American Society of Functional Neuroradiology As in any research lab, new comers need to assimilate information rather quickly especially for the MITACS student since there is only a 12 week term. A good command of English is needed and a science background is necessary. It is also necessary for the candidate to have basic computer skills including word processing and presentation development (i.e. Powerpoint). Students with specific backgrounds in computer science, engineering, or neuroscience are preferred. 1 May, 2015 1 September, 2015 University of Toronto – Toronto Ontario David MIkulis 0 1 Thornhill Research Inc. English Exploration Geochemistry: Statistical Variability of Inorganic and Organic Responses in Surface Soils. The collection and chemical analysis of surface soils is one of the key pillars of mineral exploration programs and has played a significant role in the discovery of a considerable number of mineral deposits. However, surface deposits are being depleted, leading to a requirement to find deeper mineral deposits or deposits buried under exotic materials such as glacial till, sand or gravel. In contrast to past experience, buried deposits often have subtle responses and signatures that are difficult to identify and distinguish against the natural background. Reducing and minimising the underlying variability or noise in a geochemical dataset could enhance the contrast between a subtle anomalous response from mineralisation and the natural background. Controls introduced into the sample preparation and analytical procedures such as time-temperature-pH controlled chemical digestions, high quality instrumental calibrations and internal and external quality control programs minimise variability once a sample is in the laboratory. However, one of the fundamental components in the complete process that has received scant attention is the variability inherent in the original sample collection process itself. This process, little changed over the last 50 years, consists of digging a single shallow hole at pre-determined coordinates to ~50cm to collect a specific soil horizon for chemical analysis. Only a rudimentary attempt is made during this process to establish overall sampling variability with the use of occasional field duplicates and attempt is made to determine if the sample collected was actually representative of the material at the sampling site even within the error of the original GPS location (~15m). This research program will comprise the collection of a suite of 49 samples from a sample site known to be anomalous and 49 samples from a site considered to be background. The samples will be collected from the upper-B horizon on a 7 x 7 sample regular grid with a 2.5 meter sample separation. Samples will be screened in the field to 2mm and submitted to commercial laboratories for drying, secondary screening (180µ) and conventional weak digests with organic and inorganic chemical analysis. Sample masses, pH, ORP, Cl and conductivity will be measured in the field. Analytical results will be statistically evaluated to determine the variability of each component at the two sample sites. Application of Gy’s sampling theory will allow for the estimation of the appropriate size sample and number of increments that should be collected in a survey in order to collect a representative sample and minimize natural noise within a survey. The results of this research have direct applications in the minerals industry with respect to defining appropriate sampling practises for conventional soil samples in geochemical exploration programs. This project represents the first attempt to apply classic sampling theory, widely used in industrial mining operations, to the collection of geochemical exploration soil samples potentially leading to improved success in mineral exploration for buried mineralisation. The discovery of new mineral resources requires increasing risk, increasing costs, and increasingly effective exploration techniques. Exploration activity itself is increasingly focused in difficult locations including those covered by transported material. This transported material comprises young glacial tills and sediments over much of northern latitude countries such as in Canada as well as sands and gravel deposits in more arid terrains. These materials effectively bury mineralisation and prevent the generation of typical residual geochemical anomalies, which have formed the backbone to much of mineral exploration over the last 70years. Although organic and inorganic geochemical responses and microbiological anomalies are reported in some instances in soils above buried mineralisation, the processes for the generation of these responses are poorly understood. As a result of this poor understanding of the processes, the environments in which the process are applicable, and appropriate detection methodologies, there has been a concomitant limited application by the mineral exploration industry of “through-cover” geochemical exploration techniques. This is further exacerbated by the high failure rate in identifying known mineralisation (false-negatives) coupled with the generation of anomalies due to other, often unexplained, reasons (false-positives). The targeting of false-positives results in frustrating, expensive and time-consuming non-productive drilling. The overall research program examines the relationship between mineralisation at the transported overburden-rock interface and the response at the surface with the use of chemical, biological, mineralogical and geophysical tools. Using a combination of field and experimental laboratory work, the research will develop a source-pathway-sink concept examining the overburden above mineralisation in three dimensions. The research will identify and define the processes that form and preserve anomalies on the surface. The development of process models will lead to the generation of improved and applicable commercial methods and technologies to detect the anomalies. These methods may include improved sample preparation and chemical analysis methods; new chemical leaches; or novel techniques based on the analysis of bacterial genes. To suite the requirements of industry, the methods will be efficient, cost effective and practical. In addition research will identify the processes which lead to the generation of false-positive anomalies, such as lithological variability and environmental variability and will develop methodologies to distinguish genuine from false responses. These developments will result in improved targeting capabilities leading to reduced drilling costs and improved exploration success for the exploration and mining industry. The current research program is strongly supported by the mining industry and commercial laboratories, the latter of whom committed extensive funding to initiate the program. The program operates inside the Mineral Deposit Research Unit (MDRU), a wholly industry sponsored collaborative unit inside the EOAS department at UBC. The student will participate in the design of test work to understand variability in chemical signatures related to mineral exploration geochemical anomalies including design of the quality control program (~0.5 week). Field work will be undertaken by the student (under supervision) in British Columbia collecting +/-50 soil samples based on the survey design. The student will be responsible for the collection, preparation and submission of the samples to commercial laboratories along with appropriate QA/QC following standard mineral industry practices. This will include survey layout, digging sample holes (~50cm), describing and collecting the appropriate soil horizon, screening the soil, site restoration, and pH-Conductivity-ORP-Cl measurements in the field. Full training in field methods will be provided. (~2 weeks). Whilst samples are being analysed the student will review relevant literature on previous studies and write up the field work observations and summary of previous work in addition to an evaluation of the pH, ORP, Cl and conductivity field data. In addition the student will visit one of the supporting commercial laboratories to review the preparation and analytical procedures and understand the inherent analytical variability(~3 weeks). The Student will undertake statistical evaluation of the geochemical results to understand local geochemical variability using simple statistics, univariate and bivariate methods and GIS (on commercial software) (~3.5 weeks) The student will prepare a final report on the study and give a departmental presentation. The student will prepare the report with the intention of publication in the international Geochemistry, Exploration, Environment, Analysis Journal. (~3 weeks). Geology / Earth Sciences / Science background. Understanding of basic statistics (mean, median, standard deviation). Basic knowledge of inorganic chemistry (e.g. undergraduate course subject). Will be based in the field for ~2 weeks. The student will be expected to formally report the results as a written report as well as a presentation to faculty. The student will be expected to contribute significantly as a principle author to an article for publication. 1 June, 2015 31 August, 2015 University of British Columbia – Vancouver British Columbia Peter Winterburn 0 1 ACME Analytical Laboratories, Activation Laboratories. ALS-Minerals. English (Super)Computing the Universe: Tracing the Formation and Evolution of Cosmic Structure My research group uses powerful supercomputers to simulate the formation and evolution of cosmic structure over the course of the past 13 billion years. We use these simulations to investigate how and when galaxies form, how they are drawn by gravity to form groups and massive clusters, how are they impacted by explosions engendered by dying stars and supermassive black holes, and do the galaxies in turn affect their environments? This research project involves analyzing outputs of cosmological numerical simulations to study one or more of these questions. We will also compare the simulation results to observations to see how well our models describe the real universe. The largest bound objects in the universe, galaxy groups and clusters represent both an opportunity and a challenge to current models of structure formation and efforts to map out the cosmic expansion history. By the virtue of being rich concentrations of galaxies, luminous X-ray sources as well as sources of distortions in the cosmic microwave background, the most massive of these systems are easy to identify over a wide range of redshifts. This, combined with the expectation that their number density has evolved rapidly during the recent past, makes them valuable probes for constraining cosmological parameters. Until recently, these studies were premised on the assumption that clusters are relatively simple systems, containing a cosmologically representative amount of baryons primarily in the form of accretion-shock heated gas in hydrostatic equilibrium. However, as multi-wavelength observations of galaxy clusters have improved, it is increasingly clear that this is not at all the case. The idealized model has three main failings, which have come to be called the entropy problem, the cooling flow problem, and the enrichment problem. At present, there is no satisfactory model for the formation and evolution of galaxy clusters that simultaneously addresses all three of these problems, accounts for the observed variations in the cluster population, and offers viable evolutionary trajectories. The physics governing the evolution of the baryons in clusters is simply not well understood. The ambiguity associated with whether observed indications of cluster evolution is due purely to local baryon physics or whether it is due to cosmological effects poses a serious challenge to, for example, efforts to use clusters as cosmological probes. The problem almost certainly lies in our lack of understanding of galaxy formation processes, particularly feedback processes, and how these impact the properties of the warm-hot diffuse gas surrounding the galaxies. This is not a new idea and several research groups have incorporated feedback processes in their structure formation models. However, most studies rely on ad hoc schemes tuned to reproduce a limited set of observations, such as the X-ray properties of galaxy groups. In a hierarchical structure formation framework, however, the effects of feedback are not confined to the targeted scale. In particular, galaxy properties are especially sensitive to the details of feedback and most extent feedback schemes used in group and cluster modeling fail to yield galaxy populations compatible with observations. I am currently working towards establishing a holistic solution to the entropy, cooling flow, and enrichment problems in galaxy groups and clusters within a hierarchical structure formation framework that concurrently correctly describes the galaxy properties. My high-level goals are: (1) Establish a unified description for the evolution of galaxies and the hot diffuse gas in group and cluster environments; (2) Determine key observable signatures that constrain the interplay between hierarchical growth and galaxy feedback processes. Working closely with myself and other members of my research group, the student will primarily be involved in analyzing the numerical simulation outputs as well as constructing images and animated gifs corresponding to time history of, for example, structure formation in the universe. (1) Must be a student in engineering, physics or astronomy (2) Must be intelligent, hard-working and self-motivated (3) Familiarity with programming would be an asset. 4 May, 2015 12 July, 2015 University of Victoria – Victoria British Columbia Arif Babul 0 0 null English Natural Language Processing Methods For Clinical Genomics Genomics technologies can advance cancer care, and reduce associated costs. However, there are important challenges to overcome before realizing this vision, such as the interpretation of analysis results in a clinically actionable way. Especially for rare cancers and orphaned diseases, rapid and accurate determination of a clinical decision is crucial. Many leading laboratories around the world, including ours at the British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA), are developing bioinformatics pipelines to translate high throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies to the clinical domain. Arguably, the last step in these pipelines – associating the identified variations and mutations with the patient’s underlying clinical condition – is the least developed, and very much a manual process. We aim to automate this process. The main objective of this project is to develop a natural language processing (NLP) platform to prepare clinical reports, and to annotate them within the context of relevant biomedical literature. The project has the following specific aims: 1. Integrate existing text parsing and computational linguistics methods, and adapt them to domain-specific literature; 2. Develop informal logic methods to analyze, assess and appraise information related to the specific genomic profiles of a patient and his/her cancer. Today, there are 3 million biomedical records in PubMed associated with cancer, with over 150,000 new records added yearly. Researchers around the world actively contribute to this growing body of knowledge using modern genomics technologies. Today a clinical researcher has to read several papers a day, and digest the message of each, just to keep abreast with new publications on a particular cancer type. This is clearly impractical. The key innovation in our project is to automate this process, and provide a decision support system for clinical genomics. Thus, in the broader sense, our work will address the issue of information overload affecting all researchers, including the clinical practitioners embracing HTS technologies. In the short term, the clinically validated analytics capacity we will develop will clear a critical hurdle, and allow for personalized genomics applications. In addition to being an enabling technology, such automation schemes have the potential to reduce the overall cost of healthcare delivery, reverting an unsustainable trend. Notwithstanding some laudable efforts such as the IBM Watson Project, artificial intelligence tools have not made significant inroads into the healthcare domain to mine this valuable resource, and the IBM project does not target genomics technologies. So far, the primary focus of leading research laboratories has been on developing scalable and accurate bioinformatics tools to analyze large volumes of sequencing data. With this project, we are taking a leap to build tools for automated interpretation of these analysis results. The technologies we will develop in this project will be trained on the large volume of data generated at the BCCA. They include whole genome and transcriptome sequencing data from leukemia cohorts, and amplicon sequencing data from a gene panel for hereditary cancer screening. The deliverables of this project will be provided to the public through an open source paradigm. The overall mission of the Bioinformatics Technology Lab (BTL) at the Genome Sciences Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency is the development of innovative computing technologies and bioinformatics pipelines, with an emphasis on studying cancer and other diseases, advancing knowledge in the life sciences. For a century, methods of determining the number, appearance, and rough structure of chromosomes have proven to be useful in clinical applications. With the human genome sequenced a decade ago, the research community gained a reference for single nucleotide-level comparisons that provide unprecedented insights into biological phenomena in our cells. Building upon this reference, the development of high throughput sequencing (HTS) platforms has significantly benefited clinical genomics in general, and cancer genomics in particular. In the span of a decade, the development of HTS platforms in clinical settings has quickly advanced from concept and pilot stages to a practiced reality. However, significant challenges remain in the bioinformatics domain before a wider uptake of the technology can occur. These challenges centre around improving and translating the best practices in data analysis methods explored in research settings to the clinical domain; and communicating routine and novel bioinformatics results effectively and efficiently to clinical practitioners. In this context members of the BTL concentrate on three equally important issues related to (1) speed, (2) accuracy, and (3) reporting of bioinformatics analyses.The structure and long-term outlook of the research lab aligns with these three challenges to facilitate a successful translation of bioinformatics technologies to the clinical domain. As such, BTL is composed of three teams focusing on three complementary (and often overlapping) topics: 1) High Performance Computing (HPC), 2) Clinical Bioinformatics (CB), and 3) Artificial Intelligence (AI). *The rapidly increasing volume of genomics data, and the need for clinically acceptable turnaround times, put a substantial strain on existing computational resources. The HPC team is developing algorithms to resolve this computational bottleneck. *The integration of genomics technologies into the clinical domain will require quantified and tightly controlled accuracy of the reported results. The CB team is experienced in methods validation and application of cutting-edge research tools in large cohort studies, and will extend this expertise to provide clinical bioinformatics pipelines with measurable performance. *Following the rapid expansion of sequencing capacity, the volume of scientific reports, as captured by research articles tracked in PubMed, is experiencing an exponential growth. The AI team is building supporting technologies to translate this rich information into clinically relevant knowledge. The Natural Language Processing project described in this proposal will be carried out in the AI team, but will have close interactions with and important contributions from the members of the lab in the other domains. The successful applicant will join a team of trainees, research scientists, and clinical researchers who are developing tools for a clinical genomics pipeline based on primary sequence analysis. The successful applicant’s specific role will be to build natural language processing and machine learning tools that interpret identified mutations for their biological significance as they relate to reports in the relevant literature. Reporting to the Head of Bioinformatics Technology Lab, the student’s typical duties will include the following: * Building NLP and machine learning tools for automated literature survey * Analysis and annotation of data from genomics studies as they relate to the literature * Collaborating with biologists and clinical researchers on the accuracy of the results * Reporting research methods and results in group meetings * Contributing to scientific reports, and potentially to publications Undergraduate students from Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, or a related science discipline will be considered. Pre-requisite courses: Natural Language Processing; Machine Learning; Artificial Intelligence. Prior exposure to genomics, bioinformatics, genetics or molecular biology would be an asset, but not required. The position is suitable for students with an interest in applying their skills in bioinformatics research at a high throughput sequencing centre. 1 May, 2015 1 September, 2015 University of British Columbia – Vancouver British Columbia Inanc Birol 0 0 null English LGBT Future Planning Project: Improving web access, online services and websafety for end-of-life planning by LGBT older adults What: By the Fall of 2014, we will have developed an online resource dedicated to providing resources, facilitating communication, and offering support to LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) persons in preparation for aging and end of life. The LGBT Future Planning Project (FPP) is aimed at creating a safe, reliable, and accessible web resource, influenced by sites such as caringbridge.com (an online caring network connecting friends and family with individuals dealing with significant health concerns) and NIDUS.ca (a BC personal planning resource directory). Why: This project derives from our own extensive research (CVs available), and that of our colleagues, showing that LGBT persons disproportionately age alone, with limited support, in a stigmatizing environment where they are often poorly served by traditional aging services and hesitant to avail themselves of the same. The result for LGBT older persons is poorer overall health with an associated reduced preparedness for end of life and fewer persons on whom they may call upon for support or seek information. Research also suggests a higher than national average web usage providing a natural opportunity as proposed herein. How: The website currently in construction is tailored to these unique experiences and needs of LGBT older adults fostering dialog, knowledge exchange and document preparation, connecting individuals to appropriate resources, and creating/nurturing community. LGBT agency and organization members (already part of the larger study) have been invited to the online site and encouraged to engage others, bolstered by additional outreach (e.g., in community and online groups, in LGBT publications, and health care settings). We believe this online resource will: • Offer a safe, LGBT-affirming place for guided end of life and caregiving discussions; the site will initially be moderated by trained LGBT community volunteers. This site will provide relevant information about end of life concerns with side links to secure discussion sections, partner organizations, and documents for preparing for end of life care. • Serve as an information source directing visitors to appropriate national resources, providing community-identified tools supporting care planning and expression of end of life wishes. • Offer a (initially moderated) comment board on issues surrounding these tools: challenges with, and suggestions for, downloads, completions and distribution. The electronic platform will be located on the website of the Gerontology Research Centre (GRC) at Simon Fraser University (SFU), similar to the INPEA secretariat website (International Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse: www.sfu.ca/grc/inpea/). It will be initially managed, maintained and hosted by staff and trained volunteers, setting the stage for subsequent take-over and ownership by community groups. Impact and Benefit: With permission from online participants, site usage, discussion foci, and achievement of purpose (e.g., relevant document downloads) will be assessed. Additionally, online evaluations will be included as a preliminary assessment of study and intervention efficacy. This project stands to benefit a community often overlooked and disparaged; it empowers individuals and fosters a sense of health care advocacy. The goals of this project, in alignment with the mission and vision of SFU (to be the leading engaged university defined by its dynamic integration of innovative education, cutting-edge research, and far-reaching community engagement), echo the call for efforts that include and benefit Canadians. We seek to assess the efficacy of an online platform for education, community-building and personal growth among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) older adults. This platform is currently in development, funded by the Technology Evaluation in the Elderly (TVN) National Centre of Excellence. Reaching out to and including historically disenfranchised, stigmatized and vulnerable LGBT older adults, the web resource is intended to create a safe space for LGBT older adults to seek and find tailored and supportive information and resources and ultimately to form community. From such a secure base, administered with SFU technology support, reliable and meaningful information will be made available in accessible and appropriate ways. Although initially formed around the particular needs and issues of LGBT older adults, it is clear that many of these issues pervade sexual orientation and gender identity and will have something that will benefit all. That is, having a safe, secure and stable place to turn with questions about end of life care and decisions is not a health and social need unique to LGBT older adults; based on the model proposed herein, other versions and websites may be created, tailored and offered to other groups with comparable concerns. In addition to the benefits accrued to LGBT older adults as a result of this project, networks of community organizations, universities and provincial agencies will be developed leading to further research and practice with potential benefits for all Canadians. We propose to have established a website with an emerging recognition and increasing usage. We will measure recognition by the frequency with which LGBT and other publications reference the site, and by referrals to the site by participants. With permission from online participants, site usage and achievement of purpose will also be assessed; data will include numbers signing onto the site, frequency of site visits, and frequency of linked end of life documents activated/downloaded. Qualitative analyses can address the nature of the discussion such as type of support identified as needed and offered and frequency of cross-communication (among participants—as suggestive evidence of community formation and engagement). Additionally, online evaluations will be included in the final months of the project as a preliminary assessment of study and intervention efficacy. The special needs required by the socially-sensitive project we propose include the following: • An awareness and acceptance of diversity among older adult populations • An understanding of the human life course, including end of life • An understanding of web-based platforms of knowledge exchange • An understanding of data analytic approaches to web-based exchanges The student is invited to be an active participate in the complete research program. By the time the student joins this research project, the site will have been constructed (based on a national, collaborative project ending in March 2015), launched and evaluated in a preliminary way. The goals of this proposed project will be the following: • a deeper examination of the patterns of use of the site (e.g., number of sign-ons, frequency of visits, length of visits, popular links) • a more thorough examination of the comment board and community functions (e.g., types of comments offered, strengths and weaknesses of the site) • An examination of the community links and web-based groups that have been established with links to this site. The activities described above are those that require skill sets (and willingness to develop such skill sets) described above. Based on these evaluations and assessments, new directions and updates to the site will likely be required and pilot tested. For example, new sites will likely be available to which this project could link, provincial and federal forms that site visitors have been encouraged to complete may have been revised and will need further description perhaps with fresh links, new stimuli form comments may be posted to encourage discussion on the site, new group pages may be required based on the responses previously posted. In all of these activities, the student will be instrumentally involved. These activities require conducting online literature and document searches, becoming familiar with diverse areas of scholarly and practical literatures (e.g., end-of-life, diverse communities, service providers), and an ability to integrate such diverse literatures. In all of these instances, the student will work with faculty colleagues and other graduate students, in a collaborative and team environment. The project requires of students: • An openness and willing to learn further about diversity among older adult populations • An openness and willing to learn further about the human life course, including end-of-life • A basic understanding of web-based platforms, including design, ways of rendering the site integrative and inviting, and monitoring of usage • A basic understanding of data analytic approaches to web-based exchanges, including ways of accessing data from site visits and downloads An interest in developing and/or learning about other data analytic and management strategies, including content analysis 1 May, 2015 1 June, 2015 Simon Fraser University – Vancouver British Columbia Gloria Gutman 0 0 null English Role of caspase-7 in colorectal cancer Many diseases, including cancer, afflict the intestines. This is in large part due to the continuous renewal of epithelial cells, and the exposure to toxins from the diet and to infectious agents. Inflammation also contributes to the genesis of cancer, as illustrated by the link between chronic and ulcerative colitis and colorectal cancer (CRC). Caspases, a family of cysteinyl peptidases, play a crucial role in both inflammation and cancer avoidance via cytokine productions and apoptosis (cell death), respectively. A growing body of evidence suggests that caspases play on all fronts to regulate inflammation and promote apoptosis whenever necessary. Recent studies showed that caspase-7, initially assigned to apoptosis, also contributes to inflammatory mechanisms. For instance, CASP7 gene ablation in mice causes resistance to endotoxic shock induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharides. This phenotype is recapitulated in animals carrying an amino acid substitution in the multifunctional enzyme poly(ADP ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP) gene that renders this protein resistant to caspase proteolysis. Moreover, a functional link between caspase-7, PARP and inflammation has been established. Thus, caspase-7 contributes to both inflammatory and apoptotic processes. Gene expression profiling revealed that caspase-7 mRNA levels are the highest in the intestines, but significantly diminished, or even abolished, in CRC compared to healthy tissue. These data suggest that caspase-7 could be a tumor suppressor, but this hypothesis must be verified. We propose studies that will determine the role of caspase-7 in the genesis and progression of CRC, and shed light on the underlying mechanisms. To this end, we propose three aims: Aim 1: Analyze caspase-7 expression and activity in different model cell lines of CRC We propose to compare the protein and gene expression of caspase-7 in non-immortalized intestinal epithelial cells and in a panel of human CRC cell lines that have distinct and well-defined tumorigenic and metastatic characteristics, as well as known genetic alterations. If detected, we will establish the functionality of the caspase in apoptosis induced by clinically relevant CRC chemotherapeutics. Aim 2: Define the contribution of caspase-7 to CRC progression We will evaluate the impact of the gain and the lost of function of caspase-7 on the phenotypes of cell lines identified in Aim 1. Caspase-7 expression will be restored by ectopic expression or ablated using shRNAs using lentiviruses. Proliferation, soft-agar and suspension growth assays, cellular migration, and cell invasion phenotypes will be assessed. Aim 3: Analyze caspase-7, its regulators, and PARP expression in human CRC tumors We will determine the expression of caspase-7 and key proteins in tumor and healthy colon samples from patients with CRC. These studies will help validate the mechanism of regulation and role of caspase-7 in CRC. Conclusion: The high expression level of caspase-7 in the intestines is puzzling. The close relationship between caspase-7 and inflammation set the stage for novel and interesting discovery. This research will provide a solid ground to investigate the role of caspase-7 in CRC, and potentially lead to new treatment or diagnostic tools. Fields of research: Mechanisms of activation, regulation and activity of proteolytic enzymes Roles of apoptotic caspases in inflammatory processes Biochemistry and protein engineering of proteolytic enzymes Ongoing studies: Apoptosis is a form of cell death used by multicellular organisms to eliminate unwanted cells during development, infection, or when a cell acquires cancerous traits. It is controlled by the activity of caspases, a family of cysteine peptidases with a strict specificity for aspartate amino acids. Cleavage of protein substrates by active caspases causes the demise of the cell. Because caspases are culprits in apoptosis, it is of paramount importance to understand how caspases are activated to better comprehend how the body fights viruses and cancer. There is two types of apoptotic caspases: the initiators and the executers. As their name indicates, the initiators initiate the apoptotic process because they are the first to be activated via one of the many signaling pathways found within cells. The initiators then activate the executioners which executer the apoptotic program. There is a fundamental difference in the way both group of caspases are activated. Our program aims at understanding the intricacies of the activation mechanisms with the ultimate goal to exploit it to our advantage in the treatment of diseases such as cancer. To this end, we employ tools such as protein engineering, recombinant proteins purification, enzymology, and protein biochemistry. Then, we transpose the acquired knowledge obtained in our in vitro work to cell-based assays to study how the modified proteins behave in a complete apoptotic system. Finally, we wish to redirect the activation of caspases by other pathways, such as the ones that are supporting tumorous cells, to counteract the increase resistance of these cells to apoptosis. Other caspases (caspase 1, 4, 5) play an essential role in immunity for the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inflammatory caspases are activated on molecular platforms called inflammasomes. These complexes integrate damage- and pathogen-associated molecular pattern (DAMP/PAMP), which includes bacterial toxins, foreign nucleic acids, bacterial components and some chemicals. A body of evidence now suggests that some apoptotic caspases and inflammatory caspases participate in pyroptosis, an inflammatory response by macrophages and dendritic cells to various intracellular pathogens including bacteria and viruses. Pyroptosis is required to restrict pathogen proliferation by presenting them for destruction to the immune system. This process is characterized by a controlled rupture of the plasma membrane and the release of inflammatory contents. Our interest in pyroptosis is new and came about the realization that caspase-7, our model caspase, was activated by caspase-1 during pyroptosis. We are thus interested in understanding the activation mechanism(s) and the role of caspase-7 in pyroptosis. The proposed project has not yet been initiated. It is expected that the trainee will work on aim 1, and aim 2 if time permits. The project will be the trainee's. The techniques that will be necessary to perform the research include mammalian cell culture, immunoblotting, RT-PCR, several apoptotic assays including TUNEL assays, flow cytometry, immunoflurescence, DNA fragmentation analyses. The trainee will be supervised by me or a research assistant, and graduate students from my group or collaborators' group. The trainee will have, as his internship progresses, to develop his own protocols and optimize experimental conditions. The trainee will discuss his/her results with other lab members and may participate in lab meeting and journal club. The trainee must be highly motivated, curious and hard working. Prior laboratory experience is not required, but it is expected that the trainee will quickly develop autonomy. Furthermore, the candidate must aim at developing critical thinking toward his own work and the scientific literature. The ability to read English is mandatory. 1 May, 2015 30 September, 2015 Université de Sherbrooke – Sherbrooke Québec Jean-Bernard Denault 0 0 null English Comparison of in vitro vs. in vivo formation of cis-platin DNA adducts Comparison of in vitro vs. in vivo formation of cis-platin DNA adducts INTRODUCTION: More than 50% of the compounds used in chemotherapy damage DNA. The most effective chemotherapeutic compounds induce DNA lesions that are slowly repaired, blocking DNA replication and cell cycle over a relatively long period of time after treatment. However cell cycle arrest induces events that promote DNA repair, making cells resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs. Among the most difficult DNA lesions to repair are DNA interstrand-crosslinks. Cis-platin induces multiple forms of DNA lesions: 1) intra-strand crosslinks (96%), 2) inter-strand crosslinks (1%), 3) mono adducts (~2%) and 4) DNA-protein crosslinks (1%). The type of lesion formed by cis-platin depends on the DNA sequence. However, the torsion of DNA within the cell nucleus could also influence the DNA damage induced by cis-platin. Since in eukaryotic cells the DNA is heavily folded in a structure called chromatin, we propose that chromatin influences the type of DNA lesions induced by cis-platin. HYPOTHESIS: In the cell, DNA undergoes periodical torsions within a structure called chromatin. We hypothesize that cis-platin induced DNA lesions in naked DNA in vitro are different than those induced in chromatin in vivo. GOAL: To compare the formation of cis-platin induced DNA lesions in vitro vs. in vivo. METHOD: The student will isolate genomic DNA from yeast cells. The DNA will be damaged in vitro using increasing amounts of cis-platin and then sheared to obtain a population of fragmented DNA having, on average, a length of ~1 kbp. Thereafter, the damaged DNA will be analyzed by HPLC to determine the type of DNA lesions. In parallel, yeast cells will be treated with cis-platin. The DNA will be isolated, sheared and analyzed by HPLC. The results will be compared and the percentage for each type of DNA lesion determined for both, in vitro and in vivo treatments. In the laboratory we have the know-how to treat yeast cells with DNA damaging agents (Toussaint M and Conconi A (2006). High-throughput and sensitive assay to measure yeast cell growth: a bench protocol for testing genotoxic agents. NATURE Prot 1, 1922-1928). Moreover, Dr Richard Wagner - Department of radiobiology, Faculty of medicine, University of Sherbrooke - is a DNA chemist that studies DNA lesions by HPLC (Cadet J, Douki T, Ravanat JL, Wagner JR (2012). Measurement of oxidatively generated base damage to nucleic acids in cells: Facts and artifacts. Bioanal. Rev. 4, 55-74). DNA damage, DNA repair and maintenance of the genome Environmental agents such as the ultraviolet (UV) component of sunlight, ionizing radiation, numerous genotoxic chemicals and pollutants cause DNA damage. If not repaired, DNA damage can lead to mutations and increased risk for cancer. For example, UV light induces two major types of damage: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts, both of which are associated with skin cancer. The genome is organized into nuclear sub-domains, which create microenvironments favoring distinct chromatin structures and functions (e.g., highly repetitive sequences, centromeres, telomeres, inactive genes, RNA polymerase-III, -II and -I transcribed genes). Correlations have been drawn between gene silencing and its proximity to a heterochromatic compartment. For instance, yeast telomeres are clustered at the nuclear periphery, are formed onto an altered chromatin structure that shares features with heterochromatin, and silences adjacent genes. At the other end of the scale are ribosomal genes, which are transcribed at a very high rate by RNA polymerase I (~60% of total transcription), have a loose chromatin structure and are clustered in the nucleolus. Thus, we propose that the kinetics of DNA repair vary among the nuclear sub-domains. To better understand the mechanisms of DNA repair and how cells maintain the integrity of the genome, we analyze DNA repair in different chromosomal contexts. There are 4 categories of DNA repair: Recombination-, Mismatch-, Base excision- and Nucleotide excision (NER)- repair. The repair pathways were conserved through evolution and are present from bacteria to human. In general, these repair pathways function independently since they are rather specialized for different groups of DNA lesions. However, under certain circumstances extensive cross-talk can occur between repair pathways. In the laboratory we study NER, which is performed by a large multi-enzymatic complex and removes numerous types of lesions from the DNA, including: bulky adducts caused by chemicals, inter- or intra-strand cross-links and UV photoproducts. NER in yeast presents most of the hallmarks of NER in human cells. The strength of the yeast system relies on both genetic and biochemical approaches, which combined make a powerful tool to study intricate processes such as DNA repair in chromatin. Currently, we study NER in RNA polymerase I, -II and -III transcribed genes (in their active and inactive chromatin states) and NER of the specialized chromatin structure at the chromosomes ends. On the other hand, nearly half of the drugs used in chemotherapy make DNA lesions (e.g., cis-platin). In fact, DNA damage induced by these compounds block DNA transcription and replication, thereby arresting cell proliferation. Therefore, a better understanding of DNA repair in living cells is of paramount importance to health science, and is the objective of the research ongoing in our laboratory. The student will lead the project. He/she will be trained and followed by one of the senior PhD student of my laboratory. The student will learn how to growth yeast cells and how to induce DNA lesions using cis-platin. In addition, the student will learn how to isolate DNA from yeast cells, how to shear it to the desired size and how to analyze its length by agarose gel electrophoresis. HPLC analyses are more complicated and the student will assist Dr Wagner during this task. A sound theoretical knowledge in biochemistry, cell biology and molecular biology is required. A basic training in laboratory techniques in the same fields would definitively be a plus. Most important, the student has to have a basic knowledge on how to work in contamination free and sterile conditions. 1 May, 2015 1 September, 2015 Université de Sherbrooke – Sherbrooke Québec Antonio CONCONI 0 0 null English An evaluation of 45 years of India-Canada research and educational partnerships: Building a strong base for future collaboration How to build robust India-Canada Research collaborations? Canada and India are connected by a history of cooperation in the education sector beginning with the founding of the Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute (SICI) in 1968 by the two respective governments. SICI’s key objective was to facilitate academic exchanges in the education sector. In the early 1980s, SICI began to promote Canadian studies in India, which culminated in 2004-05 with SICI becoming a truly bi-national organization with equal partnership between Canada and India. The Canadian Studies program was developed which generated a network of more than 25 Canadian Studies program at Indian universities. In 2010, Canada and India signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) in regards to cooperation in higher education. The most recent chapter between the two nations has been the increasing flow of Indian student immigration to Canadian educational institutions. Canada is the fourth largest destination of choice after U.S., U.K., and Australia for Indian students. Since 2011, there has been a 145% increase in the study permits approved for Indian students to be educated in Canada. The Canada-India educational sector is based on exploiting comparative needs and advantages. Canada is renowned for its secondary and higher education institutions, and in 2012, Time magazine named Canada the most educated country in the world. India on the other hand has a demographic dividend of abundance of youth but there is dearth of top-notch educational infrastructure, apart from the shining successes of IITs, IIMs, and AIIMS. Against this backdrop, many organizations have stepped in to offer the opportunities to connect with India and develop education and research capacities in a number of fields. However, it is important to evaluate the history of educational and research linkages between the two countries with a specific aim of identifying factors that allowed small baby steps of collaboration taken years earlier to lead to robust collaborations of today. From the rich database of SICI over past 45 years of supporting collaborative efforts between India and Canada, our team has identified several strong collaborations and the key Canadian and Indian principals involved in these collaborations. Our aim is to extensively interview these key players in Canada and trace with them the steps taken from initial contact to current status in order to identify the approaches that worked or failed to create vibrant research collaborations over the years. Evaluating many projects will permit us to synthesize and create a “best practices” model or models for effective and mutually beneficial research and educational engagement moving forward. The success of international research and knowledge transfer networks is increasingly vital to successful Canada-India relations, and evaluating the outcomes of some of SICI’s research partnerships can provide invaluable policy guidance going forward. The outcome of this project will be advisory guidelines or models for the organization to support and maximize the value of collaborative activities in the future; and the intern should be willing to seize these opportunities either in India or in Canada. This project is collaboration between two professors, one from the biomedical sciences and another from the social sciences, who have a long-term interest in Canada-India education/research links. Both are currently members of Canadian Management Committee of the Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute (SICI), and wish to jointly analyze the factors that contributed to robust India-Canada research partnerships that originated years earlier with a small but significant support from SICI over past 45 years. An understanding of this phenomenon will permit optimum usage of funds by granting agencies (private and public) to model programs that will foster more fruitful and robust collaborations between two countries. The principal applicant Girish Shah is a Professor in the Faculty of Medicine at Laval University and a senior researcher at the Hospital Research Center of Quebec (CHU-Q). His work focuses on fundamental biomedical research to understand how human cells that sustain genetic damage will make efforts to first repair their damaged DNA and survive; failing which they will opt for the last ditch but safe response of committing “hara-kiri” or suicide so as not to harm rest of the body. The applications of these concepts are relevant in the development of cancer or in cancer therapy. In addition, he has ongoing research collaborations with Indian Universities, which has led to many exchange students from India studying in his team from 3-6 months for research internships. His team also has students from different parts of the world, resulting in a stimulating work environment for research and education. The co-Applicant Dr Margaret Walton-Roberts is an associate professor in the Geography and Environmental studies at Wilfrid Laurier University Ontario, and the Balsillie School of International Affairs. Her research addresses gender, Indian migration, immigrant settlement in Canada, and the impact of transnational networks in both source and destination locales. In terms of transnational networks she has published a number of articles highlighting the role of immigration and remittances in transnational community formation and maintenance including work on health philanthropy, remittance-led village projects in Punjab, explorations of the role of the state and community in the nature of transnational relations between Non Resident Indians and sending communities. Recent work following up on the transnational network theme examines the links between immigration and trade between Canada and India, and international students and secondary education. She has organized India-Canada focused conferences, raised funds, directed projects, published outputs, mentored, collaborated internationally, engaged in knowledge transfer with policy makers and community organizations. She has maintained active supervision with students interested in South Asian immigrant settlement in Canada, global remittances, and the role of diaspora in development. The intern will work closely with both applicants and the staff at SICI offices in Canada and India. The intern will be based in principal applicant’s team at Laval University in Quebec City, the proposed site of summer 2015 annual meeting of SICI and the India-Canada Education Collaboration conference. The intern will attend these events in May, and have the opportunity to meet and conduct interviews with many of the key subjects of the project. Moreover, the intern should be willing to travel within Canada (depending on project funding) to meet the subjects of the research, work with the team co-applicant at Waterloo, and with the program officers of SICI in Calgary, where full data-bases of SICI are located. Specifically the intern will: 1. Collaborate with SICI staff in India and Canada to access data bases regarding past funded projects. 2. Assess the data and create a collective database including information on the recipients, the current location, the type of projects funded and the areas of study. 3. Evaluate the outcomes of such projects (where possible) in terms of publications, thesis, conference presentations and subsequent research projects and partnerships. 4. Interview a sample of SICI grant recipients (in person at the SICI conference in Laval in May), or over the phone or through email, to examine in more detail the long term educational and research capacity building effect of the project and its contribution to research networking. 5. Analyze the information (above) in order to understand the achievements and impacts of SICI’s small grants, and offer recommendations for greater capacity building going forward. 6. Submit a mid-term and a final report (end of the project) to the Institute, and where possible present the findings to members. This could include engagement with the India office after completion of the internship. We are looking for an intern with bright academic records coming from different disciplines, such as management, public policy, social sciences, education, journalism and related fields. The intern must have effective interview skills, which will require comprehensive English language skills, interpersonal skills and ability to work in a team. The intern’s research work involves the ability to analyze and synthesize ideas and concepts after reading literature and reports, for which he/she must have excellent skills for web based research and competence with computer softwares. Prior experience with interview-based studies and knowledge of some Indian languages can be a plus. 1 May, 2015 1 August, 2015 Université Laval – Québec City Québec Girish Shah 0 0 null English 'omics'-based platform and synthetic biology for the elucidation, characterization and production of plant natural products. Alkaloids constitute a diverse class of natural products and due to their potent biological activity, many are commercially exploited. Most alkaloids are derived from amino acids and characterized by a nitrogen atom in a heterocyclic ring. Recently, the alkaloids produced by Amaryllidaceae plants (e.g. Narcissus (daffodils) and Galanthus (snowdrop)) have been attracting increasing interest due to their multiple biological activities. For example, Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids (AAs) such as lycorine and narcissidine act as pesticides, haemanthamine and narciclasine possess anti-cancer properties whereas galanthamin is used to treat symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. The commercial development of AAs is restricted to limited availability due to low amount in planta (only galanthamine is produced commercially). Although there are obvious interests in engineering AA production, for crop improvement or development of pharmaceuticals, the lack of information on AA regulation and biosynthetic pathways make this task very challenging, no biosynthetic genes have been identified yet. An improved molecular understanding of AA biosynthesis will contribute to engineered plants with valuable AA profiles and pave the way for biotechnologies such as synthetic biology to improve production and availability. The overall aim of the proposed research is to increase knowledge on the metabolism and regulation of AAs in plants, with special reference to the establishment of ‘omic’ databases to facilitate discovery of novel genes involved in AA biosynthesis in Amaryllidaceae. Récemment, les alcaloïdes produits par les plantes médicinales de la famille des Amaryllidacées (e.g. Amaryllis, perce-neige, narcisses), ont attiré l’intérêt des compagnies à cause de leurs multiples activités pharmacologiques. Les propriétés des alcaloïdes des Amaryllidaceae (AAs) comprennent des effets analgésiques, anti-cancérigènes, anti-microbiens, cardiovasculaires et respiratoires. Par exemple, la narciclasine possède une puissante activité antimitotique, la crinamine est réputée pour ces propriétés psychoactives tandis que la galanthamine, un inhibiteur de l’acétylcholine estérase, est utilisée pour traiter les symptômes de la maladie d’Alzheimer. Les plantes produisent les AAs en très faible quantité ce qui limite leur disponibilité pour le développement commercial (seulement la galanthamine est produite commercialement). Malgré les intérêts évidents à manipuler la production d’AA pour améliorer les plantes productrices et pour le développement de nouveaux médicaments, le manque d’information sur les mécanismes de régulation et les voies de biosynthèse d’AAs rend la tâche très difficile. Récemment, l’utilisation de stratégie utilisant la biologie des systèmes et l’intégration de banques de donné ‘omiques’ (génomique, transcriptomique, protéomique et métabolomique), a facilité la découverte de gènes biosynthétiques impliqués dans les voies métaboliques des alcaloïdes. À ce jour, aucune ressource ‘omique’ a été développé pour les Amaryllidacées et conséquemment, plusieurs voies de biosynthèse d’AA sont encore hypothétique et les enzymes et métabolites intermédiaires les constituants attendent d’être découvert. L’objectif principal de ma recherche est d’augmenter les connaissances sur le métabolisme des AAs en utilisant une stratégie novatrice et moderne de génomique et de biologie des systèmes. Particulièrement en référence avec (1) la création de banques de donné ‘omiques’ pour faciliter la découverte de nouveaux gènes biosynthétiques des AAs et la génomique biochimique pour caractériser ces nouveaux gènes et (2) le développement d’une plateforme microalgale de biologie synthétique durable et verte pour valider la fonction des nouveaux gènes et pour la production d’AAs possédant des potentiels médicaux prometteurs. Une meilleure compréhension de la biosynthèse d’AAs est un prérequis nécessaire pour le développement de nouvelle variétés d’Amaryllidaceae contenant des profils de AA de valeur et va ouvrir la voie aux biotechnologies comme la biologie synthétique, pour créer des souches microalgales transgéniques pour la production d’AAs de valeur afin de diversifier l’agriculture et les industries pharmaceutiques canadiennes. Dans un esprit de sur la valorisation de la biomasse, la plateforme de biologie synthétique que je développe pourra être adaptée et utilisée en collaboration avec le nouveau laboratoire inter-ordre de biologie synthétique et de métagénomique dans une recherche plus appliquée. Lab work mostly in the field of molecular biology and biochemistry. Awaiting more information from the professor, so check back soon. Please do not contact Globalink Research Internships. Knowledge of molecular biology and biochemistry techniques. Lab experience. Knowledge of plant secondary metabolite and alkaloid a plus. 15 May, 2015 15 August, 2015 Université du Québec à Trois–Rivières – Trois–Rivières Québec Isabel Desgagné-Penix 0 0 null English Fan Blade Optimization for Incidence Tolerance and Low Loss The research project to be undertaken will focus on the robust design of fan blades for high incidence angle tolerance, subject to the requirement of low loss (entropy generation). The bypass fan of a turbofan engine is the blade row most subject to the distortions created in a boundary-layer-ingesting configuration. One possible path to minimizing the performance penalties associated with distortion is to ensure the fan blades are tolerant to a range of incidence angles. In this project, the design of 2D fan blade sections for high incidence tolerance will be investigated numerically and (possibly) verified experimentally using rapid prototyping (3D printing). The trade between fan efficiency and operating range will be explored and an optimization shall be conducted for a certain fan blade performance requirement (in particular, for a low fan-pressure-ratio design). Blade sections representative of conditions across the span (from hub to tip) will be investigated. While the literature contains work on incidence-tolerant blades in turbines [2] and the factors affecting incidence sensitivity in compressors [3-4] there is still much progress to be made on the design of distortion-tolerant fans. The low hub-to-tip radius ratios for fans compared to compressor and turbine blades is one aspect of the challenge, as very different blade Mach numbers are encountered between hub and tip. The challenges related to developing an incidence-tolerant blade differ between the hub, where the flow in the fan frame of reference is typically everywhere subsonic, and the tip, where the flow will often contain supersonic patches (transonic flow) and may even be supersonic everywhere. Due to the typical axial location of the fan on the spinner (nose cone), the hub radius changes significantly from the leading edge to the trailing edge of the blades. Therefore the 2D sections of fan blade considered will not be of constant radius, but rather will be taken on streamlines in the axial-radial (meridional) plane. To determine the radial displacements of the streamline patterns in the machine, a through-flow code will be used to estimate the streamline pattern for the no-distortion case. The blade-to-blade flow on 2D sections will then be run using the MISES package (written by Mark Drela of MIT, [5]). The sensitivity to incidence at each radial location will thus be assessed, and trade-offs between incidence tolerance and fan efficiency can be made for a given distortion pattern by performing similar analyses for various fan blade designs. At a high level, I conduct research related to the sustainability of air transportation and power generation. The focus here is on lower-order modeling of turbomachinery to develop solutions to the problem of operating turbomachines conditions away from design, whether that means ensuring stable operation at low flow coefficients or improving performance in the presence of inflow distortion. I also work on aero-acoustic (flow-generated noise) problems related to turbomachinery. Noise issues are often made worse by flow distortion so that these two research themes are related. The high-level goal of my work is to address challenges related to reducing fuel burn and noise from future generations of fixed-wing aircraft for commercial/civilian applications. One important technology identified [1] as offering potential fuel burn benefits is the use of boundary-layer-ingesting propulsion systems. In these systems, propulsive efficiency is increased by ingesting low-momentum fluid into the aircraft's engines. However, delivering such a flow to the engine results in inflow distortion (non-uniformity of the flow entering the engine) by necessity. If no special measures are taken to mitigate the inflow distortion, penalties to performance and operating range will occur for turbomachines such as the fan of a turbofan engine. To make such a propulsion system practical, many key research questions remain to be addressed, including: • what are the critical distortion characteristics in a given type of application, and how does machine performance scale with these characteristics? • what are best practices for simultaneous consideration of aircraft and propulsion system performance/efficiency? • what are the most effective distortion mitigation strategies in different applications? These may differ significantly for aircraft (where added weight penalizes performance -- efficiency of the entire vehicle must be considered) and power generation (where efficiency of the gas turbine is critical). As far as a turbomachine like the fan is concerned, inflow distortion results in some combination of three possible effects: 1. changes in local incidence angle (angle between the blades and the incoming flow in the blade frame of reference) 2. changes in local flow coefficient (local axial velocity divided by fan blade tip speed) 3. changes in local radial velocity in the blade passages. Major research tasks to be undertaken to enable practical designs involving significant boundary layer ingestion include: • the characterization and mitigation of performance penalties due to distortion in turbomachinery; • the enhancement of lower-order models of turbomachinery blade rows which can be used for preliminary design, to enable the accurate capture of inflow distortion effects; • the determination of robust blade row design parameters for high incidence angle tolerance while maintaining low loss. The selected candidate will use several software packages to analyze the flow in a low pressure ratio fan operating with distortion at several levels: • a through-flow code will be used to analyze fan operation in uniform flow (no distortion) and determine the streamline curvature in the axial-radial plane to set the blade sections to be analyzed in more detail • the blade-to-blade flow code MISES will be used to analyze the flow over the blade sections and to determine the changes in local fan efficiency resulting from incidence changes in a range representative of the distortions which may be found in boundary-layer-ingesting propulsion systems • various fan blade sections will be analyzed to determine the best fan blade design space for a given type of distortion Based on the software analysis results, guidelines for the design of distortion-tolerant fans will be developed by the selected candidate as a function of the characteristics of the inflow distortion. The candidate should have a strong background in fluid mechanics and thermodynamics, having studied the following topics: • internal flows / relationship between pressure gradients and streamline curvature • boundary layers • introductory compressible flow (meaning/impact of Mach number) • control volume form of the first law of thermodynamics • entropy and second law analysis Exposure to elementary turbomachinery concepts (Euler turbine equation, velocity triangles) is a major asset. The ability to learn new software is also key. Experience with the analysis of internal, compressible fluid flows at subsonic and transonic conditions is a plus. Comfort with reading academic papers is also welcome. 4 May, 2015 24 July, 2015 University of Windsor – Windsor Ontario Jeff Defoe 0 0 null English Nano-scale characterization of novel polymeric nanocomposites Novel polymeric nanocomposites will be characterized and systematically investigated to be designed and exploited as high-performance coating materials for oil/gas pipelines. A one-of-a-kind SPM will be used to elucidate the relationship between internal structure of polymeric nanocomposites and their favorable properties as pipeline coating materials. Ultrasonic subsurface imaging technique will be employed to identify nano-scale subsurface features (nanoparticles, nanofibers, nanoplatelets, etc.) buried deep inside of polymeric nanocomposite samples. In addition to the deep subsurface imaging technique, a high-resolution, non-contact IR spectroscopic imaging technique will be employed to characterize and investigate the surface properties of novel polymeric nanocomposites that show hydrophobicity (repelling water) as well as oleophobicity (repelling oil). Moreover, the nano thermal analysis capability of the SPM system will assist the characterization of localized transition temperature, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansion coefficients of novel polymeric nanocomposites. These thermal properties are very important parameters of polymeric nanocomposite coatings on metallic pipeline substrates. Environmental or operational temperature fluctuations of pipelines may induce delamination of the coating layer, due to the large mismatch between thermal expansion coefficients of polymeric nanocomposites and that of metallic pipeline. The presence of any delamination between the coating layer and the pipeline substrate may weaken the performance of the polymeric nanocomposite coating. Fortunately, these critical thermal properties of polymeric nanocomposites can be tuned by judicial choice of polymers and nanofillers. To enhance the performance of the coating materials, various compositions of nanomaterials and polymers can be mixed, fabricated, and characterized with the SPM with an ultimate aim of designing and manufacturing high-performance pipeline coating materials which reduce delamination and erosion/corrosion, ultimately preventing oil/gas leakage from the coated pipeline. Dr. Kim has extensive experience of scanning probe microscopes (SPMs) and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) over the last 10 years. He investigated micro/nano-scale fluid-structure interaction phenomena using a SPM and demonstrated a novel scanning thermal microscopy technique in liquid. He also characterized the surface elasticity and topography of polyelectrolyte hydrogels as a function of charge concentration using a SPM. Through systematic studies of the surface elasticity and charge concentration of copolymer polyelectrolyte hydrogels in cell culture medium, he demonstrated that endothelial cell attachment can be promoted even on very soft substrates which have high charge concentrations. Dr. Kim and his co-workers demonstrated photothermal cantilever deflection spectroscopy (PCDS), which combines the high thermomechanical sensitivity of a bimetallic microcantilever with the high selectivity of mid IR spectroscopy, is capable of obtaining molecular signatures of extremely small quantities of adsorbed molecules (tens of picogram level) without relying on chemoselective interfaces. Conventional infrared (IR) spectroscopy, which relies on Beer-Lambert’s law, is based on detecting small intensity changes in transmitted light through a sample using a cryogenically cooled IR detector. Increasing the incident IR power increases the inherent background signal without enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In contrast, in photothermal/photoacoustic IR spectroscopy with MEMS, the IR absorption induces changes in the sample temperature and these minute temperature changes are transduced by MEMS, which results in an enhanced SNR with increased incident IR power. By employing a broadly tunable, high power infrared source, Dr. Kim and his co-workers performed the proof-of-concept experiments and enhanced the limit of detection as well as the limit of recognition by an order of magnitude. Dr. Kim has developed a multi-modal characterization sensing system for nanogram amounts of polymeric materials. He demonstrated a multi-modal approach of simultaneous characterization of polymeric materials using a microcantilever sensor. He integrated nanomechanical thermal analysis with PCDS for monitoring multiple physical and chemical properties of samples in a single platform. The elastic and loss modulus of polymeric materials were determined as a function of temperature from the frequency response of the polymeric material-coated cantilever and the glass transition temperature, Tg, was identified from the analysis of the cantilever deflection signal. In addition, nanomechanical IR spectra from the same polymeric material-coated silicon microcantilever were acquired to provide chemical information on molecular structure. It is envisioned that this kind of system integration with multiple analytical techniques is very useful for the development of cost-effective analytical tools in the near future. First, the student should read the manuals and understand the working principle of SPM. Then he/she will get hands-on training on the operation of SPM and learn how to prepare samples. Various polymeric nanocomposite samples will be provided to the student and systematic characterization and statistical data analysis will be required. Previous hands-on experience on SPM and any micro/nano characterization tools (confocal microscopes, SEM, TEM) is highly desirable but not required. Physics or Mechanical Engineering or Chemical Engineering background is recommended. 1 May, 2015 31 August, 2015 University of Calgary – Calgary Alberta Seonghwan Kim 0 0 null English Development of a simulation platform for soft and deformable human tissues Introduction: Medical simulation is a rapidly growing field, having a positive impact on how healthcare providers are being trained and evaluated. Over the last ten years, there has been a 15-fold increase in the number of medical simulation centres (1400 worldwide today). Surgical simulation allows training outside the operating room (OR), thereby minimizing patient risk, facilitating adoption of new surgical techniques and assuring efficient OR use, for improved patient care. Current surgical simulators employ first-generation virtual reality (VR) technology involving the manipulation of simplistic anatomical structures with virtual surgical instruments. For surgical specialties requiring high precision and acute perception, such as ENT (ear-nose-throat) virtual simulation requires more realistic representation of both anatomical structures and surgical procedures with a diversity of surgical tools. In ENT, high precision and acute perception are necessary to avoid damage to cerebral tissues and vital structures thereby minimizing the risk of debilitating conditions and potentially fatal outcomes. VR simulation is widely recognized as a valuable tool for reducing adverse effects from surgery, by allowing for training and rehearsal outside the OR, without consequences for the patient. Project: In this project, we aim to develop the foundations of a physics-based VR surgical simulation engine focused on the task of soft and deformable tissues resection and removal. Physics-based simulation, such as finite elements, is especially important for high precision and acute perception surgeries such as ENT. The approach provides higher realism for visual and touch simulation of the physical situation, by relying on continuum mechanics fundamentals. The simulation is achieved through real-time resolution of the corresponding mathematical equations. In the project, we’ll need to develop software that comprises real-time finite element computation integrating tissue biomechanical models and anatomical models derived from patient images. In addition, the simulation software engine should be able to interactively accomplish tasks in surgical scenarios using a variety of surgical tools. Implementation of new surgical tools requires development of scenario data as well as software development in the core engine, both of which are specific to the surgical tool. The simulation software engine would use finite elements to calculate tool-tissue interactions, currently handling real-time simulation of an operating field of 3 mm resolution and 5,000 finite elements (brain tumour resection on a stand-alone computer). The engine should simulate tissue deformation, removal and bleeding and includes basic tissue manipulation and hyper-elastic tissue deformation models, derived from biomechanical data obtained on animal, human and virtual tissues. Professor Tan Pham specializes in mechanics of materials, in modeling and characterization of materials for materials forming, in fluid flow in porous media, in development of nonlinear finite element software and simulation-based optimization. His research aims also to multi-physics modeling, fluid-structure interaction and meshless methods. He has over ten years of experience in industrial research. He was working in different material forming processes such as extrusion blow molding, stretch blow molding, thermoforming, stamping of thermoplastics and fiber-reinforced materials; and in the modeling of fluid flow in resin transfer molding process. These processes involve different complex deformation mechanisms: nonlinear anisotropic behaviors and large deformation. These phenomena become much more difficult to solve when process is non isothermal. His works implied in both experimental and modeling aspects. He was developing a strong expertise in the modeling works using the Lagrangian description and the nonlinear finite element method for large deformation. Particularly, he is highly skilled in using C++ for object-oriented software development. He has contributed to develop two different finite element software. The first one is now commercialized by ESI Group under the name PAM - RTM, and now used by a dozen of worldwide academic users and more than 15 large companies (EADS, Dassault-Aviation, Ford, GM, BMW, etc.). The contribution of this work is as important as that this software is recognized as a leader in its field. The second one is Blowsim/Formsim software for simulating the forming of thermoplastics and reinforced thermoplastic composites. This software is unique to the Canada and used by more than 20 major Canadian companies (Amcor, Husky, Pactiv, Lear, etc.). Medical simulation is a rapidly growing field, having a positive impact on how healthcare providers are being trained and evaluated. Surgical simulation is in fact working with deformable human tissues. The modeling of deformable human tissues is very similar with the modeling of reinforced materials. It can be seen that the description of deformation of human tissues are governed by the same equation systems as for fiber-reinforced materials and the interaction of the blood and the human tissues are almost the same the interaction fluid structure in mechanics of materials. Moreover, the mechanical behaviors of human tissues are very similar to those of fiber-reinforced materials. For these reasons, Professor Pham is very interested and motivated in applying his knowledge and his expertise in the modeling of reinforced materials to surgical simulation in collaboration with OSSim, a new privately-owned Canadian corporation in the field of medical virtual-reality (VR) simulators. The expertise gained through his past research activities is an important asset of Professor Pham for this new development. The simulation engine comprises different packages for contact detection, deformation and graphics interface. Currently, there are some open-source platforms that allow simulation of soft and deformable tissues. The main role of the students is to (i) successfully compile these open-source codes with the in-house finite element code in C++, (ii) to develop a friendly user graphics interface for interaction tools and tissues and (iii) to transform the in-house finite element code to run on the “General-Purpose computation on Graphics Processing Units “ (GPGPU) platform (http://gpgpu.org/). It is planned to have two students. One is for the tasks (i) and (ii). Another one is for the task (iii). Of course, the students will work with the team at OSSim under supervision of Professor Pham at ETS. The student will develop code in C++ using Standard Templates Libraries (STL). He will work also with different packages for collision detection for deforming objects such as SELF-CCD, I-COLLIDE, etc. For the graphics programming, the student will work with some OpenGL-based packages such as CHAI3D. As we aim to run in real time the finite element simulation, we need to speed up the computation using the GPGPU. We have computers equipped with NVIDIA graphic cards which allow developing GPGPU code using CUDA scripts*. The second student will work on this subject. *(http://www.nvidia.ca/object/cuda_home_new.html). The student must have a strong background in advanced mathematics, in mechanical engineering particularly in mechanics of deformable solids, in multi-bodies contact algorithms, in programming using C++ particularly with Standard Template Libraries (STL), in graphics programming with OpenGL libraries. The student must be able to work with Microsoft Visual Studio as compiler and develop a simulation platform for soft and deformable human tissues from different open-source packages. A student in mechanical field, which has skill in programming, or a student from IT and software department, which has good knowledge in mechanics, would be perfect for this internship position. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 École de technologie supérieure – Montréal Québec Tan Pham 0 1 OSSim English Topology Optimization and Augmentation in a p-Cycle Restorable Network One of the most important contributors to a network’s availability and reliability will be its underlying topology, and so it is important to develop a solid understanding of how that topology can best be altered to allow network availability levels to reach levels required by the services and applications they’re expected to carry. Current topology-design approaches are only beginning to consider survivability, and none can yet fully account for multi-failure scenarios that might be typical of realistic networks. This will be a particular focus in this project in the proposed research program, with an emphasis on p-cycle mechanism to provide survivability. One key challenge, and the role of one of the two students I hope to employ through this proposal, will be to properly develop a mathematical model for p-cycle restoration that can be combined with topology optimization models. The approach here will be to employ linear programming (i.e., optimization modelling) to represent the p-cycle mechanism in a fashion that doesn't require explicit enumeration of p-cycles in advance. There have been several promising approaches published in the literature in recent years, but each has drawbacks that will make it unsuitable for our purposes (they all assume a specified and fixed underlying topology). The other challenge, and the role of the second student I hope to employ through this proposal, will be to adapt our current topology optimization linear programming models to permit temporary topology augmentation. The ability to augment a network’s topology through the use of temporarily leased bandwidth as a replacement of portions of a network that have suffered from failure may prove to be a very versatile, cost-effective option to provide enhanced availability for mission-critical applications. The initial goal of this phase of the research will be to provide a set of suggested ring closures or topology augmentations that will best improve availability and dual-failure restorability (using the p-cycle mechanism). Similarly, we also aim to provide a number of alternative scenarios that may allow for more cost effective solutions to achieving varying levels of dual-failure restorability on an application specific basis (i.e., some end-to-end paths or applications may have higher availability requirements, while lower levels might be sufficient for other less critical traffic). Perhaps the best use of such a method would be in augmentation design of existing networks, where we wish to find the best set of spans to add to it to meet availability requirements (rather than a complete network design from the ground up). This would be especially useful in the context of the very sparse topologies typical of public infrastructures used to support eHealth or first-responder networks. Even very rudimentary capabilities to suggest span additions that would best improve service availability would be a significant advance. And due to the significantly reduced complexity of this sub-problem (where a suitably diverse set of already existing spans and a much smaller number of eligible span additions could be considered), even larger networks could be accommodated. Despite considerable efforts taken to provide physical protection of cables, North American networks still experience frequent cable cuts and outages. Annual artes of 2 to 8 cuts per 1000 km of fibre are typical, which may not seem very frequent at face value. However, considering that even a regional network like the Alberta SuperNet consists of over 10 thousand kilometres of fibre, those rates imply cable cuts every 5 to 20 days. For more traditional networks of the type used for basic voice or data, outages can result in severe financial losses. Given the critical nature of many of the applications that emerging networks are intended to carry (medical-grade applications, first responder applications, etc.), the consequences of failure could be much more extreme. And yet the very sparse nature of many public (and even some private) networks' underlying infrastructure makes them inherently un-survivable, often with single points of failure. In those cases, span cuts could easily result in one portion of the network being severed from the remainder. My main area of research is oriented around the area of optimization, planning, design, and reliability analysis of the core transport network, and the design and performance analysis of networks in mission critical settings where single-failure survivability is strictly required, and where multi-failure survivability is desired. It is specifically focused on the development and analysis of restoration-related mechanisms that exhibit properties better suited to industry requirements, and new techniques for optimal design and analysis of network architectures that embody such restoration mechanisms. Implementation of design principles from this work will lead to more reliable communication systems that are less vulnerable to equipment failures or attacks, easier for operators to plan and manage, and more efficient and cost effective for service providers or public network infrastructures such as the Alberta SuperNet. The goal is to develop systems that are robust and reliable, can react almost organically by autonomously reconfiguring various resources and even its very architecture to accommodate unforeseen changes or events, and can integrate new resources into its operation as needed and available. This work requires failure modeling and analysis of the network, taking into consideration system reliability and availability, topology optimization, resource allocation, time-varying usage patterns, etc. While work has been done to provide enhanced survivability of critical applications, there are many opportunities to develop more advanced techniques to further enhance survivability and intrinsic availability. The growing prevalence of critical applications routed over modern networks will significantly alter the way in which they will need to evolve when compared to traditional "best effort" IP-based networks. The students will be primarily responsible for developing the mathematical models and carrying out optimization on standardized data sets, benchmarking, and analysis of resulting solutions. They will also likely interact quite closely with other students in the group, particularly an M.Sc. student and a Ph.D. student who are carrying out related work. The intent of the proposed projects is to better inform our existing research program and produce preliminary models that will be extended by graduate students to adapt them for solving more advanced problems and integrate specific network characteristics (e.g., MTBF and MTTR, availability metrics, etc.). The ideal student will have had some prior exposure to telecommunications networks and/or linear programming (i.e., optimization). Note that the term "linear programming" doesn't refer to computer programming at all, but rather, to systems modelling; the term actually predates computers by decades. That said, some basic programming skills would be an asset, as the students may need to produce simple code to prepare and/or analyze data. 4 May, 2015 28 August, 2015 University of Alberta – Edmonton Alberta John Doucette 0 0 null English Dual-Energy Imaging Optimization We are proposing to improve the accuracy of x-ray imaging (CXR), in order to provide better access to care and diagnostic accuracy, by optimizing an advanced X-ray imaging system capable of dual energy (DE) examinations. This new approach is set to improve discrimination of pleural and parenchymal details not visible in conventional CXR by highlighting differences between normal and abnormal tissues. Dual energy imaging uses high kVp and low kVp image captures of a patient that are obtained in rapid succession. A combination of the high and low kVp images leverages the differential X-ray absorption properties of bone and soft tissue materials, to produce a soft tissue-only image and a corresponding bone-only image. The absence of the rib structures in the soft tissue-only chest radiograph has the potential to increase the conspicuity of abnormalities. In the past, we have shown that dual energy technology improves the diagnostic quality in chest radiographs of lung cancer patients. However, the DR detector technology available at that time precluded the high and low kVp images from being acquired in rapid succession resulting in misregistration artifacts. This technology has since improved and is now capable of acquiring the high and low kVp images in less than 1 second. We plan to optimize the advanced X-ray imaging system though a series of phantom, cadaver and patient studies. Initially, we will perform a series of phantom and cadaver imaging experiments to characterize the imaging performance of the system and to assess the tradeoffs of dose vs. image quality for various acquisition and reconstruction protocols. A detailed review of the resultant images will determine the acquisition protocols that achieve the perceived preferred balance of image quality, total imaging time, and patient radiation dose. The outcome from this image review will be recommended techniques to be used for the pilot patient imaging study. The pilot patient imaging study will involve a cohort of 10 patients who will undergo a dual energy chest exam. Each dual energy image obtained in the pilot study will be evaluated for image quality and diagnostic potential by radiologists, who will make comparisons against the corresponding chest CT and projection chest X-ray image for that patient. Based on the results from the evaluation of the images obtained in the pilot study, refined techniques may be recommended for the full-scale patient study. Changes may be made to the system at this time to improve the imaging outcome. Finally, we will develop an experimental protocol for each of a series of patient imaging studies using the dual energy advanced application. The emphasis of these follow-up patient studies will be to demonstrate the clinical value of dual energy chest imaging, however, for only targeted indications and a smaller patient cohort. The clinical focus for the patient studies will be thoracic imaging. Optimization of low-dose radiation imaging techniques of the thorax is the main focus of my research. As an experienced cardiothoracic radiologist, I have seen first-hand how successful implementation of advanced computed tomography (CT) scanners throughout North American hospitals has resulted in an unprecedented explosion of patient irradiation and an increase in the radiation dose burden to the population. This raises concern for potential long term consequence of carcinogenesis. Research Goals: The goal of my research is to optimize thoracic imaging at a minimal radiation dose to the patient by adjusting image acquisition parameters and optimizing image post-processing. For example, one of the key areas of concern in thoracic radiology is the amount of radiation received by patients undergoing CT surveillance of lung nodules. We have investigated the potential for significant reduction in radiation dose for surveillance thoracic CT scans if the exposure parameters are customized to the nodule parameters available from the initial, diagnostic CT scan. We have concluded that the diagnostic utility of the lower-dose CT scans is maintained and therefore have adapted this strategy going forward. Current areas of research: Current research includes the following grant funded projects: 1. Low dose Lung CT perfusion 2. Low dose characterization of coronary artery plaque 3. Ultralow dose CT pulmonary angiography 4. Portable Dual Energy Chest Radiography Research Environment: There is a dedicated research environment in the Time Resolved Imaging and Image Optimization (TRIIO) Core laboratory, situated in the heart of the Medical Imaging Department at Toronto General Hospital. There are dedicated research computers, post processing workstations, on site CT and MRI physicists; PhD, MSc students and research fellows with access to a dedicated research 320MDCT and dedicated research Xray equipment. Most recently, our focus has been on optimizing an advanced portable X-ray (CXR) imaging system in collaboration with Carestream Health Inc. The target of this project is to develop an imaging system that has improved diagnostic utility in the compromised Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patient. Specifically, the new X-ray modality should be able to better distinguish between lung collapse, lung consolidation and pleural disease, as compared to conventional portable CXR. The system is of importance as ICU patients are generally unstable and therefore cannot always benefit from access to CT scanners. In addition, there are many countries in which extremely sick patients, who have abnormal chest radiographs, do not have access to CT imaging. Examinations performed on this new system will improve the discrimination between lung collapse, lung consolidation and pleural disease by using the material decomposition afforded by dual energy Xray (DE). The student will participate in the development and characterization of a prototype in-room x-ray chest imaging system capable of high-speed dual-energy imaging. He/she will assist by collating and processing image data and will make suggestions for improvement of image quality. We are looking for a student with a mix of technical and clinical experience in medical imaging. The ideal candidate has a background in Engineering or Physics and has a strong interest in medical imaging technologies. Basic programming skills are necessary; knowledge of MATLAB is preferred. Experience in image processing, image analysis, or neural networks would be a plus. 1 May, 2015 1 August, 2015 University of Toronto – Toronto Ontario Narinder Paul 0 1 Carestream Health Inc. English Modelling wings and rotors using an advanced potential flow method During the conceptual design phase, wings and rotors are often modeled using potential flow methods, which is computationally much more efficient than computational fluid dynamics. The proposed project is to explore wings and rotors using a higher-order potential flow method and develop optimized geometries. Of particular interest are wingtip devices that have beneficial impacts on induced drag. Examples of such wingtip devices are raked wingtips, winglets, and split wingtips. Although these devices are mainly associated with fixed wings, the proposed study will also explore their application to rotors and propellers. As part of the project, the existing higher-order potential flow code will have to be adapted for the problems at hand, before it can be applied. The subsequent simulation results will have to be compared with results from other sources for validation purposes. The model will become part of a lager performance prediction tool for the design and analysis of small unmanned aerial vehicles. My research interest is in applied aerodynamics and aircraft design. My long-term research goal is to improve the understanding of the aerodynamics and flight dynamics of small and mini aerial vehicles in order to advance their effectiveness. These robotic aircraft of only a few kilograms have many promising future applications, for example for meteorological research or disaster response. I am particularly interested in optimizing such flight vehicles for particular missions/applications considering aerodynamics, structures, and flight dynamics. For that purpose I have been developing theoretical and experimental tools that are helpful for the design and analysis of small and micro aerial vehicles. As part of my theoretical research, I am developing numerical tools for the performance prediction of small UAVs and MAVs. These numerical methods are computationally fast and compare well with experimental results of small and micro aerial vehicles, thus making it a suitable tool for design studies. One of the studies that recently led to a publication in the AIAA Journal of Aircraft deals with the determination of the “optimal” aspect ratio that either maximizes the lift-to-drag ratio or minimizes the power required of micro aerial vehicles. Especially in the low Reynolds-number regime of MAVs, the advantage of the larger span is often offset by an increasing profile-drag penalty. Another part of my theoretical research investigates the interaction between aerodynamics and structures of aircraft. A further focus of my fluid-structure interaction studies is the exploration of aeroelastically tailored wings that passively extract energy from atmospheric turbulence in order to reduce drag. The numerical method uses a combination of an advanced potential flow code and a time-dependent Euler-Bernoulli beam model that exhibits a high degree of numerical stability. Besides the study of passive energy harvesting, the method is also suitable for the investigation of the changing flight dynamics of aircraft with large wingspans that experience large deflections. The variations of the flight dynamics have proven to be a serious issue in the design and operation of high altitude, long endurance aircraft such as NASA’s Helios. The experimental part of my research deals with developing a better understanding of low Reynolds-number aerodynamics. Of particular interest is the improvement of the high-lift behavior of small and micro aerial vehicles. Improvements in the slow speed-flight range hold the potential to significant benefits for the overall performance for such flight vehicles. In general, their low flight-Reynolds numbers greatly handicap their high-lift capabilities and, thus, often limit their capabilities. My current work is the continuation of previous research of mine on high-lift devices such as Gurney flaps and lift enhancing effectors. The student will familiarize herself/himself with the approach of choice. This will include a review of the existing research and the determination of existing test cases for comparison purposes. This knowledge will be the basis for the student to adapt an existing program (written in C) to allow simulations of wings and rotors. He or she will use this modified program and use it to determine the impact of various planform modifications on the performance of wings and propellers/rotors. Depending on the progress, a simple wind-tunnel experiment will be used for validation purposes. The student will work as part of a larger research group that is involved with the modeling and testing of small unmanned aerial vehicles. The student has to have a good understanding of and interest in aircraft performance and applied aerodynamics. Furthermore, the student has to have good programming skills, preferably in the language C. The research will require a significant amount of modifications to a software package. Knowledge in propeller and rotorcraft aerodynamics are a further plus. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 Ryerson University – Toronto Ontario Goetz Bramesfeld 0 0 null English Supportive Robot Project The Collaborative Advanced Robotics and Intelligent Systems Laboratory is an undertaking by researchers at the University of British Columbia interested in Human-Robot interaction and intelligent robotics. Our research theme is the study and implementation of safe, comfortable, and useful interactions between people and robots. Led by Croft, the Collaborative, Human-focused, Assistive Robotics for Manufacturing (CHARM) project focuses on the emerging smart machine paradigm-shift for manufacturing systems, by advancing the use of intelligent robotic assistants (RAs) that can collaborate, directly and physically, with human co-workers in assembly tasks as part of the production team. We aim to advance methods for interacting with robotic assistants through developments in the perception, communication, control, and safe interaction technologies and techniques centered around supporting a worker performing a manufacturing task. Over the coming year we will integrate and user-test a number of new capabilities for our RA collaborating with a human worker various assembly scenarios. The key aspects of this work include intuitive turn-taking, handover of objects, and nonverbal communication between humans and robots. Human and workspace tracking is be provided through a multicamera RGB3D system. Contextual situation awareness information is provided by a database which maintains a world model of the worker, the environment, and the robot. A planning module works with the database to determine the next steps for the robot in response to the workers actions, and the task at hand, and an adaptive learning module adjust the timing for execution of the robot's plans. Currently, CARIS researchers are developing the RA interaction methods for these studies. For turn-taking, we have recently identified the implicit cues related to a worker’s gaze/arm/head movement (attention) related to task switching. We correlated these cues with the natural timing of turn-taking and are implementing an automatic turn-taking/giving controller. In a recent study on handover we have identified force cues which signal when the receiver is ready to take the object from the giver and designed a force based controller to guide the robot in this transaction. Similarly, in a nonverbal communication study, we have developed a communicative collision response mechanism a robot can use in human-robot interaction. Building on our findings in this domain, we are investigating the features of a robot and its motions essential to supporting human workers in collaborative activities. 1. Human-Robot Interaction. This research involves the development of robotic design and control strategies aimed at making human – robot interaction (HRI) safer and more intuitive. This research is necessary to enable robots to work productively and safely in human environments ranging from factory automation lines to healthcare facilities, office and laboratory worksites and individual homes. This work ranges from controllable stiffness design suitable for comfortable human interaction to safety-based control strategies, to the development of intuitive interfaces for natural interaction utilizing input from kinematic, kinetic, vision based and physiological based data sources and a new, highly cited, measurement tool to evaluate HRI. This work is aimed at allowing users to interact with robots in natural “interface free” manner. This work attracted the attention of GM Canada leading to the CHARM: Collaborative, Human-focused, Assistive Robotics for Manufacturing CRD (2011-2014)1. Previously, my lab demonstrated the first human-robot control system to respond to changes in affect within the control loop - this work has recently been leveraged in HCI applications , and to the development of a robotic platform for studying standing balance, where I contribute robotics, dynamics, modelling, and controls expertise. I have worked in haptics and teleoperation where modeling of interaction compliance is key for tasks such as medical robotics leading to novel methods for improving the kinesthetic realism and stability of haptic rendering of serial link devices. 2. Trajectory Planning and Jerk limited motion: Recent work has involved stiffness optimized trajectory planning motion for redundant, two armed robot machining systems. Building on previous work in on-line jerk-limited trajectory motion planning algorithms which have since been commercialized we have developed trajectory generation algorithms for 5-Axis highspeed surface sculpting. 3. Machine Vision and Visual Servoing for Industrial Robotics: Preliminary work, on vision assisted tele-training in which my students and I investigated practical machine vision based technology, industrial systems and robotic applications lead to a successful CRD with Braintech Canada Inc. on vision guided bin picking including partnerships with ABB (the world’s largest producer of industrial robots) and Toyota USA. This effort resulted in industrially appropriate dynamic collision avoidance, visibility computation, visual servoing and grasp planning methods. Following on from this project we have developed strategies for vision guided teach by demonstration for industrial manipulators which utilizes multiple demonstrations to generalize the task. Recently we have developed search strategies applied to “lost targets” in robot visual servoing applications The MITACS and graduate students will be working with several robot platforms in the CARIS lab, including two Barrett WAM 7 dof Robots with three fingered hands and 6-axis force sensors, and the Willow Garage PR2 Robot. Currently, this PR2 is the only such platform in Canada and one of a small number in the world. The student will be trained in programing in the ROS (Robot Operating System) environment created by Willow Garage, and learn techniques in robot task planning, controller design, and design for subject testing in human-robot interaction. They will be involved in evaluating and integrating the vision and force sensing modules for human tracking, developing interfaces between the sensing and control systems and the situation awareness database, and implementing and testing the interaction controllers on the robot hardware. They will help to develop and debug the experimental setup and user trials for the “Supportive Robot Project”. They will be involved in recruiting and preparing subjects, collecting and analyzing data, and preparing the documentation. Software knowledge: C/C++, Java Comfortable working in the Unix or Linux environment Mechatronics, Electrical, or Computer Engineering training Instrumentation and hardware/software integration skills Strong communication skills Outgoing and positive personality Self motivated and self starting Strong interest in the human aspects of robotics studies. 1 June, 2015 1 September, 2015 University of British Columbia – Vancouver British Columbia Elizabeth Croft 0 1 GM Canada Ltd. English Social determinants of health and social exclusion among aging immigrants in Canada This research project will examine social determinants of health and experiences of social exclusion within the aging immigrant population in Canada, including aging Chinese immigrants. The project will aim to: explore existing knowledge on social determinants of health and indicators of social exclusion of older immigrants in Canada; to identify specific social determinants of health and indicators of social exclusion of older immigrants in Canada; to examine lived experiences of health and social exclusion among older immigrants; and to identify relevant policy and practice implications. This topic is significant due to current Canadian immigration trends, with increasing immigration and diversity of immigrant populations, and the impacts of health and social exclusion on immigration experiences and on broader Canadian communities. This project will involve three primary approaches: a review of existing research, the collection of qualitative interview data, and the secondary analysis of quantitative national survey data. The study will begin with a review of existing research and literature exploring the social determinants of health and social exclusion in immigrant populations, with a focus on Canadian studies. The review and synthesis of this literature will inform approaches to collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative research data, including the identification of potential determinants and indicators. Both qualitative and quantitative data will be collected and analyzed in this study. Qualitative in-depth interviews will be conducted with older adults (aged 65 and older) from visible minority immigrant groups in Calgary, Alberta. The interviews will explore perceptions, experiences, and impacts of health and social exclusion. Existing relationships with cultural community organizations and immigrant service agencies will facilitate the recruitment of research participants. Secondary data analysis of quantitative national Statistics Canada survey data will be also conducted. Once the specific data set has been systematically selected, specific variables and indicators related to health and social exclusion will be identified and analyzed. The identification of these variables will be informed by the preliminary indicators and determinants identified during reviews of existing research. The findings emerging during the analysis of the qualitative and quantitative data analysis will be compared and contrasted, and examined in the context of existing literature, in order to more fully understand emerging patterns and variations. These findings will inform the development of relevant policy and practice recommendations, with the aim of more effectively and appropriately responding to the social determinants of health and influences of social exclusion affecting aging immigrants in Canadian communities. My current area of research concerns aging, culture, and health and mental health, and immigrants and immigration, including social determinants of health and related issues of social exclusion and social integration. Generally, my research interests concern the various cultural influences on healthy aging and social wellbeing in the community, among immigrant and ethno-cultural minority older adults in Canada and in China. My research in these areas has been supported by funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research, and other research institutes and funding sources. A number of my most recent research projects are directly relevant to the proposed project, and have focused on social integration of immigrant and culturally diverse older adults in Canada, the roles and challenges of immigrant and ethno-cultural organizations in the health system, social capital and economic integration of Chinese immigrants, and determinants of health of immigrants in smaller cities. My previous research has been disseminated through 84 peer-reviewed journal publications and 176 peer-reviewed conference presentations, as well as in other research reports and presentations. The majority of this previous research has focused on issues such as the health and mental health of immigrants, various predictors and correlates of health and mental health for immigrants and other older adults, culture and mental health, experiences of discrimination and exclusion in the community, and various barriers and influences on access to social and health care services among immigrants and ethno-cultural minorities (which also reflect aspects of integration and exclusion). My research has focused primarily on immigrant and ethno-cultural minority older adults and their caregivers, including Chinese, Taiwanese, and South Asian populations in Canada and diverse Chinese populations in China. I have also provided research supervision to numerous graduate and post-graduate students and post-doctoral scholars in the areas of health, wellbeing, and social integration or exclusion of immigrant and ethno-cultural minority populations, including older adults. My research background reflects a significant degree of knowledge and experience with respect to the proposed project, and will inform the development of the research approach as well as the training and supervision that will be provided to the student intern. In addition, as part of many of these research projects, as well as in other community development and advisory capacities, I have developed strong partnerships with cultural organizations in Canadian communities, which will be of benefit to the project as well as to the development of the student's community research capacities. Under my supervision, the focus of the internship will be on working with quantitative datasets as well as qualitative data collection. First, the student will receive training and on-going supervision in order to conduct interviews with older adults from Chinese immigrant communities in Calgary, which will enable them to gain significant experience in conducting qualitative community research. They will interact with Chinese community organizations and immigrant service agencies, during the process of recruiting research participants. They will then interact with aging Chinese immigrants, which will enable them to gain first-hand experience in understanding health experiences and experiences of social exclusion facing this diverse population. This will also allow them to further develop key research skills, including interview skills and building relationships with community research partners. If time permits, the student will also be involved in initial analysis of preliminary interview and questionnaire data. Second, the student will receive training and supervision to make use of a large national Statistics Canada data set. They will learn to conduct secondary analysis of quantitative data, in order to examine issues of determinants of health and social exclusion among older immigrant adults. Therefore, this internship will provide the student with diverse data collection and analysis experience, both qualitative and quantitative. They will have the opportunity to work with large sets of quantitative data, and to be involved in research processes directly with community members, which will contribute to a better understanding of the links between broad statistical data and lived experiences at the community level. A senior undergraduate student from China will be recruited for this internship. The student will have a high degree of English fluency, as the research project will be conducted in English plus the use of one’s Chinese language skills. The student will have an interest in experiences and influences shaping the health and wellbeing of older adults and immigrant populations, in China and internationally. Some experience with community work or research would be desirable, such as work or research with immigrant or visible minority populations, on issues of health and social exclusion, or with diverse community organizations. 1 June, 2015 1 June, 2015 University of Calgary – Calgary Alberta Daniel Lai 0 0 null English A G-CSF receptor decoy as a novel strategy to improve homing and hematopoietic reconstitution Scientific background: Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is a curative therapy for many hematological conditions such as the treatment of leukemia/lymphoma and various monogenic diseases. Efficacy of transplantation is highly dependent on the number of HSC available and their capacity to home back to the bone marrow (BM). Our comprehension of homing mechanisms comes mostly from the observation that injections of the granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), a cytokine playing an essential role in granulopoiesis, induces HSC mobilization from the BM to the peripheral blood [1,2]. G-CSF binds with high affinity to its receptor (G-CSFR), which dimerization induce mobilisation of HSC by reducing the expression of the stromal cell derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1a), a chemoattractant present in the marrow niche [1]. Binding of SDF-1a to its receptor (CXCR4) plays an important role in retaining/attracting HSC to the BM niche cells [3,4]. Conversely, binding of G-CSF also induces the synthesis of various proteases such as elastase, cathepsin, MMPs and dipepdidyl peptidase IV (also known as CD26) [1,5-7]. Importantly, increased expression of these proteases results in the degradation and inactivation of SDF-1a at the N-terminus and the degradation of other adhesion molecules. Hypothesis: Based on the efficacy of G-CSF as a mobilizing agent, we make the hypothesis that its transient inhibition will increase homing/reconstitution of hematopoietic cells. We propose to inhibit the action of G-CSF through the expression of a soluble G-CSF decoy receptor (solG-CSFR), which if expressed at sufficiently high a level, could sequester endogenous G-CSF. ________________________________________ Experimental supporting data: We recently observed that levels of G-CSF in bone marrow eluates of mice are augmented forty-eight hours after BM conditioning using IR [8]. As a proof of concept, we engineered a truncated version of the G-CSFR lacking 211 amino acids on the C-terminus corresponding to the transmembrane and intracellular domains [8]. The capacity of the solG-CSFR to sequester G-CSF was demonstrated by showing reduced ability of recombinant G-CSF to induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the presence of conditioned media (CM) containing the decoy receptor [8]. Using cultured BM stromal cells as a delivery vehicle to express the solG-CSFR in mice, we found we could increase homing by as much as 90% when compared to mice who received PBS. The results from these experiments suggest that transient inhibition of G-CSF could represent a novel therapeutic approach to be used alone or in combination with other homing strategies (ex. pretreatment with prostaglandin E2 or CD26 inhibitors). My laboratory is located in the Charles-Bruneau cancer center of the CHU Sainte-Justine, thus oriented towards translational research. I am currently supervising 4 graduate students (3 PhD and 1 Msc) and 2 research assistant/associate. My research program is centered on the biology and the role of cellular senescence on tissue regeneration and cancer, and its long-term impact on cancer survivors. I also have strong interests in the field of cellular therapy and its clinical applications. In particular in regenerative medicine using autologous stem cell transplantation as a therapy, and also as a vehicle for gene delivery. More particularly, the main two research areas in my lab are: A) The role of cellular senescence in tissue regeneration Stem cell expansion, maintenance, and differentiation must be tightly controlled to ensure tissue repair, regeneration and longevity. The microenvironment in which stem and progenitor cells reside plays a major role in their regenerative functions. One such example is the bone marrow microenvironment which regulates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) proliferation and differentiation. The formation of senescent cells may contribute to the deterioration of stem cell niche. Cellular senescence is a stable growth arrest induced by a variety of stimuli, including DNA damage, telomere dysfunction and oncogenes. Dysfunctional senescent cells accumulate in tissues in contrast to dying apoptotic cells. A key feature of the senescent phenotype is the secretion of biologically active molecules that can disrupt normal tissue microenvironments and affect the behaviour of neighbouring cells. Hence, our laboratory is studying how the accumulation of senescent cells (i.e following exposure to ionizing radiation) affects HSC engraftment and proliferation. We are investigating the possibility that the accumulation of senescent cells following drug treatments is responsible for late-affect of cancer survivors. We are also very much interested in studying how senescence affects differentiation of stem cells. B) Cellular therapy Using cord-blood samples, we isolate non-hematopoietic multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) that have the potential to differentiate into several cell types such as adipocytes, osteocytes, or chondrocytes. Injection of purified MSCs has the potential to improve the regeneration of tissues such as ischemic hind limb, infarcted hearts and injured skin. The objective of the laboratory is to increase bone marrow transplantation success rate and tissue repair using MSC based-therapies. Using technologies such as viral delivery and homologous recombination, we are looking to stably express therapeutic transgenes that would enhance the regenerative capabilities of MSCs. It is expected that a recombinant version of the solG-CSFR decoy will be available by the summer of 2015. The intern is thus expected to participate (alone or under the supervision of a trained research associate) to the following milestones: 1. Perform biochemichal studies to determine the ability of the recombinant solG-CSFR to prevent proteolytic cleavage of SDF-1a and the synthesis of various proteases. 2. Collect pharmacokinetic data, for example determine the half-life of the decoy in vivo. 3. Using human CD34 progenitor cells collected from cord blood, evaluate the ability of the recombinant solG-CSFR to increase homing and reconstitution in immune-deficient NOD/SCID/.c (NSG) mice. The student is expected to communicate well with myself and all personnel in the laboratory. It is also expected the applicant will have the theoretical knowledge in basic sciences such as biochemistry and cell biology. Ideally the applicant would already have experience in the lab and be familiar with technics such as Western blotting, ELISA, flow cytometry and microscopy. The ability to work with mice is also required. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 Université de Montréal – Montréal Québec Christian Beausejour 1 1 Bayer Healthcare English Workload Prediction in a Cloud Modern data centers employee thousands of servers, multi-petabyte storage systems and continue to grow. These data centers earn revenue by providing numerous computing services to users. Services are commonly deployed on virtual machines (VMs) across a cluster of computing devices, which can either be the property of the organization (i.e., "private clouds" such as Google) or rented to the public (i.e., Amazon EC2 and saleforece.com). To effectively run a data center, appropriate virtualization and cost-effective provisioning of the infrastructure, with respect to the type and size of the service requests (i.e., the workload), needs to be implemented. Over-estimating the necessary infrastructure for a set of requested services in a specified period leads to waste, under-utilization, and increased costs. However, under-estimation of the future workload is also unacceptable, since it degrades the quality of the service and may lead to violations of client Service-Level Agreements (SLAs). To ensure SLAs are met, while minimising infrastructure costs, datacenter operators need to know ahead of time the expected workload. Accurately predicting this workload is important for capacity planning, appropriate cloud provisioning, and cloud management, and can potentially result in significant cost reductions. Without good forecasts, cloud managers are forced to over-provision their pools of resources to achieve required availability, in order to attempt to honor service level agreements (SLAs), which they may still fail to do. This project is intended to help the operators, and managers of datacenter forecast short- and long-term workloads using performance data. The performance data are numerical measurements such as CPU utilization, disk consumption, memory consumption, network usage and transactional volume; these measures are collected from thousands of machine, and capture the runtime behavior of the data center over time. The performance data is recorded into performance logs that are usually in terabyte (TB) size, i.e., ‘Big Data.’ The aim of short term forecasting in the project is to provide accurate prediction of workloads in the near future, e.g., one or two hours ahead, usually based on week to a month of the datacenter’s recent performance history. The datacenter operators will use the short term forecasting for dynamic provisioning and placement of the machine in a data center, especially for load balancing to avoid performance bottlenecks. The short-term forecasting permits fine-tuning the provisioning to near-optimal assignments, which potentially results in getting maximum usage out of the in-hand infrastructure. Long term forecasting of workload is necessary for capacity planning and to ensure that the cloud infrastructure satisfies the clients’ requests. For the long-term forecasting, we will use at least six months to a year of recent performance history from one or more datacenters to predict expected workloads  three to six months ahead. Long term forecasting of workload is necessary for capacity planning and to ensure that the cloud infrastructure satisfies the clients’ requests. In a nutshell, the research project involves using machine learning (ML) approaches a) to mine performance data (i.e., big data) generated by data center to find important metrics, and b) use these metrics to build predictive models (i.e., short-term and long-term) to forecast workloads. I have two specialized research areas: 1) Workload modelling and forecasting in cloud computing and 2) Mining software repositories. Workload modeling and forecasting in cloud computing: Workload modelling consists of understanding the domain, identifying the key metrics to be mined, extracting patterns, correlating relevant sources of data, and defining the structures and processes that can best represent the workload. Once the data has been extracted, cleansed and properly modelled, the models can be validated by domain experts and populated by data from thousands of VMs. A simple classic workload model represents the values of the workload — such as “number of transactions per second”, “percentages of CPU utilization”, etc. — in time-series. However, this simple model can be augmented and improved depending on the domain, correlated metrics, and patterns of the data. The next step after workload modelling is predicting the future workload based on the historical workload. In most contexts, it is impossible to exactly predict the future workload based on previous workload and other correlated factors. However, the historical data do contain inherent structure, which can likely be exploited to make more accurate forecasts. Therefore, we focus on stochastic prediction techniques where statistical modelling is used to relate some semi-independent factors to a response (i.e., the future workload). A simple example of such predictions is applying a univariate prediction technique to forecast future values based on the history. A richer approach could correlate (using a multivariate prediction technique) not only the past values of the workload but also some other correlated metrics, e.g., performance metrics, to the future data. In nutshell, the main goal of my this specialised research area (i.e., workload modeling and forecasting in cloud) is investigating techniques for modelling and forecasting workloads in cloud environments to help optimize the infrastructure provisioning, placement and capacity planning. Mining software repositories: My other specialized research area is Mining Software Repositories (MSR). The field analyzes the rich data available in software repositories to uncover interesting and actionable information about software systems and projects. Software repositories such as source control systems, archived communications between project personnel, and defect tracking systems are used to help manage the progress of software projects. Software practitioners and researchers use the benefits of mining this information to support the maintenance of software systems, improve software design/reuse, and empirically validate novel ideas and techniques. You (the student) will be working on the real-world time series performance data (i.e., big data) from a multi-tenant cloud provider. You will be working in a team compromising of three senior researchers. They will assist you step-by-step to performing analytics on the ‘big data’ to identify patterns. For example, performing correlation analysis to find linear and non-linear relationship between performance metrics such as disk, CPU, and memory or to use clustering techniques or feature analysis to identify key performance metrics that are best representative of the workload. You will be using the environment of your choice such as R, SAS, Weka and Matlab to achieve the purpose. Next, you will use the key performance metrics and apply ML techniques to create prediction models. The team can help you in choosing at least two of the ML techniques for creating the prediction models OR— you can pick any two of your favourite ML technique. Last, you will compare the results of the two techniques. You will look into relative advantages and disadvantages of the techniques. For example, which technique is resilient to noise in performance data, which technique is useful for long or short term forecasting, what are their overheads in terms of reliability, accuracy, robustness and consistency. In addition, there is also an opportunity for you to get hands-on experience in using industry standard performance benchmark, such as Yahoo Cloud serving benchmark (YCB), Rice University Bidding System (RUBIS), TPC and Dell DVD Store. We use these benchmarks to perform load and stress experiments in the lab environment, i.e., our private cloud testbed. The performance data generated is used to test our prediction models. You will have chance to configure the load generators to simulate different workloads, work with cloud performance monitors and observe how the performance data is periodically collected from various machines across a cloud. The project is suitable for third or fourth year undergraduate student with keen interest in cloud computing, big data, software engineering, or machine learning. The student should have some experience with a scripting language such as Python or Pearl. Basic knowledge of machine learning techniques such as decision trees and regression is preferred. The student should have or be able to quickly acquire basic knowledge about machine learning environments such as R and Weka. Familiarity with virtualized environment would be an asset. Such a student must be a team player and possess the ability to take ownership of the tasks. 1 May, 2015 1 August, 2015 University of Waterloo – Waterloo Ontario Michael Godfrey 0 0 null English The Geography of News Project During the summer of 2015, I would like to replicate two of the intensive news-flow studies we conducted a decade ago on the Web sites of six daily newspapers, in order to assess whether any changes have occurred in the news maps these newspapers produce. Our initial studies -- in 2003 and 2004 -- were conducted at a relatively early stage of newspaper companies' digital platform development and we would expect to see in 2015 much less parochial news packages and greater distinction between the hard-copy and online versions of the newspapers. News-flow studies are quantitative content analyses which sketch patterns in the circulation of news items, document the extent to which some places and some topics predominate, and identify margins and exclusions in news coverage. Our previous experience with such studies resulted in a very sophisticated and thorough methodology. We downloaded every article from every section of the sites over a composite week and recorded: publication name; date; headline; source agency (e.g., Reuters); international filing origin (which country the story was filed from); national filing origin (which province/state/district the story was filed from, in the case of domestic stories); countries cited (in the body of the story); word count; number of accompanying illustrations; and topic. In 2003, we studied three self-described "national" newspapers in Canada (The Globe Mail, The National Post, Le Devoir) and in 2004 we studied three marquee U.S. dailies (The New York Times, Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times). While there were some notable distinctions in the way the six newspapers drew their news maps, there were consistent patterns as well. Specifically, these sites mapped out a highly circumscribed world (by geography and by topic) and thereby reinforced proximity – defined in the journalism literature as geographical, cultural and emotional closeness – as a principal, persistent and very subjective criterion of news value. Refereed articles based on these studies were published in Journalism Studies and the Canadian Journal of Communication, and I was invited by the editors of Aether: the Journal of Media Geography to edit a special volume of the journal dedicated to the geography of journalism (which was published in 2009). This work informs a book I am writing and intend to submit to UBC Press in 2015. The work would be supervised by myself and a PhD student in sociology who has been working with me for the past 12 years and was instrumental in the original research design. I am a former newspaper reporter and editor, and my specialized research area is the geography of news. In the context of globalization -- defined as intensified international flows of people, capital, communications and commodities -- and networked digital media forms which have produced what communications scholar James Carey has called a “new media ecology,” my work treats journalism as a form of cartography. Journalists, that is, through the representational practices of reporting and editing, create a world and situate news audiences within what Barrie Axford terms "identity spaces." The research contends that journalists, as story-tellers to their communities, produce a news geography which outlines the contours of community, asserts social membership criteria, identifies centres of institutional power and situates that community within the larger world. In so doing, journalists privilege a particular picture of who and where ‘we’ are, put particular events, people, institutions, concerns and solutions on the map, marginalizing and excluding others. By defining who and what are newsworthy, journalists create categories of inclusion and exclusion, relevant and irrelevant, and divisions between what John Hartley calls “We-doms” and “They-doms.” This pertains not only to what events, peoples and places make it onto the news map, but at the same time addresses questions of why and how: why the story is considered newsworthy to its target audience and how newspaper readers are connected to the people, places and events reported. I am interested in the on-line editions of daily newspapers for a number of reasons. Although the newspaper industry -- at least in North America -- is facing huge challenges in the transition to a digitalized mediasphere, research indicates that newspapers remain the principal source of original reporting. Their transition to a variety of digital platforms -- web sites, tablets, mobile apps, etc. -- has expanded their readership both in terms of numbers (according to a 2014 study by the World Association of Newspapers) and in terms of geographic reach; digitalization has freed newspapers from the boundaries of their traditional, physical circulation areas. Publishing distinct editions on the Web allows daily newspapers the possibility, at least, of re-drawing their news maps and seeking audiences beyond the bounds of their hard-copy circulation markets. Whether, and how, newspapers respond to this possibility provides clues about the structural forces governing news circulation, but also about how journalists imagine their community and address and situate their audiences in an increasingly mobile and interconnected world. After an initial training period, the students will be required to code newspaper articles according to a strict methodological protocol we have developed. They will be introduced to the project, introduced to content analysis as a methodology, and then trained to use our specific coding protocol. Coding involves reading the assigned news stories carefully and completing coding sheets which record: newspaper title, date, section, story source, topic, national and international filing origin, countries cited, word count and number of illustrations. We will conduct weekly review sessions to monitor the results of the students' coding and address any questions or problems that may arise in analyzing the stories. The coding will take place at the Concordia Centre for Broadcasting and Journalism Studies where the students will be equipped with their own computers and work stations, and where their supervisors -- myself and a PhD student -- will be accessible to them. I have supervised two dozen research assistants since 1999 -- undergraduate, MA and PhD students -- and it has been my practice to treat research assistants as junior collaborators. This means inviting any feedback they might provide on either the methodology or the project itself, and presenting them with the possibility of co-authorship on any conference papers or journal articles that may result from work on this project. As has been our practice with research assistants in the past, we will conduct an orientation session to introduce the students to the project and training sessions in which they will learn to code the newspaper articles according to our coding protocol. No previous experience with content analysis is required, although familiarity with news reporting would be an asset. The principal attribute we are looking for is conscientiousness, because content analysis requires precision and consistency. The students should also have a good grasp of written English (French-language comprehension would be an asset, but is not necessary). 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 Concordia University – Montréal Québec Mike Gasher 0 0 null English Tomosynthesis Chest Radiography We are proposing to improve the accuracy of x-ray imaging (CXR), in order to provide better access to care and diagnostic accuracy, by optimizing an advanced X-ray imaging system capable of performing limited angle digital tomosynthesis on standing and supine patients. This new approach is set to improve depiction of fine details not visible in conventional CXR by blurring out overlying structures. The limited angle digital tomosynthesis mode utilizes a series of relatively low dose projection images that are captured in rapid sequence over a limited angular range. Images are captured as the X-Ray tube is moved about the patient in one of several possible geometries. A typical exam will consist of approximately 60 low dose exposures captured over a 40 degree angular sweep. Because each projection is captured at much lower dose than a standard chest X-ray exam, the total dose to the patient from the 60 exposures will still only be approximately 2 to 5 times that of a standard 2-view chest exam, so substantially less patient dose than a CT. The series of projections are then reconstructed into volumetric slices using either an FDK or iterative reconstruction technique. The tomosynthesis reconstructed slices will generally have higher in-plane spatial resolution as compared with CT, however because the images are captured over a limited angular range, the reconstructed volume is highly anisotropic which precludes multi-planar reformatting. While tomosynthesis provides lower fidelity 3D information when compared with CT, the lower dose advantages of this approach may make it the optimal exam choice for dose sensitive scenarios where 3D imaging is indicated. We plan to optimize the advanced X-ray imaging system though a series of phantom, cadaver and patient studies. Initially, we will perform a series of phantom and cadaver imaging experiments to characterize the imaging performance of the system and to assess the tradeoffs of dose vs. image quality for various acquisition and reconstruction protocols. A detailed review of the resultant images will determine the acquisition protocols that achieve the perceived preferred balance of image quality, total imaging time, and patient radiation dose. The pilot patient imaging study will involve a cohort of 10 patients who will undergo a tomosynthesis chest exam. Each image obtained will be evaluated for image quality and diagnostic potential by radiologists, who will make comparisons against the corresponding chest CT and projection chest X-ray image for that patient. Based on the results from the evaluation of the images obtained in the pilot study, refined techniques may be recommended for the full-scale patient study. Changes may be made to the system at this time to improve the imaging outcome. Finally, we will develop an experimental protocol for each of a series of patient imaging studies using the limited angle digital tomosynthesis application. The emphasis of these follow-up patient studies will be to demonstrate the clinical value of tomosynthesis chest imaging, however, for only targeted indications and a smaller patient cohort. The clinical focus for the patient studies will be thoracic imaging. Optimization of low-dose radiation imaging techniques of the thorax is the main focus of my research. As an experienced cardiothoracic radiologist, I have seen first-hand how successful implementation of advanced computed tomography (CT) scanners throughout North American hospitals has resulted in an unprecedented explosion of patient irradiation and an increase in the radiation dose burden to the population. This raises concern for potential long term consequence of carcinogenesis. Research Goals: The goal of my research is to optimize thoracic imaging at a minimal radiation dose to the patient by adjusting image acquisition parameters and optimizing image post-processing. For example, one of the key areas of concern in thoracic radiology is the amount of radiation received by patients undergoing CT surveillance of lung nodules. We have investigated the potential for significant reduction in radiation dose for surveillance thoracic CT scans if the exposure parameters are customized to the nodule parameters available from the initial, diagnostic CT scan. We have concluded that the diagnostic utility of the lower-dose CT scans is maintained and therefore have adapted this strategy going forward. Current areas of research: Current research includes the following grant funded projects: 1. Low dose Lung CT perfusion 2. Low dose characterization of coronary artery plaque 3. Ultralow dose CT pulmonary angiography 4. Portable Dual Energy Chest Radiography Research Environment: There is a dedicated research environment in the Time Resolved Imaging and Image Optimization (TRIIO) Core laboratory, situated in the heart of the Medical Imaging Department at Toronto General Hospital. There are dedicated research computers, post processing workstations, on site CT and MRI physicists; PhD, MSc students and research fellows with access to a dedicated research 320MDCT and dedicated research Xray equipment. Most recently, our focus has been on optimizing an advanced X-ray (CXR) imaging system in collaboration with Carestream Health Inc. The target of this project is to develop an imaging system that has comparable accuracy to CT for the accurate detection of significant lymphadenopathy, lung nodules and lung consolidations. The system would provide an affordable alternative to CT scans for low-income countries. Examinations performed on this new system will improve the accuracy of conventional CXR by blurring out overlying structures (Digital Tomosynthesis; DT) or highlighting differences between normal and abnormal tissues (Dual Energy; DE). The student will participate in the development and characterization of a prototype in-room x-ray chest imaging system capable of tomosynthesis imaging. He/she will assist by collating and processing image data and by providing suggestions for improvement of image quality. We are looking for a student with a mix of technical and clinical experience in medical imaging. The ideal candidate has a background in Engineering or Physics and has a strong interest in medical imaging technologies. Basic programming skills are necessary; knowledge of MATLAB is preferred. Experience in image processing, image analysis, or neural networks would be a plus. 1 May, 2015 1 August, 2015 University of Toronto – Toronto Ontario Narinder Paul 0 1 Carestream Health Inc English Food-based Community development in the Boreal Region The Grow North program of Frontier School Division, based in Leaf Rapid, applies food-based education and youth training to build regional food security and capacity. Garden projects are widely used as a source of employment and training for at- risk youth to re-connect them with nature and thereby yield many individual and social benefits. Also, training youth on gardens builds local capacity and livelihood assets, which helps to counter the attraction of gangs, and a venue for rethinking their future” A program in rural Hawaii with indigenous youth resulted in a local food movement and a plan for a sustainable local food system. o analyze the potential for food-based development, feasibility and business plans will be undertaken for the fisheries, berry production, market gardens, youth employment programs, etc. at Leaf Rapids and South Indian Lake First Nation. Business plans will consider different options for financing, licensing and business models by working with the Canadian CEDnet. This research will leverage funding (e.g., Evergreen, Green Team, First Nation contaminants program, SSHRC Partnership Grant, Tides Canada etc.) to access resources and to create new partnerships. Capacity building will occur through new curriculum, videos, teacher and student workshops, youth internship programs, new media and community activities such as the organized harvesting and distribution of country foods and gardening. The nexus of community development (CD) and planning provides opportunities to build prosperity around food and other natural resources. Much of the research I engage in with communities including the Ithinto Mechisowin program and Grow North program are examples of a “participatory, bottom-up approach to development” (Markey, Pierce, Vodden Roseland, 2005, p. 2). These programs with an emphasis on culturally appropriate capacity building, youth employment opportunities and researching best practices to grow and harvest healthy, affordable food in Northern Manitoba. Food-based development and training is a purposeful intervention in the communities’ welfare. Douglas (1994: p. 10) describes CD as “communities addressing problems and opportunities, on their own behalf, which they perceive to be of importance to their quality of life or their community’s viability”. By matching local resources with local needs, community members can realize their higher-order non-economic needs, as well as meet the basic need to eat (Friesen, Melodie and Ian Hudson, 2005). Local food production provides self-sufficiency (Loxley, 1986) and a higher degree of sovereignty. To be based on indigenous values, according to LaDuke (2002), food-production must be decentralized, self-reliant and considerate of the carrying capacity of that ecosystem, akin to the mixed subsistence-based economy practiced in the past. High impact food programs are needed, such as country food programs, value- added fisheries and youth food-based employment programs. Country food programs are organized initiatives that support people living off the land in order to feed the local community (Thompson et al., 2011; 2012). According to the logit model, sharing country foods was found to be more important to food security than any of the five conventional food security pillars (OR 20.64, 95% CI 2.41–176.08, P0.01) (Thompson et al, 2012). The term “country food” refers to the fish, mammals, plants, berries, and waterfowl/ seabirds harvested from local stocks. Country foods program are associated with better food security (Thompson et al, 2012), however, the impact of OPCN’s program created in 2013, is unknown. The program provides food security by: 1) enhancing local sharing of country foods for elders, single mothers, other people in need and community events; 2) a local market-driven food economy; 3) creating food-based jobs for youth; 4) enhancing commercial fishery business prospects; and, 5) ensuring better access to local traditional food by harvesting, educating, sharing and managing natural resources. T. In interviews, focus groups and as part of the community food assessment process we will ask the following questions: What is needed in your community to build community food security? What changes do you hope to see in your communities from food-based initiatives (in short, mid and long term)? What skills and capacity does the community have in food production and food handling? What impacts accessing food from the land and water? What management and conservation programs are needed to sustain country foods? What does the community want in terms of sustainable livelihoods and education opportunities? What food programs have worked and not worked previously? Why? How is community development (CD) going to be sustained? What are the barriers? What programs do you have for youth CD? Are sufficient resources available? How do we obtain sufficient resources? What are the next steps? What is the level of training? What more training is required? What supports are available? Who could partner with you on this CD initiative? The student would have the skills/background or interest in: - Interest and skills in gardening, agriculture and seed saving (some training will also be provided) - Experience working with youth interns of diverse backgrounds - Interest in community economic development and capacity building of Aboriginal communities - Write monthly progress reports o - Good communication skills - Computer and internet skills. - Co-ordination and time management skills. - Video and recording skills to capture stories and create how to videos. - Reliable. - Able to complete tasks. - Able to work well with people. 1 May, 2015 1 October, 2015 University of Manitoba – Winnipeg Manitoba Shirley Thompson 0 1 Grow North Inc. English Computational and Statistical Algorithms for inferring Pathway Activation for Predicting Cancer Survival The goal of this project is to develop statistical and computational methods for inferring biological pathway activation for predictive modeling of disease risk and prognosis that combine genomic, proteomic and epidemiological contributions. Previous studies and our preliminary results have shown that single pathways usually have poor ability in predicting patients survival. It has been well-known that most complex diseases (e.g. cancers) are governed not just by single pathways, but complex interactions between multiple pathways. We will first identify signature pathways. A Bayesian approach will then be developed to measure the signature pathway activation for each cancer genomic and genetic profile. Finally, a lasso-based Cox proportional hazard regression model will be implemented to include combined activity status of two or more signature pathways. Our new algorithms will narrow the gap between clinical and experimental evidence to measure and relate activity patterns of multiple oncogenic pathways simultaneously in cancers. Dr. Pingzhao Hu is currently a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics of the University of Manitoba and Assistant Professor (Status) in Division of Biostatistics, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. Pingzhao received his PhD in computer science from York University. His educational background was mainly in applied statistics and machine learning. He has more than 10-year research experience in bioinformatics and statistical genetics in one of Canada leading genome centres (The Centre for Applied Genomics at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto). His primary research interests are related to computational biology, also referred to as bioinformatics. The majority of his research has focused on the development and application of computational and statistical techniques that utilize large amounts of data to study biomedical problems. This work is based on “omics” data generated from high-throughput experimental methodologies, such as gene expression and SNP microarrays, genomic sequencing, physical and genetic interaction mapping, and tandem mass spectrometry. While these experimental methods provide the keys to a greater understanding of molecular processes and specific gene functions, these data remain largely underutilized by both biologists and computational biologists. His work aims to bridge statistics/computer science and medical genetics by developing and applying rigorous statistical and computational methods combined with biologically meaningful algorithms that incorporate expert biological knowledge into a comprehensive analysis of the high-throughput data. He has provided bioinformatics support and collaboration with many national and international scientists. The multi-disciplinary collaborative projects he has been involved in exploit various “omics” data sets that probe gene expression microarray, copy number variation, genetic linkage and association, methylation status, miRNA expression, proteomic expression and target and whole genome sequencing. The work has resulted in many biologically significant results. These include discoveries of: a duplication causing metaphyseal dysplasia with maxillary hypoplasia, childhood brain tumor subtypes, a rare variant associated with inflammatory bowel disease, and an osteosarcoma tumor suppressor, etc. His research findings have been published in more than 60 peer-reviewed articles (such as Nature Reviews Cancer, Cell, Nature Genetics, Plos Biology, lancet oncology, Am J Hum Genet, Nucleic Acids Research). • Collect and organize public available genomic and genetic data sets • Implement computational and statistical algorithms proposed by the principal investigator in the project • Test the algorithms using the collected data sets and improve the algorithms • Document the algorithm details and analysis results • Senior undergraduate students in Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Computer Science, Statistics, Biostatistics or a related quantitative field • Basic programming skills using R, MATLAB, Perl or Python • Experience in handing large data sets 1 May, 2015 30 July, 2015 University of Manitoba – Winnipeg Manitoba Pingzhao Hu 0 0 null English Canadian Trans Youth Health Survey The Trans Youth Health Survey is a Canadian online survey which was designed to develop an understanding of transgender and gender variant youth’s physical health, emotional health, and health risk exposures. This survey also examined how (and if) various health outcomes for transgender and gender-nonconforming youth differ from their hetero-normative, gender-normative, and gay, lesbian and bisexual peers’ health outcomes through comparisons with population-based survey data where available. Another important survey question was how the home, community, and school environments contribute to health issues or wellness for transgender and gender variant youth. It consisted of two different surveys in both English and French (4 surveys total) designed to be developmentally appropriate for younger youth (age 14 to 18) and older youth (age 19-25). The surveys had similar content, and questions matched population-based surveys for the age groups and provincial regions for comparisons with general population groups. The survey was available from October 2013 to May 2014. The next stages of the project involve data analysis and interpretation, and reporting of the findings. SARAVYC is a team of researchers from across North America investigating the stigmas experienced by vulnerable youth – and the related health effects of their trauma. Our collaborative and cross-disciplinary work evaluates what strategies work best to improve the resilience and health outcomes for these youth, including runaway teens, Aboriginal youth and sexual minority adolescents. Our current work focuses primarily on understanding what creates a supportive school environment for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (LGBTQ) youth. Our multidisciplinary, North American team of researchers, with collaborators and knowledge-users from government, community and school districts, includes experts from British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, and Nova Scotia, as well as several regions of the U.S. The entire integrated program of research is guided by an intersectional, gender-sensitive approach to research questions and analyses, to better understand what works best for groups around gender, sexual orientation, culture and context. This program of research has a number of aims: 1.) Documenting the health inequities experienced by LGBTQ adolescents compared to heterosexual peers in population-based data sources, and where possible, identify assets or protective factors; 2.) Tracking trends in both the health problems, key risk factors (like bullying and other forms of violence), and protective factors, and determining how much changing trends in health issues among LGBTQ youth are explained by changing trends in risk and protective factors; 3.) Testing the long-term effects of homophobic bullying and other stressors on LGBTQ youth health and educational attainment in a national longitudinal survey in the U.S.; 4.) Conducting a national inventory of the different kinds of strategies schools and school districts use to reduce homophobia or increase school connectedness among LGBTQ youth and other groups; 5.) Linking school programs with school-based population data where possible, to identify which combinations of strategies are associated with lower rates of harassment, higher school connectedness, or reduced health problems for LGBTQ youth; 6.) Conducting community-based participatory evaluations of interventions and strategies to reduce homophobia, to understand how schools decide which strategies to choose, what outcomes they expect from the different interventions they are using, and whether these various school- and community-based strategies actually have the effects expected by those using them. The student will participate in the Trans Youth Health Survey project by assisting with statistical analyses, conducting literature reviews, and assisting with the preparation of written reports. The student will assist with analyses around various health topics in the Trans Youth Health Survey, including nutrition, physical exercise, sleep, mental health, sexual health, violence exposure, and school and family relationships. The student may also be asked to assist on other SARAVYC projects as required. University level education in a field such as Nursing, Public Health, Social Sciences, or equivalent. Knowledge of adolescent health and LGBTQ health research an asset. Previous experience in a research environment preferred. Knowledge of statistical methods and SPSS software required. Ability to communicate effectively, both verbally and in writing. Strong attention to detail required. Demonstrated ability to work with people from diverse backgrounds, including those from marginalized circumstances. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of British Columbia – Vancouver British Columbia Elizabeth Saewyc 0 0 null English Assessment of Meta-Biomarkers in Earlier Detection of Diseases The goal of this project is to develop an integrative analysis framework to pool and analyze omics data from heterogeneous biological studies to identify gene signatures at the level of a pathways and gene sets (here biomarkers can be a group of genes within a pathway or a gene set). It has been known that earlier detection of diseases (e.g., cancer) is a key for treatment. Traditionally, clinical information-based classifiers usually have low prediction accuracy and we expect that molecular classifiers will be a more promising approach to improve accuracy. Consequently, the identification of clinically significant, biologically and functionally relevant gene/protein biomarkers is critical. Previously we have developed integrative analysis frameworks for omics data at the level of single gene for human studies and cross-species analysis, and demonstrated that the gene signatures identified from the meta-analysis of omics datasets have better predictive power than those identified from an individual dataset. One of the major limitations in the frameworks developed is that the identified individual gene signatures sometimes have little biological meaning since they are from different biological pathways. Thus, the pathway/gene set integration perspective makes more sense biologically. This is because small changes in the function of multiple genes of a given pathway may not be detectable at the single gene level, but can add to create statistically large enough differences at the pathway level. This increases the power for identifying real biological differences. We will test our algorithms using public available omics datasets. Dr. Pingzhao Hu is currently a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics of the University of Manitoba and Assistant Professor (Status) in Division of Biostatistics, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. Pingzhao received his PhD in computer science from York University. His educational background was mainly in applied statistics and machine learning. He has more than 10-year research experience in bioinformatics and statistical genetics in one of Canada leading genome centres (The Centre for Applied Genomics at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto). His primary research interests are related to computational biology, also referred to as bioinformatics. The majority of his research has focused on the development and application of computational and statistical techniques that utilize large amounts of data to study biomedical problems. This work is based on “omics” data generated from high-throughput experimental methodologies, such as gene expression and SNP microarrays, genomic sequencing, physical and genetic interaction mapping, and tandem mass spectrometry. While these experimental methods provide the keys to a greater understanding of molecular processes and specific gene functions, these data remain largely underutilized by both biologists and computational biologists. His work aims to bridge statistics/computer science and medical genetics by developing and applying rigorous statistical and computational methods combined with biologically meaningful algorithms that incorporate expert biological knowledge into a comprehensive analysis of the high-throughput data. He has provided bioinformatics support and collaboration with many national and international scientists. The multi-disciplinary collaborative projects he has been involved in exploit various “omics” data sets that probe gene expression microarray, copy number variation, genetic linkage and association, methylation status, miRNA expression, proteomic expression and target and whole genome sequencing. The work has resulted in many biologically significant results. These include discoveries of: a duplication causing metaphyseal dysplasia with maxillary hypoplasia, childhood brain tumor subtypes, a rare variant associated with inflammatory bowel disease, and an osteosarcoma tumor suppressor, etc. His research findings have been published in more than 60 peer-reviewed articles (such as Nature Reviews Cancer, Cell, Nature Genetics, Plos Biology, lancet oncology, Am J Hum Genet, Nucleic Acids Research). • Collect and organize public available genomic and genetic data sets • Implement computational and statistical algorithms proposed by the principal investigator in the project • Test the algorithms using the collected data sets and improve the algorithms • Document the algorithm details and analysis results • Senior undergraduate students in Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Computer Science, Statistics, Biostatistics or a related quantitative field • Basic programming skills using R, MATLAB, Perl or Python • Experience in handing large data sets 1 May, 2015 30 July, 2015 University of Manitoba – Winnipeg Manitoba Pingzhao Hu 0 0 null English Gene expression variation in asthma PLEASE NOTE: RNA-SEQ PROFILES OF 96 ASTHMA SAMPLES WILL BE AVAILABLE Activity 1: Data analysis biomarker selection RNA-seq data quality control tools such as RNA-SeQC and FastQC will be used to provide measures of data quality, including yield, sequence read quality, alignment and duplication rates; also GC bias, 3'/5' bias and count of detectable transcripts. These tools will allow us to make informed decisions about sample inclusion in downstream analysis. TopHat and Cufflinks, free, open-source software tools for gene discovery and comprehensive expression analysis of high-throughput RNA-seq data, will be used for read mapping to transcripts, splice junction discovery, and transcript expression level quantification. The latest genome build UCSC hg19 (GRCh37) will be used as a reference genome, which was released in Feb 2009. De novo assembly of transcriptomes will allow discovery of novel transcripts, using assembly tools such as Trinity and ABySS. Differential gene and transcript expression analysis will be performed using Cuffdiff as part of the TopHat and Cufflinks pipeline, as well as an additional independent differential gene expression analysis tool, edgeR (http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/edgeR.html), which uses empirical Bayes estimation and exact tests based on the negative binomial distribution. For exon-level differential expression, tools such as DEXSeq will be used. ERCC will be used as spike-in control to assess platform dynamic range and lower limit of detection. After applying appropriate normalization and filtering to the expression data, the signal for each ERCC transcript will be plotted against its known molar concentration or amount, and linear regression used to determine the best-fit line. The dynamic range can be measured as the difference between the highest and lowest concentration of ERCC transcript detected in each sample. Detection sensitivity will be measured by the lowest molar amount of ERCC transcript detected in each sample, with threshold values for determining detection (http://tools.invitrogen.com/content/sfs/manuals/cms_086340.pdf). Once lists of differentially expressed mRNA transcripts are established that distinguish early versus late asthmatic responses, appropriate biomarker panels will be selected and cross-validated using a well-established computational pipeline. Specificity and sensitivity of the biomarker panels will be determined, and the area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC) will be computed using the ROCR package. Dr. Raymond Ng (Co-Applicant on this project and Chief Informatics Officer of PROOF Centre) will supervise the biomarker panel selection activities of the project. Activity 2: Additional bioinformatic analyses Differentially expressed gene lists will be further investigated using standard bioinformatic interrogation tools such as InnateDB, IPA and GeneGO. Complete blood cell counts and differentials will be used to implement regression-based analyses based on our own modifications to tools such as csSAM, to deconvolve the mRNA expression datasets to specific blood cell types. These analyses will increase our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying asthmatic responses. Individuals with allergic asthma respond differently, but reproducibly, to allergen exposure. The nature of this response has a profound influence on subsequent clinical course. Some individuals develop an isolated early response while others also go on to develop a late response (dual responders). The early phase of airway narrowing occurs within minutes of the exposure and is initiated by contraction of smooth muscle due to activation and mediator release from mast cells. In 50-60% of allergic asthmatic adults, the early response is followed by a more severe late phase response, starting between 3 and 4 hours after allergen exposure. In addition to airway narrowing, the late response is characterized by mucus hypersecretion, increased lung tissue permeability, and the infiltration and accumulation of white blood cells such as monocytes, neutrophils, and particularly eosinophils, leading to cellular inflammation of the airway and persistent airway hyperresponsiveness. 30-40% develop an isolated early response and do not have long term adverse consequences. In any given individual, the pattern of response is consistent. Despite tremendous interest, the molecular mechanisms which lead to the dual response and those leading to the isolated early response are not understood. Since it is the consequences of the late allergic response that are believed to contribute to chronic airway inflammation and uncontrolled disease it is important to identify molecular biomarkers that can predict this fundamentally different response. We are using high-performance transcriptomic profiling (RNA-seq) to investigate changes in peripheral blood cell gene expression that underpin the physiological and cellular characteristics of allergic responses to allergen challenge. Panels of specific gene expression signatures that are identified to be predictive of the late phase response will be evaluated as to their performance as biomarkers for this clinically-relevant allergic outcome. Discovering the molecular determinants for the variable responsiveness to allergen exposure will reveal new mechanisms, biomarkers and targets for the pathogenesis and treatment of allergic disease. Predictive and diagnostic molecular biomarkers of the early and late phase responses would serve as useful tools for implementation by the AllerGen Clinical Investigative Collaborative (CIC), both to refine screening procedures for subject inclusion into clinical trials and to assist with monitoring of therapeutic responses during clinical trials (pharmaco-genomics). The student's role will be to assist in the specific activities described in the Research Project above. He/she will work with a PhD candidate in the Tebbutt laboratory, and will also work with Dr. Raymond Ng (a colleague of Dr. Tebbutt at the PROOF Biomarker Centre of Excellence). The student will require advanced bioinformatics skills, including those described in the Research Project above. Additional background in genetics would be of use, since the student could also investigate sequence variation in the RNA data. 1 June, 2015 31 August, 2015 University of British Columbia – Vancouver British Columbia Scott Tebbutt 0 0 null English Electrochemical Production Of Graphene Catalysts For Electrochemical Energy Carbon-supported noble metal platinum (Pt), such as carbon black supports, Vulcan X and Ketjen Black, is generally used as the preferred catalyst in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs)1. Nevertheless, these electrodes present some major disadvantages such as inadequate resistance to corrosion caused by electrochemical oxidation and deterioration and/or loss of Pt2. Moreover, carbon is impermeable to gases and liquids and do not conduct the protons thereby limiting the catalyst performances3. Generally a protons conducting polymer such as the expensive Nafion is used to facilitate the transport4. Considering the cost and the operation instability of the electrode if current loadings are maintained in fuel cells, there is an urgent need to develop alternative supports to meet the specific problems of cheap and durable catalyst in fuel cell. This project has one objective; to reduce cost and increase durability of platinum catalyst fuel cell electrodes without compromising performance. To support this goal, we are focusing on developing highly stable electro-catalysts via the assembly of functionalised graphene nano-platelets (Gnp) with non Platinum Metal Group electrocatalyst as robust and durable catalytic electrodes. The ideal support catalyst to replace the instable carbon and costly Nafion should present some key features: robust, cheap, gas and liquid permeable, ionically and electrically conductive. Morphology/structure relationship between the support and the catalyst is of great importance because it can negatively affect the catalytic efficiency of the catalyst and in order to reach high performance, reactants and products should be able to circulate easily through the catalytic layer1. Graphene is of great interest because of its very high surface area, its high electrical conductivity and very good mechanical strength5. In this project we aim to synthesise Gnp as a corrosion-resistant catalyst supports as an alternative for conventional carbon supports. First task focuses on the preparation of the Gnp support. Mechanical or chemical exfoliation of graphite has been widely used to produce graphene materials however, these processes involve either too many tedious steps, use hazardous chemicals like hydrazine and somehow are incompletely leading to a loss of material conductivities and so on. Electrochemical exfoliation is regarded as a green, simple, economic, non-destructive, environmentally friend method that operates at ambient temperature and pressure. We have previously developed a new approach to exfoliate graphene with successive intercalation of surfactants to form functionalised Gnp in order to improve the H+ conductivity. Here we aim to electrochemically depose metallic materials with controlled size, shape and density by using a double pulse method. By varying electrochemical parameters such as electrode potential, time and current density, reaction temperature7 (increasing temperature increase the size) and/or by varying the ratio solvent/metal salt, control of the density as well as morphology and size of the metal will be investigated. The physic-chemical properties of the resulting metallic supported Gnp structure will be investigated. Electrochemical characterisation of the Gnp supported metal will be carried out by cyclic and linear voltammetry to determine the electrochemical surface area and intrinsic catalytic activity as well as accelerated instability measurements towards oxidation in acidic solution during 1 week at pH 1.0 cycling from 0V to 1.3V vs. RHE8. Dr. Barralet is a Materials Scientist expert in the processing of inorganics particularly through biologically and hence environmentally benign routes. One of his areas of research is in biomaterials and drug delivery necessitating avoidance of the use of toxic compounds and harsh processing conditions. This provides the drive for innovative processing routes to derive new properties from the limited library of materials permissible in the human body. He has published on the use of xerogels as protein storage matrices, nanoparticle synthesis and processing. Notable recent publications include: Ultrasonic Phosphate Bonding of Nanoparticles, Advanced Materials 2013, Serum protein controlled nanoparticle synthesis, Advanced Functional Materials, 2011 and Stabilisation of amorphous calcium carbonate with nanofibrillar biopolymers Advanced Functional Materials. 2012. He is adept at technology translation being the inventor of over ten patents, three licensed by McGill University. He sits on the Board of Directors of Canadian Society of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Board of Scientific Advisors of the Controlled Release Society. His innate ability to apply materials science innovation at the interface of living systems is one his major qualifications for his recent appointment as Vice Chair of Surgery (Research) at the McGill, the first non-clinician to fill this post during its 40 year history. He holds a visiting Professorship at the Institute for Biomedical Technology at the University of Twente Netherlands. His H-index is 33, he is the author of over 140 papers, and is regularly invited to give international keynote and laboratory guest lectures and reviews for Advanced Materials and Advanced Functional Materials. Dr Merle is a highly talented research assistant in the field of electrochemistry. Her prior experience was on the development of glucose/oxygen biofuel cells and her postdoctoral fellowship covered different fields related to alkaline fuel cell. In the PIs lab she codirects an Engage grant with Ballard on catalyst for PEMFC and runs projects on enzyme immobilisation in sonically welded microparticles, solar cell microstructure and is co-founder with the PI of a new company commercialising a high performance electrocatalyst. In the past two years she has 6 papers published, three under review 2 patents applied for and has papers in preparation on electrochemical exfoliation of graphene, Platinum Metal Group electrodeposition, enzyme immobilisation in silk and oxygen evolution catalysts. Our goal is to provide a guided supportive environment for self-motivated learning and where students are encouraged to take responsibility for acquiring their own knowledge. Students are encouraged to develop presentation skills through regular internal and external. Each student will have their own project for which they are responsible. The students will work on each objectives of the project, i.e. electroplating on exfoliated graphene system and physico-chemical characterization for PEMFC. The role of the research associate will be to oversee the day-to-day activities of the students especially in electrochemical deposition and characterisation, by guiding them trough the development and testing of these catalysts and coordinate dissemination of the findings. The applicant should have keen interest in multidisciplinary work and a strong drive to excel in a competitive international research environment. We are looking for a candidate with experimental background in chemical synthesis, energy conversion, inorganic chemistry, materials chemistry, and physical chemistry, preferentially with a strong background relating to experimental electrochemistry. A candidate with experience in electrocatalysis, electrochemical energy conversion, catalysis, chemical synthesis of graphene, synthesis of metallic nanostructures and advanced microscopies such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) will be preferred. We are seeking full-hearted candidates, hard working, and highly motivated commitment to research with independence and good communication in the English language. 1 January, 2015 1 January, 2015 McGill University – Montréal Québec JAKE BARRALET 0 0 null English Interpreting non-coding genetic variants in breast cancer Interpretation of non-coding sequence variants is a relatively unexplored area of genomics, but nonetheless there are strong indications that these variants contribute to disease and model organism phenotypes. We have implemented the Shannon human splicing software pipeline to quantify the effects of mutations in nucleic acid binding sites (splicing donor or acceptor sites) on a genome-wide scale (Mucaki et al. Hum Mutat. 32:735-42, 2011). The software locates probable mutations and annotates them based on genomic features. The pipeline is integrated with a commercial Java client/server. This project will significantly improve and add novel features to this software that broaden its applications for genomics research: 1) To customize mutation analysis for complete human genomic sequences – provided by the user – as a replacement for standard reference genome sequences. This requires registration of the standard reference against a custom assembled reference in order to map known genome annotations to custom reference features. This capability will be important for cancer genome analysis which involves comparison of variants present in a tumour against the reference genome sequence from normal DNA from the same individual. 2) To build infrastructure to automatically incorporate precomputed annotations and position weight matrices for mutation analysis of non-human genomes. There is a considerable demand for software to analyze non-coding mutations in other species, especially model organisms for human development and disease. We propose to release pipeline versions for these species. 3) To enable detection of mutations that affect other splicing and non-coding regulatory sequences. Information position weight matrices (PWM) are computed for each protein-nucleic acid interaction, which are each derived from alignments of functional binding sites. We will introduce PWMs to detect mutations in sites recognized by other regulatory proteins to the current pipeline. Initially, splicing regulatory protein binding sites will be incorporated in the pipeline analysis. Subsequently, a framework will be implemented for modeling and assessing mutations in other regulatory binding sites, such as those bound by transcription factors. 4) To link the pipeline to the next version of the established Automated Splice Site Analysis server (Nalla and Rogan, 2005). The upcoming version enables more detailed analysis of the predicted mRNA splicing isoforms resulting from individual mutations. Used in conjunction with the genome-wide analysis capabilities of the plugin, this functionality would provide insightful visualizations of the relative abundance of these mRNA species that would be valuable for prioritizing suspected mutations for laboratory validation. High throughput human genomic sequencing detects several hundred thousand variants per genome, challenging current bioinformatic methods to identify those which are clinically relevant. In contrast with mutations that alter amino acid coding sequences, the interpretation of non-coding variants in genome-scale sequence analysis is relatively unexplored. Nevertheless, this class of mutations is known to be a significant and common etiology in Mendelian diseases. Our Shannon human splicing pipeline will provide a predictive capability to detect and quantify mutation effects that alter mRNA splicing, thus filling an important niche in genome-scale mutation analysis. Knowledge of which variants affect mRNA splicing will guide and prioritize studies of the most likely pathogenic variants for laboratory investigation. Mutations affecting mRNA splicing can affect molecular phenotype, often resulting in multiple mRNA isoforms. Such mutations may reduce or abolish some isoforms and create or increase the abundance of others. Nucleotide substitutions in binding sites can be analyzed by comparing the individual information content (Ri in bits) of the natural and variant splice sites (Rogan et al. Hum Mutat. 12:153-71, 1998; US Pat. #5,867,402). Differences in individual information content (Ri) are related to changes in thermodynamic entropy (Shannon. Bell Systems Tech. J. 27:379-623), and correspond to changes in the strength of the complex between the binding site and the protein or complex that is bound (i.e. U1 or U2 splicesome). Ri determines the extent to which a site is weakened or strengthened by a mutation. Dr. Rogan’s laboratory has developed a novel approach which detects and interprets mRNA splicing mutations using binding site models (Nalla and Rogan, 2005). This algorithm is based solely on functional binding sites and not previously implemented heuristics which take into account both binding and non-binding sites. The average information Rsequence, of binding sites recognized by the same protein describes the conservation of these sequences. Sequences are ranked according to their Ri (Schneider. J. Theor. Biol. 189:427-441, 1997). Functional binding sites have Ri 0, corresponding to ∆G 0 kcal/mol. Strong binding sites have Ri Rsequence while weak sites have Ri Rsequence. Variations which alter the affinity of a protein to bind to the DNA sequence modify the Ri of the site. A 1 bit change in information content (∆Ri) corresponds to a ≥ 2 fold change in binding affinity (100/2∆Ri). The laboratory's current software implementation uses a Java front-end to a commercial bioinformatics development client-server environment to a back end Perl- and C++-based pipeline that analyzes sequences and annotates them. Student will contribute to development of software for genome-scale mutation analysis of splicing and transcription factor binding site mutations. S/he may write code and create applications for analysis of such mutations in non-human species. software development (Perl, Java), bioinformatics (preferred), genomics, sequence analysis 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 Western University – London Ontario Peter Rogan 0 1 Cytognomix Inc English Tuning Electrical Properties of a Nanocomposite Material The summer research project will investigate the dependence of electrical conductivity of a nanocomposite material on the morphology of the embedded microstructure. Thus, it will develop a platform for tuning the electrical properties of a material as desired. First, the project will investigate the theoretical realm of the problem. In this, computational simulations will be conducted to determine how nanoscale heterogeneities in electrical conductivity can influence the bulk electrical properties of a material. From this, scaling laws will emerge to guide the design of materials for electrical properties. Such laws will relate metrics describing microstructure morphology to bulk electrical properties. Subsequently, the aforementioned scaling laws will be tested experimentally. In order to do so, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) will be dispersed in a polymer solution. The material will be solution-cast in a magnetic field. The magnetic field leads to organization of the nanoparticles into microstructure of desired morphology (Ghosh et al., Soft Matter 9(6) 2013). Subsequently, the microstructures will be imaged in three dimensions using X-Ray computed tomography, to be performed using 3D microscopy and X-Ray computed tomography. Nanoscale features in the microstructure will be imaged using transmission electron microscopy of microtomed sections of such samples. While the imaging will be performed by a graduate student and a postdoctoral fellow in my laboratory, the intern will get valuable exposure to such the state-of-the-art in imaging techniques methods. The images will then be analyzed using MTALB scripts, to be developed in-house by the intern. Such scripts will generate metrics that describe microstructure morphology. Finally, nanoscale heterogeneities in conductivity of such samples will be measured using atomic force microscopy. The bulk electrical properties will be measured using a setup to be developed in house. Correlation of the two will help validate or iteratively fine-tune the scaling laws described in the first activity. Nature presents a vivid example of how form defines function; properties of any material are defined by its microstructure, often the organization of its constituent atoms. For instance, diamond, graphite and carbon black are made of identical carbon atoms, but differing crystal structures (or the lack thereof) lead to starkly different properties. On-demand control of microstructure promises capabilities that currently dwell in the realm of science fiction. However, while Mother Nature had the luxury to ‘make’ her own atoms, our means to control ‘atomic organization’ are limited by the rules of chemical bonding. Nanoparticles, however, play a promising role in achieving such ambitions. Being only several atoms in size, they can be used as building blocks of bulk materials. Thus, means to organize nanoparticles into microstructure of desired morphology promises to pave the way for synthesis of future materials whose properties can be controlled as desired and fine-tuned for a target application. In this effort, we leverage controlled organization of magnetic nanoparticles to influence the bulk properties of a material. The nanoparticles are assembled to form microstructure in a liquid prepolymer using an externally applied magnetic field. The polymer is subsequently cured to preserve the shape of the microstructure. Bulk properties of such materials depend on the microstructure morphology; and the morphology can be controlled at will by applying a magnetic field determined a priori. Thus, the method enables a comprehensive platform for tuning material properties. The long term goal is to build a ‘material printer’; beginning with the same polymer-MNP solution, an external magnetic field is used to vary the material properties, resulting in different manifestations of the final material. The aforementioned objective is thwarted by two fundamental gaps in current knowledge: (1) inter-particle interactions at small length scales, and the means to control them using an external impetus, e.g., an electromagnetic field, are not well-known, and (2) the dependence of bulk material properties, e.g., elastic modulus and electrical conductivity, on microstructure morphology is not well understood. The described research area is engaged in bridging these critical gaps, enabling path-breaking developments in the design of novel materials. It has tremendous application potential in 3D printing systems which are currently limited in printing objects made of materials that are supplied as stock. The student will work under close supervision and mentorship of myself and a postdoctoral fellow in my laboratory, Suvojit Ghosh. The student will play the following crucial roles in this activity: 1. Review of literature on tuning electrical conductivity by varying microstructure of composite materials and the associated theoretical models. 2. Use theoretical models from the literature to develop a simple computational model in MATLAB that describes bulk electrical properties of a material as a function of nanoscale heterogeneities. 3. Design and build an experimental setup for characterization of bulk electrical properties of a material using electrodes and a National Instruments DAQ system. This process would involve the development of LabVIEW codes to operate the DAQ system, provide electrical excitations to the sample and collect data. 4. Accompany graduate student and postdoctoral fellow in sophisticated material characterization experiments, e.g., X-Ray microCT, TEM imaging, AFM. 5. Write MATLAB scripts for image analysis, data analysis. This project is best suited for an undergraduate student in an Engineering Physics, Engineering Mechanics, Physics, Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science or a related program. The student should possess excellent analytical skills and scientific acumen. In addition, the student will work with postdocs and graduate student in a highly collaborative and fast-paced environment; thus, good interpersonal skills and communication abilities are desirable. The nature of this work spreads across multiple disciplines, but a strong background in the following areas are required: Mechanics (Statics, Dynamics, Fluid Mechanics) Mathematics (Undergraduate level Engineering Mathematics) Computer Programming (data analysis using FORTRAN, MATLAB) 10 May, 2015 20 August, 2015 McMaster University – Hamilton Ontario Ishwar Puri 0 0 null English Numerical modeling of novel building integrated phase change material with subcooling using iterative enthalpy method The project involves literature review of phase change materials (PCMs) in building applications, development of finite element PCM heat transfer model with subcooling feature using the developed Iterative Enthalpy method in Matlab, improvement of existing finite element model for the novel proprietary solid-to-solid phase change material (SSPCM) in esp-r for the comparison with the developed Matlab code. A script will be written to automate simulation for different cases to determine the optimal applications of PCM in net-zero energy solar buildings. Case studies will be carried out for sensitivity analysis. Please refer the following papers for more background information: Zhang, D., Fung, A.S., and Siddiqui, O., “Numerical Studies of Integrated Concrete with a Solid-Solid Phase Change Material”, 2nd Canadian Solar Buildings Conference, Calgary, AB, June 10-14 2007. Zhang, Dahai, Fung, Alan S., and Siddiqui, Omar, “Finite Element Modeling for Solid-Solid Phase Change Materials with Varying Phase Change Temperatures on Heating and Cooling Processes”, eSim 2008 Conference, Quebec City, QC, May 21-22, 2008. Almeida, Fabio, Zhang, Dahai, Fung, Alan S., and Leong, Wey H., “Investigation of Multilayered PCM Modeling in ESP-R”, 1st International High Performance Buildings Conference, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA, July 12-15, 2010. Sadasivam, Sridhar, Zhang, Dahai, Fung, Alan S., and Almeida, Fabio, "An Iterative Enthalpy Method to Overcome the Limitations in ESP-r’s PCM Solution Algorithm", ASHRAE 2011 Annual Conference, Montreal, QC, June 25-29, 2011. Sadasivam, S., Zhang, D., Fung, A. S., and Almeida, F., “Modeling Phase Change Materials with a Building Simulation Code Developed in MATLAB”, ASHRAE 2012 Annual Conference, San Antonio, Texas, June 23-27, 2012. Sadasivam, S., Zhang, D., Fung, A. S., and Almeida, F., “Modeling Phase Change Materials with a Building Simulation Code Developed in MATLAB”, ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 118, Iss. 2, October 2012, pp. 610-624. Almeida, Fabio, Zhang, Dahai, Fung, Alan S., and Leong, Wey, “Applicability of Multilayered Phase-Change-Material Modelling in Building Simulation”, ASHRAE Transactions, 2014, Accepted for publication in 2013. Fung has over 15 years of experience in energy research and oversees a vigorous research program on sustainable building integrated energy systems/net-zero energy buildings and fuel-cell based advanced power generation systems. He co/authored over 250 refereed journal/conference publications, book chapters, invention disclosure, technical reports and workshop presentations and trained more than 150 HQPs. He currently holds an NSERC Discovery Grant for research on net-zero energy buildings and a grant from NSERC Smart Net-zero Energy Buildings Research Network (SNEBRN). Total external research grants and contract funding from government agencies and industries received to date are in excess of $3 million. Fung was instrumental in forming the Ryerson-Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) partnership in RD on sustainable energy and community development in 2008. He is the project leader for various applied research projects including the TRCA-Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD) Archetype Sustainable House and related projects and the Comprehensive Integrated Post Occupancy Evaluation and Education Program for Affordable Multiple Unit Residential Buildings (MURBs) project which he initiated and became part of Toronto’s Tower Renewal initiatives aiming at greening aging high-rise residential buildings in the city. He is also involved in industry projects sponsored by local companies looking to explore and adopt sustainability in their service/product offerings. Fung is a principal investigator for the Ryerson Centre for Urban Energy (CUE). He has been appointed as the co-leader of one of the five themes -- Technology Transfer and Input to National Policy -- of the NSERC SNEBRN. He was also a key member of the SUI CMHC EQuilibrium Housing competition winning entry and Ryerson’s engineering faculty coordinator for Team North, the US DOE 2009 Solar Decathlon competition team, which was ranked 4th overall among 20 international finalists. Fung contributes to NRCan’s CETC Building Group University Network for the development of the building simulation software, Hot3000. He also collaborates on IEA’s Annex 42 High Resolution Simulation of Fuel Cell Cogeneration Systems in Buildings and IEA-SHC Task 40/IEA-ECBCS Annex 52 Net-zero Energy Buildings programs. He actively promotes Canadian sustainability research and technologies abroad by maintaining an international student exchange program. 31 students from 5 countries have participated since 2006. Research interests: Heat transfer modeling and numerical techniques. Courses: Basic undergraduate level heat transfer, numerical techniques in thermal engineering, finite element/difference method Software: Matlab Programming Languages: C/C++ The student will assist a PhD student to develop, validate, and implement the PCM subcooling codes for FDM/FEM heat transfer analysis of building integrated SSPCMs. The student is also responsible for the comprehensive simulation and analysis SSPCM potentials in net-zero energy solar buildings for both heating and cooling applications using the improved Mathlab code. 1 May, 2015 15 August, 2015 Ryerson University – Toronto Ontario Alan Fung 0 1 Potential partner: Dupont and/or Lafarge English Techno-economic assessment of energy storage systems for renewable energy Energy storage plays an important role in conserving available energy and improving its utilization as many energy sources are intermittent in nature. Various energy storage methods can be categorized as follows: - Chemical energy storage; hydrogen, biofuels and biomass, liquid nitrogen, and oxy-hydrogen - Electrochemical energy storage; battery and fuel cell - Electrical energy storage; capacitor and superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) - Thermal energy storage; hot water storage tank, storage heater, and steam accumulator - Mechanical energy storage; pumped hydro, compressed air and flywheel High temperature thermal energy storage (TES) has attracted increasing interest for solar applications. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) based on Latent Heat Storage systems (LHS) using Phase Change Materials (PCMs) is one of the most feasible solutions in achieving energy savings through waste heat recovery, especially when there is a mismatch between the supply and consumption of energy processes. Pumped hydro, compressed air energy storage (CAES) and battery energy storage (BES) systems are current economically viable technologies for large scale energy storage. Pumped hydro energy storage (PHES) systems require construction of dam facilities and reservoirs, which have relatively small energy requirements relative to the volume of energy stored. The CAES system also requires a relatively small amount of energy for construction, but its hybrid storage-generation nature requires considerable energy during operation. Batteries using vanadium or polysulphide electrolytes require substantially greater construction and OM energy inputs than CAES or PHES. The technical feasibility of energy storage technologies for wind and solar resources was analyzed earlier. Four energy storage technologies including superconducting magnetic energy storage systems (SMESs), flywheels (FWs), electrochemical super-capacitors (SCs) and redox flow batteries (RFBs), and their four combination cases were studied. Their results indicated that it is feasible for the hybrid energy storage system to be applied on a stand-alone renewable energy system. It was also shown that RFB is the most economical case, while a combination of FW and RFB is the optimal hybrid energy storage system. Despite several studies published on energy storage, lack of a detailed and thorough analysis of various energy storage systems is observed. The objective of current research is to develop a comprehensive techno-economic assessment of different energy storage systems which co-operate with renewable energy systems. The duration of storage, the energy density (stored energy per unit of volume), the specific energy (stored energy per unit of mass), and the installed capacity are the main characteristics of the system which should be considered when modelling and comparing energy storage systems. My research interests focuse on four key areas: integrated energy-environmental planning and forecasting, energy returns on investment (EROI) of energy conversion pathways, techno-economic assessment of energy conversion pathways, and resource assessment. The research will help in the development of a scientifically credible knowledge base to compare different energy sources, its conversion technologies, and environmental impacts. Integrated energy-environmental modeling area focuses on the development of integrated resource-planning models. These models would be used for projecting energy supply-demand mix, associated costs, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions over a long-term planning horizon for Canada. This will help in the formulation and assessment of policies for the provincial government and in making investment decisions for industry. It also focuses on the development of water and land footprints for a range of energy conversion pathways. Energy return on investment (EROI) of energy pathways area will assess energy pathways in terms of ratio of energy output to energy input. The goal is to determine how much fossil fuel energy is required over a life cycle to produce a unit of energy from a particular energy source. Each of the energy production pathways is analyzed as a combination of several unit operations. Material, equipment, and fuel-embodied energy and emissions factors are determined for each unit operation involved in a conversion pathway over its life cycle. The energy and emissions associated with each of the unit operations are investigated in detail. Techno-economic assessment of energy conversion pathways is aimed at developing data-intensive techno-economic models to determine the viability and economic competitiveness of energy production, conversion, and use pathways, and to determine the cost of producing energy from a particular energy source. These models will include characteristics of energy systems, such as efficiency, capacity factor, scale, yields, conversion rates, etc., that are specific to each unit operation involved in getting the end product from the primary resource and over the life the plant. Resource assessment area is focused on the development of energy resource assessment intensity maps for a range of renewable (e.g., biomass, wind, solar) and non-renewable energy sources for Alberta and Canada. The maps will include data-intensive geographical information system (GIS) maps. There is limited research in this area. Literature review and analysis. Techno-economic assessment. Feasibility study. Writing progress report. Heat transfer. Thermodynamics. Literature review. Writing. Self-motivation and organization. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of Alberta – Edmonton Alberta Amit Kumar 0 1 NSERC/Cenovus/Alberta Innovates Associate Industrial Research Chair Program in Energy and Environme English Combinatorics and Algorithms for Video-on-Demand The project involves constructing and evaluating mathematical algorithms for scheduling media content (TV shows, sports games, movies) in video-on-demand systems, typically on virtual machines in the cloud. Although the problem is stated as a real-world problem, it is, at heart, a mathematical one—an understanding of the real-world issues is easy enough to acquire if the student already is keen on and knowledgeable in mathematics. This is a project for a student who loves mathematics and is curious about how theoretical mathematics can actually create an impact in the real world. The specific project is to use combinatorics to construct new algorithms to allocate programmes to servers in the video-on-demand environment. Video-on-demand is an important new way of serving content to users, and provides programmes only when users request them. It thus offers users flexibility and freedom, but the downside is that it is more difficult for providers to anticipate and serve demand while keeping costs down. For example, we could satisfy all users by giving each user a server dedicated to her or him alone, but the cost would be prohibitive. The key to solving this is an efficient assignment of programmes to servers, but such an assignment is challenging in an environment where demand is constantly in flux as users come and go, and where users get impatient if their content is not served immediately. From a technical perspective, this is a bi-criteria optimization problem: we need to minimize cost to providers, but also minimize delay of users. This kind of scheduling is an old problem in mathematical optimization, and many techniques are already known for circumstances such as scheduling jobs on machines in a factory. Thus there are good starting points for approaching the problem. However, the video-on-demand situation creates new challenges with regard to speed, cost, availability, expectation, and variability. To deal with these challenges we need to take old algorithms and build on them, adding new constraints that reflect real engineering issues. Generally, the more realism we add, the more difficult the problem becomes. Can we assume all programmes take the same bandwidth, or that users all watch the programme for the same amount of time, or that users all start watching at the same time, or that users do not switch programs, or that users never later return to the original program, or that users have a large degree of patience? By moderating assumptions we can simplify or complicate the problem, thus the project has a lot of scope for continued development, and is an attractive combination of theory and practice. Combinatorics is the mathematics of discrete objects, and focuses on determining the best way to arrange a finite number of things. How is the word “best” defined? That depends on the area of application—it could be fastest, shortest, most numerous. The purpose of combinatorics is to arrange the data in such a way that patterns and relationships are clear. Stating a problem in combinatorics is often deceptively simple, while the solution can be maddeningly difficult, but when everything falls into place--or the researcher wrestles it into place--it can be one of the most magical areas of mathematics. One of my key domains of research is in applying combinatorics to new areas of computer science and engineering: combinatorics for algorithm design. I started academic life as a pure mathematician—the more esoteric the math, the better; however, I eventually discovered the excitement of applying my skills in a real-world area, and quickly found that I had in-demand skills as a mathematician that the computer scientists and engineers did not. Furthermore, applying these skills was straightforward, yet most of my fellow mathematicians were more interested in concentrating just on traditional pure math areas, leaving the lucrative area of applications to algorithm design to me. I currently employ combinatorics for use in problems in computer networking. Combinatorics has always been of service to networking, as the layout of a network is exactly the kind of arrangement of finite objects that combinatorics models. However, in the last 50 years combinatorics has proved useful in a much wider range of networking algorithm problems, such as scheduling jobs in the cloud, searching for targets in a network, and optimizing routing through the internet. Solving these problems falls under the umbrella of algorithm design. This design follows a typical process of considering existing algorithms for related problems, working through examples, taking feedback from the engineering or computer science partner, and finally constructing a new algorithm and proving its validity. Combinatorics guides the actual steps in the algorithm—how to partition or arrange the data, how to manipulate the individual data elements, and what approach guarantees we cover all the cases—but also enables the evaluation of the efficiency and effectiveness of the algorithm. Thus mathematical proof is a fundamental part of the process. It is mathematics disguised as a real-world problem. The role of the student will be to use mathematics to create new algorithms. The work will consist of adapting existing algorithms to new settings, by changing parameters, bounds, and input, and then proving that these new algorithms are correct and efficient. Existing proofs for related problems will be used as models. If time and inspiration permit, the student may create new and innovative algorithms that are more efficient, but most likely will build algorithms that follow the existing framework. It will be necessary for the student to read up on the background of the problem both in terms of the specific application and also in terms of algorithms to solve similar classical problems. The student will have regular, frequent discussions and brainstorming sessions with the professor to test ideas and suggest new directions. The student should understand linear algebra and have a first course in abstract algebra (groups, rings, fields). Some familiarity with combinatorics, algorithms, optimization, or computer programming is useful but not necessary. The project does not require any knowledge of the real world problems of networking, scheduling, or video-on-demand. More important than a knowledge of the application is a solid grounding in mathematics. Above all, the student should be curious, love to learn, be able to work both independently and with others, and enjoy constructing mathematical proofs and testing ideas. 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 Wilfrid Laurier University – Kitchener Ontario Angele Hamel 0 0 null French Effet anorexigène de l'activité physique: la contribution de la perception du goût L’activité physique ou, sous sa forme plus structurée, l’exercice influence pas seulement la dépense énergétique mais aussi la quantité et la composition de l’alimentation. Cette double action sur la balance énergétique favorise une réduction de la masse corporelle, ce qui la positionne comme un joueur important pour la prévention primaire et secondaire de l’obésité. Alors que les publications actuelles révèlent surtout quelle est la durée et l’intensité de l’exercice à privilégier, notre laboratoire vient de conclure une étude qui indique qu’il existe un moment spécifique pour bouger afin d’influencer l’ingestion calorique. En effet, bouger immédiatement avant un repas permettrait de réduire de 10% l’ingestion calorique comparativement à une période d’exercice effectuée beaucoup plusieurs heures avant un repas. Fait à noter, cette réduction est surtout attribuable à une réduction de l’ingestion des lipides. De plus, on ne note pas d’ingestion calorique plus importante aux autres repas qui suivent dans la journée. Ainsi, il s’agirait d’un phénomène non compensé et donc, qui pourrait possiblement s’avérer efficace pour le contrôle pondéral. Le projet réalisé par le stagiaire portera sur l’étude d’un mécanisme sous-jacent à la réduction de l’ingestion de lipides. Ce macronutriment, le plus riche en calorie par unité de masse et peu rassasiant, est influencé par la pratique d’exercice tout juste avant le repas. Ainsi, le projet vise à documenter le profil de réponse perceptive des principaux goûts : sucré, salé et gras. Des échelles de perception ainsi que des tests gustatifs seront utilisés lors des trois conditions expérimentales réalisées par chaque sujet et ce, sur différentes journées. Les trois journées seront les suivantes : 1) condition contrôle (sans exercice), 2) exercice plusieurs heures avant le repas et 3) exercice immédiatement avant le repas. L’exercice privilégié sera de type cardiovasculaire sur tapis roulant et d’intensité moyenne/élevée. Une première phase sera réalisée avec des individus de poids normal. La présence d’un deuxième stagiaire permettra d’ajouter des participants obèses afin de confirmer dans quelle mesure leur réponse est équivalente. Au final, la quantité de calories, la composition en protéines, lipides et glucides du repas et la réponse aux tests gustatifs permettront de dresser un portrait global de la réponse à l’effort. À ce jour, on connait bien peu la réponse à l’effort des goûts autres que le goût sucré. Ce dernier a en effet été plus testé dans le contexte des boissons d’effort. L’ajout des autres goûts et la connaissance de la réponse suite à différents positionnements de l’exercice dans l’horaire est sans aucune doute une avancée importante pour le milieu de la physiologie de l’exercice et du contrôle pondéral. Outre les avancées scientifiques, il s’agit d’un projet réalisé à l’Université de Montréal en partenariat avec l’hôpital pédiatrique francophone de la province, le CHU Sainte-Justine. Le stage permettra à(aux) l’(les) étudiant(s) de travailler avec l’équipe de Dr Mathieu au Laboratoire Activité Physique et Santé, de se familiariser avec toutes les étapes liées à la réalisation d’un projet et de plonger dans le monde de la physiologie de l’exercice et de l’obésité pédiatrique. La carrière de Professeur Mathieu est orientée sur l’utilisation de l’activité physique pour améliorer la santé de l’enfant. Professeur agrégée à l’Université de Montréal, elle s’est jointe au Centre de recherche du CHU Sainte-Justine à titre de première physiologiste de l’exercice. Le début de sa carrière a été consacré principalement mener des études sur l’étude des paramètres physiologiques impliqués dans l’obésité infantile: efficacité mécanique, oxydation des lipides, seuils d’activités à cibler, précision de la mesure par accélérométrie et perception de l’effort, du statut pondéral et des habitudes de vie. Son équipe compte aussi de riches collaborations avec plusieurs départements, diverses universités canadiennes et à l’international ainsi que dans des centres hospitaliers pédiatriques. Celles-ci sont venues bonifier ses travaux en traitant de la variation du volume plasmatique, du syndrome d’hyperphagie nocturne, des habitudes alimentaires et de la sensibilité à l’insuline. La productivité de l’équipe est grande avec, dans les cinq dernières années, 27 publications d’articles dont 7 menées par des étudiants du laboratoire, Le LAPS (Laboratoire Activité Physique et Santé). Les activités de recherche menées au LAPS combinent études transversales et d’intervention et ce, en laboratoire et en milieu naturel. Elles visent l’amélioration des interventions en prévention primaire et secondaire du surplus pondéral chez l’enfant via l’activité physique. Récemment, le programme de recherche de Pr Mathieu aborde l’effet anorexigène (coupe-faim) de l’activité physique comme nouvelle façon d’améliorer le contrôle pondéral et la santé. Il s’agit d’un domaine d’intérêt puisqu’en plus d’augmenter la dépense énergétique, une bonne utilisation de l’activité physique permet aussi de réduire l’ingestion calorique. S’appuyant sur ses travaux récents montrant entre autre qu’une utilisation stratégique de l’activité physique réduit de 10% l’ingestion calorique, des aspects comme la réponse à long-terme et l’influence de la perception du goût post-effort seront développés très prochainement. C’est dans cette optique que le stagiaire sera recruté. Avec la problématique importante de l’obésité pédiatrique au Canada et à l’échelle mondiale, il apparaît pertinent de s’investir au sein de l’équipe canadienne travaillant sur comment mieux utiliser l’activité physique pour assurer une meilleure santé aux enfants et aux adultes de demain. L’étudiant agira comme leader dans la réalisation du projet. Il sera impliqué dans les volets recrutement, évaluation et compilation de l’information. Les techniques seront précises seront mises au point avant son arrivée afin de pouvoir le former sur ses tâches spécifiques. Parmi celles-ci, il y aura les tâches liées au recrutement des participants à complété (celui-ci aura débuté en prévision du début du stage). Le stagiaire supervisera la réalisation des tests de goûts lors des séances de tests. Il encadrera aussi l’exécution de la portion exercice des séances. En cours de projets, les données seront entrées au fur et à mesure par les évaluateurs impliquées, incluant le stagiaire. Le stagiaire sera aussi sollicité lors de l’analyse et de la rédaction de rapport de recherche. À tout moment, la directrice du laboratoire (Pr Mathieu), un assistant de recherche du laboratoire et au moins un autre étudiant de l’Université de Montréal seront impliqués dans ce projet. Ainsi, le rôle spécifique de l’étudiant sera précisé dès le début du stage sur la base des exigences du projet, de son expérience et de ses aspirations futures. L’étudiant retenu doit être structuré dans ses actions et à l’écrit. Pour bien cheminer lors du projet, autonomie et grande curiosité sont nécessaire. Il doit pouvoir suivre un protocole établit et collaborer avec les membres de l’équipe. Une expérience dans le milieu du sport, de la santé et de la pédiatrie est un atout. Le projet nécessite l’usage de la technologie (appareils et ordinateurs) et l’encadrement des participants, donc des compétences techniques et humaines. 1 mai, 2015 1 août, 2015 Université de Montréal – Montréal Québec Marie-Eve Mathieu 0 0 null English Mechanism of Failure of Pipeline Steels in Sour Environment Safety of transportation of oil and gas provides a guarantee for sustainable energy supply. The fracture of linepipe may lead to environmental catastrophe and significant economic losses. Hydrogen induced cracking (HIC), sulphide stress cracking (SSC) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in various types of linepipe steels are phenomena that are responsible for the majority of linepipe failures. The information recently published by us and other researchers indicates that special textured steels can be resistant to both HIC and SCC. These findings create an emerging but completely unexplored opportunity to manufacture new generation of linepipe steels with highly improved resistance to two major type of pipeline failure. The proposed program will focus on designing new manufacturing processes for optimizing the texture and the grain-boundary structure of pipeline steel (X60 X65 and X65X70), based on a full understanding of the influence of thermo-mechanical processing on texture formation and the role of texture in steel performance in sour environment. This project will offer a novel approach towards the ultimate objective to enhance the steel performance by texture controlling of steel. In the proposed research we plan to cooperate with EVRAZ Inc and CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory to develop new processing technology for production of novel texture-modified linepipe steels, and finally transfer the related technology to Canadian manufacturing companies of linepipe steels. J.A. Szpunar joined the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Saskatchewan in August 2009, as Tier I Canada Research Chair. He came from McGill University where he was Professor of Materials Science and Birks Chair in Metallurgy. His research interests extend to various areas of materials related investigations. In particular he has longstanding interests in deformation and recrystallization processes in metals; in structure and properties of thin films; in electronic interconnects; in high temperature oxidation and corrosion; in synergy of wear, erosion and corrosion; in the applications of X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques to structure of grain boundaries and other interfaces; in hydrogen ingress into nuclear materials; in intergranular fractures; in fatigue and failure; and in superplasticity and other special properties of nanocrystalline materials. More recently his research has focused on environmentally friendly energy generation, in particular the extraction and purification of hydrogen, and research on materials used in Candu reactors and Generation IV nuclear reactors. This CRC proposal would create a Canadian Center of innovative research in selected areas of materials development and testing, along with novel techniques to support clean energy programs. The proposed CRC program will also include research on more safe and secure methods and materials for oil and gas transportation. Dr Szpunar has a strong record of research productivity. During his 22 years at McGill, 30 PhD students and 15 MEng students graduated under his supervision, and an additional 5 PhD projects are currently close to completion. At UofS he supervise a team of about 25 graduate students and researchers. He was a leader of 49 major research projects – mostly materials related investigations. The results of his research are presented in more than 700 research papers (400 in refereed journals papers and 300 in refereed proceedings and as non-refereed publications). Over the past six years he published on average 16.5/year journal publications and around 12/year publications in the proceedings. During his time at McGill he founded the “Textures Microstructure Laboratory”, that was recognized as a leading world center of microstructural research. Dr. Szpunar’s record of research contributions demonstrates his ability and readiness to undertake novel challenges in materials related research. the student will be analyzing the problem of failure of pipeline steels. He will be required to make observation SEM Orientation Imaging Microscopy of failed specimens and identify the microstructural characteristics where cracks nucleated and how cracks propagated. He will perform measurements by SEM, X-Ray diffraction, optical microscopy. He will also perform mechanical tests (hardness, stress strain) for the specimens that were not failed.. Testing mechanical properties Materials science X-ray diffraction Failure analysis Basic information on SEM techniques 1 May, 2015 1 January, 2015 University of Saskatchewan – Saskatoon Saskatchewan JERZY SZPUNAR 0 1 Evraz Inc. providing specimens English FEATHERS (Functional Engagement in Assisted Therapy through Exercise Robotics) The FEATHERS Project is creating and testing a motivating environment for younger persons with cerebral palsy to perform upper extremity exercises to regain function. http://caris.mech.ubc.ca/feathers/ FEATHERS uses manual controllers, like the Sony PS MOVE controller and the Microsoft Kinect motion capture system, to sense bimanual hand and arm movements to drive a computer cursor to control a video game embedded in social media. We are using specially designed devices based on the PS MOVE manual controllers to test with our participants. Our team has designed a 3D-printed enclosure that is better adapted to persons with upper extremity impairment than the original. The Robotics for Rehabilitation Exercise and Assessment in Collaborative Healthcare (RREACH) Laboratory is an undertaking by researchers at the University of British Columbia interested in robotic rehabilitation and medical technology. Ongoing research focuses on developing rehabilitation technology for hemiparetic users at home, using augmented feedback and commercially available motion tracking technology. Our lab is located in the Institute for Computing, Information and Cognitive Systems (ICICS) at the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, BC Canada. RREACH is an extension of the CARIS Lab. In the CARIS lab, we pursue world-class experimental research to advance the science of robots that interact with humans. Our research areas are human-robot interaction, robot vision, standing balance and therapy robotics. All this research is highly interdisciplinary, often intertwined with the fields of cognitive and social sciences, neurophysiology, physical therapy and others. Our researchers are a hard-working and social bunch. We regularly publish in top robotics conferences including IEEE International Conference on Robotics Automation and the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems, and in top biomedical journals/conferences such as the IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, the International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics and the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference. In the summer, our lab has its annual barbeque and retreat (past retreats include hiking to the Chief in Squamish and enjoying a waterpark), and our members often organize their own gatherings such as hiking, playing beach volleyball or enjoying Vancouver's diverse cuisines. The CARIS lab is a research group within the Mechanical Engineering Department of the University of British Columbia (UBC), one of Canada's leading research universities that is consistently ranked among the top 40 in the world. We are located in UBC's Vancouver campus, 30 minutes west of downtown Vancouver. As Canada's third most populous metropolitan area and the world's third most-livable city, Vancouver is a city that has it all. The city has amazing access to both urban and outdoor activities, an excellent local transportation system, and beautiful temperature weather absent of extreme heat or cold. More information about our lab can be found at http://caris.mech.ubc.ca. We are looking to a talented student to perform design changes to our software and hardware, based on the results from previous user testing. The candidate, working under the tight supervision of the principal investigator and a graduate student, will contribute to this work by designing, programming and testing a new gaming controller for persons who have become hemiparetic as a result of cerebral palsy. This work will combine ergonomics, a sensitivity about disability, electromechanical design and motion programming. In addition, the student will assist graduate students in testing our system with hemiparetic participants. The applicant will generally have a background in biomedical engineering. Required Expertise: - Interested in the design of human-computer interfaces - Experienced with Solidworks - Knowledgeable about 3-D printing - Able to assemble electronic devices - Proficient at soldering - Has excellent documentations skills - Able to work effectively in a multidisciplinary team-based setting Assets: - Ability to code in C++ or C# - Interested in assisting with human subjects testing with persons with physical disabilities - Has excellent verbal communication skills - Knowledgeable in LabVIEW use 1 May, 2015 1 August, 2015 University of British Columbia – Vancouver British Columbia Mike Van der Loos 0 0 null English New Models in Online Science Journalism A sense of urgency has emerged in the last decade about the future of science journalism. While it is often argued as an important source of information for non-specialists, science journalism has been heavily criticized as unable to connect with citizens in ways that allow meaningful engagement with science. This critique has intensified as diverse informational environments have appeared online and contentious scientific issues (e.g GMOs, stem cells, climate change, biofuels) have moved towards the misuse of scientific evidence. The objective of this research project is to build new ways of thinking about online science journalism that present improved solutions to the challenges facing science journalists online. In the words of Stuart Allen, the goal is for this project is “to identify productive ways forward in rethinking science journalism’s changing forms, practices and epistemologies within these diverse informational environments” [Journalism 12(7): 771]. It is here that this project seeks to make an impact by exploring how the emergent ecology of online science journalism (e.g. blogs, podcasts, Skype, Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter) can be balanced with various hard-won, old-fashioned virtues of science journalism [Science 324: 1491]. Methodologically, the project will seek to adapt models of print science journalism – rough “portraits” of various ways to construct science journalism from within differing normative frameworks [Journalism Practice 7(1): 62-80] – to the creation of online journalism. This will involve systematic literature reviews, qualitative interviews with online science journalists and the creation of test science journalism. This research could not be timelier, for Canadian science journalists currently work with limited and underdeveloped strategies for coping with a rapidly evolving online environment and the communication of contentious scientific issues. My specialization is science journalism and methods of public engagement with scientific issues. My research team (see: www.csjp.ca) works on a collection of projects and collaborations involving four main interests: 1. Research on science journalism in Canada that focuses on advancing the practical tools available to science journalists for writing on increasingly complex scientific topics; 2. The collection of the lived experiences of journalists, scientists and scholars on the creation of science journalism in Canada; 3. The support of critical discussion on current practices in the field of science journalism in Canada; 4. The support of student training in field of Canadian science journalism. My approach to these interests is interdisciplinary. It draws on efforts to bridge theoretical aspects of a rich history of study into science communication with a practical focus on science journalism and the constraints that shape it. The long term goal of my projects are to undertake research and training on how to implement improved, standardized practices in field of science journalism. This includes the open debate of how such practices would be an improvement, why such practices would be an improvement, and for whom such practices would be an improvement. I do not foresee easy answers, but feel there is much to study and discuss. We also study a variety of other issues related to public engagement and science communication. Some recent publications include: 1. Amend, E., Capurro, G., Secko, D. M. (2014). “Grasping Scientific News: The use of science journalism models to clarify the impacts of alternative forms of production,” Journalism Practice, in press. (Online first) 2. Secko, D. M., Amend, E., Friday, T. (2013). “Four Models of Science Journalism: A Synthesis and Practical Assessment,” Journalism Practice, 7(1): 62-80. 3. Bourassa, E., Amend, E., Secko, D. M. (2013). “A thematic review and synthesis of best practices in environment journalism,” Journal of Professional Communication, 3(1), Article 6. Available at: http://digitalcommons.mcmaster.ca/jpc/vol3/iss1/6 4. Secko, D. M. (2012). “One Topic, Two Stories: Insights from Experimental Journalism on a Fish’s DNA,” Cahiers du journalisme, No.24: 50-71. 5. Amend, E., Secko, D. M. (2012). “In the face of critique: A qualitative meta-synthesis of the experiences of journalists covering health and science,” Science Communication, 34(2): 241-282. As possible, the student will be included in all aspects of the project. This will include method design, data collection and analysis, and publication of the results. Particular tasks may include: (i) helping to complete a systematic literature review of best practices in online science journalism; (ii) helping to conduct and analyze qualitative interviews with online science journalists on how they produce science journalism for online audience; and (iii) helping to create and assess “test” journalism on the effectiveness of the models of online science journalism created during the project. Interested students should have: 1. A background in science or journalism/communications (ideally both); 2. Knowledge of how to conduct literature reviews (or a desire to learn systematic methods); 3. Completed courses in social science or scientific research methods. Additional skills that are an asset but not required: 3. Skills in digital media; 4. Work experience in journalism/communications. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 Concordia University – Montréal Québec David Secko 0 0 n/a English Development of a next-generation biomanufacturing platform for the conversion of greenhouse gases to value-added chemicals The uncertain price and tight supply of crude oil, and the considerable damage that society’s over-use of oil products has wreaked on the environment have created an urgent need to develop and implement sustainable manufacturing technologies for the production of cleaner fuels. This goal is especially relevant for Canada, whose annual per capita greenhouse gas emissions are amongst the highest in the world. Of the manufacturing alternatives that have been suggested, metabolic engineering is particularly promising since it strikes two birds with one stone. Not only are biomanufacturing processes that employ engineered biological systems the ultimate demonstration of green chemical manufacturing, but genetically manipulating microorganisms to directly convert carbon dioxide to useful products at industrial scales could also greatly mitigate the greenhouse gas content in the atmosphere. In fact, the fixation of carbon dioxide to liquid fuels by engineered microorganisms is poised to become one of the most prominent bioprocesses in Canada once oil production in Alberta’s tar sands ramps up to its installed capacity in the next few years. The tar sands occupy no more than 1.5% of the total landmass of Canada but are projected to account for nearly 20% of the nation’s carbon dioxide emissions by 2020, and the need to design and develop sustainable bioprocesses that can efficiently convert a major fraction of these emissions into liquid transportation fuel could not be more urgent. The development of an integrated gas-to-liquid biofuels manufacturing process will occur through four distinct project modules: (1) metabolic engineering of the bacterium Escherichia coli to express heterologous (or foreign) metabolic pathways derived from other microorganisms to produce the metabolite acetyl-CoA from carbon dioxide in copious quantities, (2) metabolic and enzyme engineering of E. coli to synthesise advanced (C8-C10) biofuels from acetyl-CoA, (3) co-expression and co-optimisation of the carbon dioxide-fixing and biofuels-producing metabolic pathways to demonstrate gas-to-liquid fuels production, and (4) development of a pilot-scale bioprocess to demonstrate integrated gas-to-liquid fuels production. Successful Globalink Research Fellows will be assigned to Module # 1. The candidates will work in a dynamic and multidisciplinary team comprising chemical engineers, chemists, biologists and process engineers who will be working on the other modules in parallel. The successful candidates will be assigned lead authorship and/or co-inventorship of all papers and/or patents that will result from this work, as well as the option to join the research group in the future as graduate students should he/she satisfactorily meet the goals of the project. The successful candidates should be students of science or engineering, have knowledge of analytical chemistry and molecular biology concepts and techniques, and demonstrate a strong potential to rapidly assimilate new concepts and master experimental methodologies. "The Stone Age did not end for lack of stone, and the Oil Age will end long before the world runs out of oil.” – Sheikh Zaki Yamani, Former Oil Minister of Saudi Arabia The oil industry has provided us with great wealth and power, fuel and energy, and materials and medicines for over 150 years. However, carbon dioxide released by the combustion of oil products has turned the planet into a sweltering greenhouse. Oceans are warming and glaciers are melting away, causing sea levels to rise. If this trend persists, human settlements in low-lying coastal areas could soon be inundated with sea water. A warming world also threatens to unleash infectious diseases like never before, and there is now a critical need to develop and implement sustainable chemical manufacturing technologies in order to ensure continued economic development and maintain stewardship of the environment. In the face of these enormous challenges, the use of engineered biological systems to convert greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and biomass-derived feedstocks into fuels, chemicals and materials offers a viable path forward towards greener manufacturing. Such biomanufacturing processes proceed under benign operating conditions, avoid the use of hazardous reagents and solvents, replace stoichiometric reagents with biocatalytic cycles, and are the ultimate demonstration of reaction intensification. To this end, our research group in the Department of Chemical Biological Engineering at the University of British Columbia implements metabolic and enzyme engineering to investigate, tailor and express biosynthetic enzymes in microorganisms such as yeast and bacteria and modify their native metabolic networks to synthesise better fuels and pharmaceuticals from greenhouse gases and biomass. We are particularly interested in (1) microbial metabolic engineering for the fixation of carbon dioxide, (2) the ensuing biosynthesis of advanced biofuels, and (3) the development of gas-to-liquid fuel biomanufacturing processes. Our research group is at the forefront of innovation in a strategic domain for Canada and British Columbia. We utilise cutting-edge analytical instruments and genetic engineering tools to precisely modulate and control the metabolic networks of microorganisms, and Globalink Research Fellows who will graduate from the group will be trained and equipped to lead the future Canadian and global bio-economy. The students will seek to genetically engineer the bacterium E. coli to express foreign metabolic pathways from a different genus of microorganisms that are known to natively fix carbon dioxide to acetyl-CoA. The students will initially design and construct a simple experimental setup to investigate carbon dioxide fixation using liquid cultures. A suitable growth medium will also be formulated using insights gained from published literature. Once the experimental system has been established, the students will experiment with pathway types and also express chrimera pathways comprising of individual enzymes derived from different pathways. The pathways will initially be expressed from a plasmid. Other variables that will be modulated in these experiments include the plasmid copy number, the gene copy numbers and promoter strength. The students will evaluate the performance of the foreign pathways by quantifying the pathway intermediates using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Metabolic fluxes will also be determined to identify pathway bottlenecks. Following optimisation of the pathway, the plasmid bearing the most efficient pathway construct will then be integrated into the chromosome of E. coli for stabilising gene expression, should it be required. Finally, the students will grow the most efficient carbon dioxide-fixing engineered strain in a bioreactor at the bench-scale and investigate approaches to improve the rate of transfer of carbon dioxide to the liquid growth medium and the relative rate of carbon dioxide fixation by the strains. Knowledge of or prior experience in the following techniques is desirable, though not required: 1. Cloning 2. Working with and manipulating DNA 3. Sterile cell culturing 4. Using and interpreting data generated in high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) 5. Analysing metabolic pathways and identifying bottlenecks 6. Evaluating and optimising culture performance by measuring growth rates and testing new growth medium formulations At the end of the project, the Globalink Research Fellows will acquire skills in the following domains: 1. Molecular biology 2. Metabolic pathway analysis and engineering 3. Strain engineering 4. Working with fermenters 5. Metabolic flux analysis 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 University of British Columbia – Vancouver British Columbia Vikramaditya Yadav 0 0 null English Linking Linguistics and Programming My research is currently focusing on the use of learning algorithms to classify programming language samples and to extract the characteristics most highly indicative of the classes identified by the algorithms. Koppel, Argamon Shimoni (2002) and Argamon et al. (2003, 2009) offered an approach in which French and English literary and historical texts were “mined” in order to classify the texts by author gender. These researchers utilized algorithms that learned what features are most important in classifying the texts by running the algorithm several times on a selection of pre-classified samples. During these repetitions various metrics were computed and updated based on the existence of particular features in the samples and whether or not the metrics are indicating a correct classification. After training the algorithm could then be used on non-classified texts, and also provided information on which features ended up being good indicators for the classification. Using this approach more than 80% accuracy was achieved, and the authors were able to identify previously unknown patterns in female and male language use. The authors note that rather than starting with a small hand-selected set of features deemed most likely to distinguish between categories, a very large set of lexical and quasi-syntactic features, chosen solely on the basis of their being more-or-less topic-independent, was used as the initial set of features to examine. This large set was then narrowed down by repeated application of the training algorithm (Koppel, Argamon Shimoni 2002). Such an approach could also be used on a corpus of program samples. We are currently gathering samples and developing software based on support vector machines (SVM). Our initial list of features will be based on those described by Buse Weimer (2010) in their article "Learning a metric for code readability"; however we will need to extend these further to incorporate more abstract ideas. For example, Argamon et al. (2003) noted that their results confirmed that male authors talk more about objects, while women talk more about relationships. This suggests that features in programming languages surrounding the design and use of classes and class hierarchies (used to represent relationships) might be useful to examine through such an approach. We all know that computers and computer-systems are an integral part of today's world. However, we have not (yet) found a way to get computers to write programs; thus this is a task that humans must take on. Furthermore, 70% of the effort put into most software projects is dominated by maintenance and evolution, implying that people are spending an inordinate amount of time reading and trying to understand programs that other people have written. Thus there is an impetus to understand how people use these artificial languages when they are writing computer programs, and particular interest in comprehensibility and readability. In addition to computer science there are many other areas in which researchers use various tools to understand how language is used. These areas include linguistics, psychology, english, sociology, and history, to name just a few. In recent years many researchers in these areas have turned to digital tools for analysis of text samples. These computer-based techniques, such as text mining, can allow the use of software in the identification of trends in language use that would take an enormous amount of human effort to discover simply by reading the text samples. For instance in sociolinguistics, once various sociolinguistic differences have been identified by computational means, traditional critical analysis methods can then be applied for further analysis (Argamon et al. 2009). Fascinating pieces of information, such as how particular groups of people (e.g. men, women, children, those of higher/lower socioeconomic status, etc.) utilise language in different ways can be extracted through the use of these tools. However none of these approaches have been used in application to programming languages. As programmers ourselves, we are aware that much of a programming language's use is restricted due to the necessity of strict syntax rules. However we are also aware that if we assign a particular problem to 25 different students, it is not unusual to receive 25 different programs. Thus there *must* be differences in the way the language can be used. There are two questions to ask: firstly, are these differences useful; for instance, are some approaches more easily understood by a reader, or in other words, more comprehensible/readable? Secondly, can we identify the characteristics behind these differences, and link them to sociolinguistic groups? The MITACS-funded student will be aiding my MSc student in the continuation of this work. While we are currently at the beginning stage of developing the software, I anticipate that by May 2015 we will have a significant code-base to work with, and so the MITACS-funded student will aid in the addition of features to use in the SVM classification. He/she will also aid in the collection and organization of the code samples. We have currently only gathered student programs for analysis, but by next year we hope to extend to professional work as well, and so the gathering of code samples, plus sociolinguistic information (e.g. gender, years of experience, knowledge of computer languages, knowledge of natural languages, and so on), will be the next stage of this work. Most importantly, the student will aid in the analysis and communication of the results, participating in discussions and preparing papers and reports. The student will need strong software development skills, preferably in C++ and/or Java, and as well good organizational and communication (written and verbal) skills. Knowledge of SVM algorithms would be an asset, but is not required. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of Lethbridge – Lethbridge Alberta Jacqueline Rice 0 0 null English Interaction between magnetic impurities on the surface of a Weyl semimetal The project focuses on studying the behavior of magnetic impurities on the surface of a Weyl semimetal. A Weyl semimetal is an example of “topological metal” – the metallic cousin of a topological insulator. The adjective “topological” means in this context that the metallic nature of the system is robust against (almost) arbitrary but smooth changes in the Hamiltonian that describes this system, just as the topology of a Möbius band is invariant under arbitrary stretching of the band, provided it is not torn. The Weyl semimetal is one of the latest topological states of matter to be predicted, and is currently a focus of intense study in condensed matter physics. It owes its name to the fact that its bulk elementary excitations behave as the left-handed and right-handed Weyl fermions of particle physics. The Weyl semimetal has been predicted to occur in various types of materials, ranging from solid-state materials such as pyrochlore iridates to systems of ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Experiments all around the world are currently under way to try to realize this new state of matter. An intriguing property of Weyl semimetals is the occurrence of disconnected Fermi arcs on their two-dimensional (2D) surface. The Fermi surface of a conventional 2D metal must be a continuous curve without boundary, because it separates unoccupied states from occupied states in momentum space. However, Fermi arcs are in principle possible on the surface of a 3D system. The shape of the Fermi surface in a conventional metal dictates many of its properties, such as magnetic and transport properties. One thus expects that the unusual disconnected nature of the Fermi arcs on the surface of a Weyl semimetal will make its properties qualitatively different from those of a conventional 2D metal. The project will focus on examining how two magnetic impurities interact with one another when deposited on the surface of a Weyl semimetal. While previous studies have considered nonmagnetic properties of the surface of a Weyl semimetal, such as the local density of states and Friedel oscillations, here we will consider magnetic (spin) properties. This is particularly interesting because the Fermi arcs on the surface of a Weyl semimetal are characterized by a nontrivial spin texture, similar to that of Dirac fermions on the surface of a 3D topological insulator. We expect that the combination of the disconnected nature of the Fermi arcs and their complex spin texture will give rise to a highly nontrivial type of interaction between magnetic impurities on the surface of a Weyl semimetal. The laws governing the behavior of atoms are simple, elegant, and few. But then how to account for the endless variety of forms which we observe matter to assume? Condensed matter physics, my field of study, seeks to explain these observations, and also to predict theoretically and discover experimentally new states of matter. Topological insulators, a new state of quantum matter, were predicted theoretically in 2005 and experimentally discovered in 2007. Science magazine noted topological insulators as among the top ten scientific discoveries of 2007, and a veritable explosion in condensed matter research followed. Like ordinary electrical insulators, topological insulators are insulating in the bulk; unlike them, they conduct electricity on their surface almost without dissipation. As such, they hold great promise for future generations of low-power electronic devices and may revolutionize information communication technologies. The surfaces of topological insulators might also provide the essential ingredient for a quantum computer, a computational device based on the laws of quantum mechanics that is poised to operate exponentially faster than a conventional computer. The pioneering years of theoretical topological insulator research, including my own work, focused on idealized models of topological insulators that ignored the electrostatic repulsive force between electrons and material imperfections. Recent experimental and theoretical developments, however, are now pointing the field in a new direction. There are indications that interactions between electrons, also known as correlations, and disorder effects may lead to novel and unexpected phenomena. To this end, my research program seeks to understand the effect of correlations in topological insulators, first in the absence and, ultimately, in the presence of disorder. Besides topological insulators, I am also interested in a broader variety of topics in condensed matter theory, including emergent phenomena in quantum many-body systems; other topological phases of matter such as topological superfluids and superconductors, quantum Hall liquids, and spin liquids; quantum transport in low-dimensional systems and semiconductor physics; fractionalization and strongly correlated systems; field theories of many-body systems and connections between condensed matter physics and high-energy physics. The project will contain both analytical and numerical components. The role of the student will be as follows: - Modify code previously developed by the faculty member to describe the electronic structure of a Weyl semimetal with a tight-binding model on the 3D cubic lattice; - Use this code to numerically calculate the surface Green’s function of the Weyl semimetal, using recursive matrix techniques and, if necessary, parallel computing techniques; - Derive analytically a formula expressing the interaction between two magnetic impurities in terms of the surface Green’s function, by way of second-order perturbation theory; - Write an article summarizing the obtained results that will be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. The faculty member will provide the student with access to computing facilities such as the WestGrid facilities of the Compute Canada network (www.westgrid.ca). The student’s research interests must include condensed matter physics and/or theoretical physics. The student should have a good knowledge of quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics (acquired via coursework), as well as a working knowledge of C/C++ and Matlab/Octave. Previous knowledge of solid state physics/condensed matter physics and/or quantum field theory is a plus. 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 University of Alberta – Edmonton Alberta Joseph Maciejko 0 0 null English Magnetoconductance of the quantum spin Hall state in InAs/GaSb quantum wells The project focuses on investigating theoretically the transport properties of InAs/GaSb semiconductor quantum wells in the presence of a magnetic field. This material was predicted in 2008 to realize the quantum spin Hall state, also known as the two-dimensional (2D) time-reversal invariant topological insulator. A 2D topological insulator is characterized by the presence of robust gapless edge states that can carry electrical currents on the boundary of the sample, while the bulk remains insulating. These edge states have the distinct property of being helical: electrons of opposite spin propagate in opposite directions. Because of this helical property, the edge states of the 2D topological insulator are immune against weak but arbitrary perturbations that preserve time-reversal symmetry. Indeed, an electron on the edge of a 2D topological insulator can only backscatter at the expense of undergoing a spin flip, which requires some form of time-reversal symmetry breaking. This implies that in the absence of time-reversal symmetry breaking perturbations, the conductance of a 2D topological insulator is a quantized property, even in the presence of (nonmagnetic) disorder on the edge of the sample. In the presence of time-reversal symmetry breaking perturbations however, theory predicts that the conductance of a 2D topological insulator can deviate from its quantized value given by 2e^2/h, where e is the electron charge and h is the Planck constant. The simplest way to test this prediction experimentally is to apply an external magnetic field, which breaks time-reversal symmetry explicitly. Such experiments were performed in 2007-2009 for the first-generation 2D topological insulator material HgTe/CdTe, and a clear suppression of the conductance in applied magnetic fields was observed, in agreement with theory. Recent experiments on the second-generation 2D topological insulator material InAs/GaSb appear to challenge this simple picture, however (see L. Du et al., arXiv:1306.1925). In particular, it is found that the conductance actually increases beyond 2e^2/h in strong applied magnetic fields. The goal of this project is to reconcile these puzzling experimental results with the theory of the quantum spin Hall effect. We will perform transport calculations using a realistic description of the electronic structure of InAs/GaSb quantum wells, which should allow for a quantitative comparison with experiments. The longitudinal conductance will be calculated using the Landauer-Büttiker approach to mesoscopic transport combined with a Green’s function method. Perpendicular and in-plane magnetic fields will be readily included in the calculation, as well as the effects of potential disorder. In particular, we will try to determine if strong perpendicular magnetic fields can induce a regime dominated by chiral edge transport rather than helical edge transport. The laws governing the behavior of atoms are simple, elegant, and few. But then how to account for the endless variety of forms which we observe matter to assume? Condensed matter physics, my field of study, seeks to explain these observations, and also to predict theoretically and discover experimentally new states of matter. Topological insulators, a new state of quantum matter, were predicted theoretically in 2005 and experimentally discovered in 2007. Science magazine noted topological insulators as among the top ten scientific discoveries of 2007, and a veritable explosion in condensed matter research followed. Like ordinary electrical insulators, topological insulators are insulating in the bulk; unlike them, they conduct electricity on their surface almost without dissipation. As such, they hold great promise for future generations of low-power electronic devices and may revolutionize information communication technologies. The surfaces of topological insulators might also provide the essential ingredient for a quantum computer, a computational device based on the laws of quantum mechanics that is poised to operate exponentially faster than a conventional computer. The pioneering years of theoretical topological insulator research, including my own work, focused on idealized models of topological insulators that ignored the electrostatic repulsive force between electrons and material imperfections. Recent experimental and theoretical developments, however, are now pointing the field in a new direction. There are indications that interactions between electrons, also known as correlations, and disorder effects may lead to novel and unexpected phenomena. To this end, my research program seeks to understand the effect of correlations in topological insulators, first in the absence and, ultimately, in the presence of disorder. Besides topological insulators, I am also interested in a broader variety of topics in condensed matter theory, including emergent phenomena in quantum many-body systems; other topological phases of matter such as topological superfluids and superconductors, quantum Hall liquids, and spin liquids; quantum transport in low-dimensional systems and semiconductor physics; fractionalization and strongly correlated systems; field theories of many-body systems and connections between condensed matter physics and high-energy physics. The project will contain mostly numerical components. The role of the student will be as follows: - Modify code previously developed by the faculty member to describe the electronic structure of InAs/GaSb quantum wells, using realistic tight-binding parameters derived from a k.p approach; - Use this code to numerically calculate lead self-energies, device Green’s functions, and the longitudinal conductance of a InAs/GaSb sample, in the presence of perpendicular and in-plane magnetic fields; - Introduce random potential disorder in the code and compute the disorder-averaged conductance; - Compare the results obtained numerically to existing numerical data; - Write an article summarizing the obtained results that will be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. The faculty member will provide the student with access to computing facilities such as the WestGrid facilities of the Compute Canada network (www.westgrid.ca). The student’s research interests must include condensed matter physics and/or theoretical physics. The student should have a good knowledge of quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics (acquired via coursework), as well as a working knowledge of C/C++ and Matlab/Octave. Previous knowledge of solid state physics/condensed matter physics and/or quantum field theory is a plus. 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 University of Alberta – Edmonton Alberta Joseph Maciejko 0 0 null English Strong correlation effects in a spinful Chern insulator The project focuses on investigating the effect of strong local interactions in a spinful Chern insulator, with the goal of discovering exotic topologically ordered phases in this system. The Chern insulator is the prototypical topological insulator. Theoretically predicted by Haldane in 1988, it corresponds to a realization of the integer quantum Hall effect in a lattice model in the absence of a net applied external magnetic field. While the integer quantum Hall effect was discovered in 1980, the Chern insulator was experimentally realized in 2013 only. Unlike the time-reversal invariant 2D topological insulator or quantum spin Hall state, the Chern insulator breaks time-reversal symmetry. It carries a single edge state that propagates in a given direction, and is thus termed chiral. In fact, the quantum spin Hall state can be understood as two copies of the Chern insulator, one for each spin of the electron but with opposite chiralities, such that the system preserves time-reversal symmetry as a whole. A major focus of current condensed matter research is the study of interaction effects in topological insulators. The physics of topological insulators is by now well understood under the approximation of neglecting the electrostatic Coulomb repulsion between electrons. However, in real materials electrons do interact, and one may ask how the physics of topological insulators is affected in the presence of such interactions. Although topological insulators are stable to weak interactions, much less is known about their behavior in the presence of strong interactions. The goal of the project is to investigate the behavior of a spinful Chern insulator in the presence of strong repulsive interactions. A spinful Chern insulator is a system composed of two copies of the Chern insulator, one for each spin of the electron but with the same chirality for both spins, unlike the quantum spin Hall state. Just like the original Chern insulator, the spinful Chern insulator breaks time-reversal symmetry. Recent analytical studies suggest that exotic topologically ordered phases may be realized in a spinful Chern insulator with strong on-site repulsive interactions. These phases exhibit properties such as spin-charge separation, fractional (anyonic) quantum statistics, and a ground-state degeneracy that depends only on the topology of the spatial manifold. To test these tantalizing predictions, we will use powerful numerical methods, the variational cluster approximation (VCA) and cluster perturbation theory (CPT), to construct the phase diagram of a model of spinful Chern insulator with strong Hubbard-type interactions with the hope of finding fractionalized phases. The laws governing the behavior of atoms are simple, elegant, and few. But then how to account for the endless variety of forms which we observe matter to assume? Condensed matter physics, my field of study, seeks to explain these observations, and also to predict theoretically and discover experimentally new states of matter. Topological insulators, a new state of quantum matter, were predicted theoretically in 2005 and experimentally discovered in 2007. Science magazine noted topological insulators as among the top ten scientific discoveries of 2007, and a veritable explosion in condensed matter research followed. Like ordinary electrical insulators, topological insulators are insulating in the bulk; unlike them, they conduct electricity on their surface almost without dissipation. As such, they hold great promise for future generations of low-power electronic devices and may revolutionize information communication technologies. The surfaces of topological insulators might also provide the essential ingredient for a quantum computer, a computational device based on the laws of quantum mechanics that is poised to operate exponentially faster than a conventional computer. The pioneering years of theoretical topological insulator research, including my own work, focused on idealized models of topological insulators that ignored the electrostatic repulsive force between electrons and material imperfections. Recent experimental and theoretical developments, however, are now pointing the field in a new direction. There are indications that interactions between electrons, also known as correlations, and disorder effects may lead to novel and unexpected phenomena. To this end, my research program seeks to understand the effect of correlations in topological insulators, first in the absence and, ultimately, in the presence of disorder. Besides topological insulators, I am also interested in a broader variety of topics in condensed matter theory, including emergent phenomena in quantum many-body systems; other topological phases of matter such as topological superfluids and superconductors, quantum Hall liquids, and spin liquids; quantum transport in low-dimensional systems and semiconductor physics; fractionalization and strongly correlated systems; field theories of many-body systems and connections between condensed matter physics and high-energy physics. The project will contain mostly numerical components, and will be done in collaboration with Dr. David Sénéchal at Université de Sherbrooke. The role of the student will be as follows: - Use software made available by the faculty member to implement the Hamiltonian of the spinful Chern insulator with Hubbard interaction; - Using this software, compute physical observables such as energy gaps, order parameters and correlation functions that will allow us to construct the phase diagram of the system; - Compare the results to analytical predictions of fractionalized phases such as the chiral spin liquid (CSL) and the fractionalized Chern insulator (CI*); - Write an article summarizing the obtained results that will be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. The faculty member will provide the student with access to computing facilities such as the WestGrid facilities of the Compute Canada network (www.westgrid.ca). The student’s research interests must include condensed matter physics and/or theoretical physics. The student should have a good knowledge of quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics (acquired via coursework), as well as a working knowledge of C/C++ and Matlab/Octave. Previous knowledge of solid state physics/condensed matter physics and/or quantum field theory is a plus. 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 University of Alberta – Edmonton Alberta Joseph Maciejko 0 0 null English Creating evidence to better support transitions from residential to community based locations of care Often entry into a residential care facility is a last resort, when physical and cognitive deterioration results in high level of care needs that exceed the availability of personal and community supports. Residential care facilities are increasingly becoming places where older adults receive care until death. Few transition back to the community. Although it has been suggested that a substantial proportion of individuals residing in residential care in Northern British Columbia do not exhibit the clinical need for this level of care the actual prevalence and clinical profiles of these unique residents is currently unknown. These persons may require an alternative setting of care [ASC] where their care needs may more appropriately be met in non-institutional community based settings. A potential solution to address the increasing numbers of ASC persons in residential care who do not exhibit the clinical need for this intensive level of care may be discharge with support to community settings. In partnership with Northern Health (NH) this mixed methods study will expand understanding of ASC in three phases. In phase one (secondary data analyses); person-specific health and clinical data will be analyzed for all persons assessed for care in NH to determine the prevalence of ASC residents in residential care. Bivariate, multivariate, and thematic analyses will profile ASC persons in residential care compared and contrasted to all persons assessed for care in NH. Phase two (qualitative analyses) will examine ASC persons’ preferences, and the preferences of their family/caregivers, for location of care including perspectives on potential discharge to community based care settings (such as private residences, retirement homes, or assisted living). These findings will identify resources and supports necessary to facilitate this transition in a rural and remote context. Together, findings from phase one and two will inform development of a phase three pilot project to support transition for residents back to the community. Considering the increases in pressures on limited health care resources, reducing the demand for residential services by supporting the relocation of ASC residents from residential care back to the community has the potential for significant impact. A move to residing in the community not only has potential for positively impacting the health and quality of life of the person but also has potential for financial cost-saving implications for health policy decision makers. Findings may also be applicable to other regional jurisdictions to inform similar challenges with the emerging population of ASC residents in residential care. Dr. Martha MacLeod, PhD, RN, is a leading Canadian expert in rural and remote health services research and a proven leader and mentor in knowledge translation and implementation science. As Professor and Chair of the School of Nursing and Professor in the Health Sciences at the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC), Dr. MacLeod teaches and mentors graduate students and researchers in the areas of qualitative and mixed methods research, knowledge development and mobilization, and moving evidence into practice. She employs a person-centered approach to mentoring the next generation of health scientists at all levels with an emphasis on building and fostering community-based research partnerships. With proven strengths and expertise in human health resources and organizational change in rural settings, Dr. MacLeod fosters collaborative research programs bridging practice and academia. She leads the Rural and Northern Practice and its Development Research Program, a networked research unit comprising over 30 students, researchers, academics, clinicians, decision makers, and senior health services administrators. Her research most often employs a qualitative or mixed methods approach to examining health services and health human resources, with particular attention to rural and northern context. As the leader of a diverse, multidisciplinary team, with expertise in integrated knowledge translation, Dr. MacLeod has published and presented widely on rural and northern nursing issues, nursing practice, nursing education, and knowledge mobilization. Dr. MacLeod is also active in developing national and regional multidisciplinary research and knowledge translation networks. Dr. MacLeod has built a strong research partnership with BC's Northern Health Authority. She co-leads the UNBC Health Research Institute and co-chairs the Steering Committee for the UNBC-Northern Health Memorandum of Agreement. Currently, Dr. MacLeod is the primary investigator examining implementation of a person-centered, needs-based approach to health services in Northern Health. Dr. MacLeod is also leading a pan-Canadian study on the nature of rural and remote nursing practice. Dr. MacLeod employs her expertise in research methodology, knowledge translation, and rural health research to make a difference in the health and well-being of rural communities/populations. The student and supervisor will analyze primary and secondary data to create health profiles and characterize person and community contextual features, barriers, and facilitators affecting feasibility of ALC residents’ in LTC to transition to community settings. The student may have opportunity to visit local research sites and participate directly in knowledge exchange activities with community stakeholders. The student will be directly involved in applying findings from these analyses to develop an intervention strategy framed within a ‘knowledge to action’ process to support residents who do not meet the clinical need for residential care and who desire to transition from their residential home to a more appropriate community care setting. It is expected that the student prepare written and oral reports on their research findings to be disseminated to research partners and community stakeholders. In addition, the student will be expected to write a manuscript to disseminate their research findings to a larger audience. Required • Health sciences, population/public health, social sciences background • High personal motivation, detail-orientated • Take responsibility meeting deadlines and making progress without direct supervision • Ability to think outside the box to develop innovate and creative solutions • Enjoy interacting with people • Enthusiasm and willingness to learn new software and research methods • Ability to: o Perform literature search and synthesize information in a timely manner o Prepare tables, graphs, fact sheets and written reports o Prepare manuscripts suitable for publication • Proficient using Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) Preferred • Experience using SAS • Interest in aging/gerontology 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 University of Northern British Columbia – Prince George British Columbia Martha MacLeod 0 1 Northern Health Authority English Development of next-generation DFB laser systems for quantum optics and precision atomic spectroscopy MITACS students will be working on a technical project of developing highly stable DFB laser systems for precision atomic spectroscopy and quantum optics experiments. An innovative design with an optical fiber feedback allows the frequency stabilization of single-mode DFB diode laser with a quality factor of 10^12 (~ 1kHz linewidth). The monolithic laser cavity design allows passive mechanical stability. This work will involve CAD designs, in particular SolidWorks, for drawing the mechanical layout for precision CNC machining, Matlab/C/C++ simulations for the optical Bloch equations, and experience in control theory and designing PID electronics. The machined block will then be put together by the student and demonstrate narrow-linewidth lasing. By building two of these systems, beat note spectroscopy will demonstrate the linewidth of the laser. Using a high bandwidth fiber-stretching modules, the optical phase of the return loop from a gold coated fiber tip is stabilized to lock the laser to a narrowline transition for a Cesium reference cell by a nonlinear modulation transfer spectroscopy. This project will help the student to gain the necessary experience to begin and carry out cutting edge research in atomic physics. My research lies at the multidisciplinary boundary between experimental quantum optics, atomic physics, and condensed matter physics. A unifying theme of my work is the effort to expand the entanglement frontier well beyond “single” quantum systems. By designing macroscopic quantum states from the “bottom-up” with ultracold Rydberg atoms and single photons near nanoscale structures, we plan to elucidate the macroscopic quantum nature of strongly correlated systems. I believe that this constitutes a singularly important scientific program for future research in the strong coupling regime with optical photons and single atoms. 1. Emergence of non-equilibrium quantum phases from driven dipolar quantum matter. Emphasis on this project will be upon open quantum system dynamics of dipolar interacting, driven Rydberg gases. The competition between coherent Rydberg interaction and dissipative many-body dynamics could drive the system into novel non-equilibrium quantum phases, exhibiting extremely massive entangled steady states, topological order, and quantum-coherent crystallization dynamics, heretofore not existed in the natural world [Phys. Rev. Lett. (2014)]. 2. Extreme quantum nonlinear optics with Rydberg polariton. By placing ultracold Rydberg samples in optical cavities, propagating polaritonic modes can be coherently excited. Dipole-dipole interaction between polaritonic excitations could provide a collisional cross-section for propagating optical photons, leading to extraordinarily rich quantum states such as photon-photon bound molecules. The extremely nonlinear nature of this process provides the physical means to realize novel quantum information processors. 3. Strongly coupled light and matter with photonic crystals. Photonic crystals represent an important class of distributed Bragg devices at the nanoscale. By trapping single atoms in these crystals, we realize a “waveguide” QED system (i.e., a Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard Lattice), where atomic/optical excitations coherently hop over the lattice elements with on-site interaction provided by photon blockade. The resulting system dynamics is similar to that of a Bose-Hubbard model. In our project, we plan to create effective long-range spin-spin interaction provided by virtual photon exchanges among the trapped atoms to elucidate extended Bose-Hubbard physics [Nature Comm. (2014)]. The student will take a principal role of designing the laser cavity with optical fibers. Due to the time constraints, part of the work will already be done before the student's arrival. Before the project officially begins in 2015 May, there will be a preliminary reading project for the student to read the necessary literatures. In the mean time, most of the equipment will be purchased for the student to carry out the experiment and assemble the parts. A crucial aspect of the project is to implement a Doppler-free absorption and EIT spectroscopy on room-temperature Cesium atoms in a glass cell. The MITACS student will thereby gain extensive experiences in laser spectroscopy, optimal control and feedback theory, and atom-light interactions. Doppler-free atomic spectroscopy is a model system for undergraduate students to explore diverse aspects of AMO physics. So I believe that they will get some chances to do some "real physics" by the time this technical project is competed (e.g., slow-light effects and EIT/quantum beat spectroscopy). This laser system will be an integral part of driving laser transitions in ultracold Rydberg atoms. While not required, it is preferred that the applicant has some experience in electronics design, CAD designs, machine shop training, or laser safety training. 1 May, 2015 1 September, 2015 University of Waterloo – Waterloo Ontario Kyung Soo Choi 0 0 null English Nanomagnetism in the world's smallest magnetic antidots: Numerical simulations of magnetic domains In order to fulfill the continuous growing demand for larger storage capacities, smaller devices, and faster data transfer rates at reduced energy consumption, the technologies are heading toward real nanoscale devices. In the past, this has always been achieved by improving patterning technology. However, now we are at the crossroads where fundamentally new physical effects arise due to quantization and interaction phenomena. With nanopatterning, materials with completely new properties are at the horizon. Our research is exploring this horizon using novel nanopatterned thin film systems and studying their magnetism to identy new medias and technologies. Recently, SQUID magnetometry experiments revealed that the existence of the NiFe (permalloy) antidots and their orientation with respect to the applied field was found to have a profound effect on the magnetic properties. Depending on the orientation of the nanoscale (10 x 10 x 15 nm) antidots with respect to the applied field, differences in the coercivity, and exchange-bias field were observed – it is believed currently that this may be due to difference in the demagnetization fields. However this interpretation requires numerical simulation work. The research project will involve micromagnetic (numerical) simulations of the nano-antidots using the Object Oriented MicroMagnetic Framework (OOMMF) code and programs. Simulations will be used to reveal the physical mechanisms responsible for many of the features identified by the magnetism experiments. Follow-up experiments that the simulations may reveal to further understanding of the magnetism in these constrained geometries will be performed in-house with the candidate. This work will identify the missing physics necessary to understand the magnetism in these highly unique samples (e.g. smallest nano-antidot thin-film systems created to-date using a deep UV lithography technique at a synchrotron light source) and are sure to result in high-impact publications. The Nanomagnetism Research Group's research programs exist at the exciting convergence of materials physics and chemistry. We use cutting edge experimental techniques to make, identify and understand the structure/composition/magnetism relationships in nanoscaled systems (e.g. nanoparticle and thin films) and magnetic materials with similar constrained geometries. Research programs involve active collaborations with world-class experts in the theory of contemporary magnetism and simulations. We also pursue actively research enabling applications of nanomagnetic and nanoscale systems; drug delivery, hyperthermia, new catalyic materials and power applications are examples. The fundamental physics driven research programs of the Nanomagnetism Research Group will make possible the next generation of devices and applications based on controlled magnetism at the nanoscale by following three complementary themes. One is to understand the surface, core and interaction properties of magnetic nanoparticles. That is, magnetic metals and oxides with sizes 1-100×10-9 m that have approximately 1020 fewer atoms then the average bulk magnetic sample. Finite-size effects rule at these length scales. The second thrust area is to use nanoparticle assemblies in amorphous and precisely ordered three dimensional lattice forms to design systems that exhibit a collective state transition that would mark a fundamentally new regime with nanoparticle properties no longer relevant to a thermally activated process. Central to both of these research thrusts is nanoparticle sample synthesis and characterization. Our third research thrust area is in thin-film magnetism (layers of magnetic materials that are a few to tens of nanometers thick). Specifically, we study the magnetism that is the result of exchange coupling and magnetic frustration at the interface of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic materials (exchange bias). To develop a complete picture of nanoscale magnetism, one must probe across a range of time and length scales. A consistent description must emerge from local and bulk magnetic measurements. Simultaneously, the static and dynamic magnetic disorder must be decoupled. To achieve this, we employ a wide variety of experimental techniques that measure magnetism from the bulk to the atomic scale with time-scales that range from static to 10-13s. This grant will be used to sponsor an undergraduate summer research student. The candidate will be trained in the necessary programming and numerical simulation techniques for the work on the NiFe and NiFe/NiO nano-antidots. Once the candidate is brought up to speed on the methods and tools, they will be able to work independently (with initially daily meetings evolving to biweekly as the candidate becomes more adept) under my active supervision. Candidates with some interest in experimental physics research in addition to the simulation work will be trained in experimental methods such as low-temperature work (liquid helium temperatures) and high magnetic field measurements using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based magnetometer. In addition, the candidate will be able to leverage the research training and project as a central component of further graduate studies and research. The candidate should have a solid background in physics or materials science. Experience with computers and programming (e.g. C or C++) would be an asset, as would some background computational physics or numerical techniques. The project will involve data modeling and simulations using techniques based on, e.g. Landau-Lifshitz Gilbert models, to provide deeper insights in the magnetism of the samples. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of Manitoba – Winnipeg Manitoba Johan van Lierop 0 0 null English Numerical simulations of magnetism in nanostripes: The case of NiFe and NiFe/NiO nanostripes made using nanoscale templating In order to fulfill the continuous growing demand for larger storage capacities, smaller devices, and faster data transfer rates at reduced energy consumption, the technologies are heading toward real nanoscale devices. In the past, this has always been achieved by improving patterning technology. However, now we are at the crossroads where fundamentally new physical effects arise due to quantization and interaction phenomena. With nanopatterning, materials with completely new properties are at the horizon. Our research is exploring this horizon using novel nanopatterned thin film systems and studying their magnetism to identy new medias and technologies. Recently, SQUID magnetometry experiments revealed that the existence of the nanostripes and their orientation with respect to the applied field was found to have a profound effect on the magnetic properties. Depending on the orientation of the nanostripes with respect to the applied field, differences in the superparamagnetic blocking temperature, coercivity, and exchange-bias field were observed mainly because of the difference in the demagnetization fields. The research project will involve micromagnetic (numerical) simulations of the nanostripes (e.g. simulations of 20 nm high and 15 nm wide and 1000 nm long NiFe (Permalloy) stripes, and NiFe/NiO stripes) using the Object Oriented MicroMagnetic Framework (OOMMF) code and programs. Simulations will be used to reveal the physical mechanisms responsible for many of the features identified by the magnetism experiments. Follow-up experiments that the simulations may reveal to further understanding of the magnetism in these constrained geometries will be performed in-house with the candidate. This work will identify the missing physics necessary to understand the magnetism in these highly unique samples (e.g. smallest nanostripe or nanostripe thin-film systems created to-date using a deep UV lithography technique at a synchrotron light source) and are sure to result in high-impact publications. The Nanomagnetism Research Group's research programs exist at the exciting convergence of materials physics and chemistry. We use cutting edge experimental techniques to make, identify and understand the structure/composition/magnetism relationships in nanoscaled systems (e.g. nanoparticle and thin films) and magnetic materials with similar constrained geometries. Research programs involve active collaborations with world-class experts in the theory of contemporary magnetism and simulations. We also pursue actively research enabling applications of nanomagnetic and nanoscale systems; drug delivery, hyperthermia, new catalyic materials and power applications are examples. The fundamental physics driven research programs of the Nanomagnetism Research Group will make possible the next generation of devices and applications based on controlled magnetism at the nanoscale by following three complementary themes. One is to understand the surface, core and interaction properties of magnetic nanoparticles. That is, magnetic metals and oxides with sizes 1-100×10-9 m that have approximately 1020 fewer atoms then the average bulk magnetic sample. Finite-size effects rule at these length scales. The second thrust area is to use nanoparticle assemblies in amorphous and precisely ordered three dimensional lattice forms to design systems that exhibit a collective state transition that would mark a fundamentally new regime with nanoparticle properties no longer relevant to a thermally activated process. Central to both of these research thrusts is nanoparticle sample synthesis and characterization. Our third research thrust area is in thin-film magnetism (layers of magnetic materials that are a few to tens of nanometers thick). Specifically, we study the magnetism that is the result of exchange coupling and magnetic frustration at the interface of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic materials (exchange bias). To develop a complete picture of nanoscale magnetism, one must probe across a range of time and length scales. A consistent description must emerge from local and bulk magnetic measurements. Simultaneously, the static and dynamic magnetic disorder must be decoupled. To achieve this, we employ a wide variety of experimental techniques that measure magnetism from the bulk to the atomic scale with time-scales that range from static to 10-13s. This grant will be used to sponsor an undergraduate summer research student. The candidate will be trained in the necessary programming and numerical simulation techniques for the work on the NiFe and NiFe/NiO nanostripes. Once the candidate is brought up to speed on the methods and tools, they will be able to work independently (with initially daily meetings evolving to biweekly as the candidate becomes more adept) under my active supervision. Candidates with some interest in experimental physics research in addition to the simulation work will be trained in experimental methods such as low-temperature work (liquid helium temperatures) and high magnetic field measurements using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based magnetometer. In addition, the candidate will be able to leverage the research training and project as a central component of further graduate studies and research. The candidate should have a solid background in physics or materials science. Experience with computers and programming (e.g. C or C++) would be an asset, as would some background computational physics or numerical techniques. The project will involve data modeling and simulations using techniques based on, e.g. Landau-Lifshitz Gilbert models, to provide deeper insights in the magnetism of the samples. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of Manitoba – Winnipeg Manitoba Johan van Lierop 0 0 null English Laboratory testing of a vertical river kinetic turbine Limited fossil fuel resources and global warming issue have brought the world’s attention towards renewable and green energy resources. Hydro has the highest energy density among renewable resources. Traditional hydro technology harnesses power of the water’s potential energy by storing the water behind dams. However, emerging hydro kinetic turbines can harness power of the kinetic energy of the flow. Kinetic turbines do not need dams or any large renewable resources. Remote communities in north of Canada can take advantage of kinetic turbine technology as several rivers drain into Hudson Bay and Arctic Ocean. The University of Manitoba, New Energy Corporation, and Clean Current along with assistance from Manitoba Hydro demonstrated that kinetic turbines could be operated in adverse winter conditions in Manitoba; the consortium successfully grid connected several kinetic turbines on the Winnipeg River. The major objective of the current research is to understand the impact of flow structures in rivers—turbulence, water boils, surface rapids—such that maximum energy is extracted from a specific area. Basic theories suggest high current velocity locations to maximize the power production. In these theories, a uniform velocity is assumed for the upstream conditions, thus the performance of the turbine is primarily a function of the mean velocity of the flow. However, natural river currents are almost never steady in their strength and direction. Detailed measurements in-situ show local temporal changes in the velocity value which are due to the vortices carried by the flow. This situation happens when the turbine is located in a river that generates wake and turbulent flow due to (1) rapid changes in the profile of river bed and banks; (2) presence of large boulders and ice floes that generate flow structures; (3) manmade obstructions like a bridge peer or from upstream kinetic turbines in a farm arrangement; and (4) rapid river level changes leading to hydraulic jumps, air entrainment and formation of large boils. In this project our focus is to assess the performance of the vertical and horizontal turbines under a non-uniform upstream current effect. A scaled vertical turbine has been designed and manufactured at the University of Manitoba. This scaled turbine is tested in the water tunnel facilities of the University of Manitoba to study the effects of non-uniformity of upstream current on the performance of the vertical turbine. The scaled vertical turbine is a unique facility designed and built for this project. These turbines are capable to work in both water and wind. The configuration of the turbine is flexible and can operate within the entire region of the power curve for different tip speed ratios. NSERC/Manitoba Hydro Industrial Research Chair in Alternative Energy: Perform research and development in alternative energy technologies using numerical modelling and experimental facilities. Research focus is in the area of understanding and predicting icing on wind turbine blades; modelling and development of high velocity kinetic turbines; developing a numerical model for a swine anaerobic digester and developing a low cost lagoon-type digester for cold climates, and biomass conversion technologies for distributed power generation. Current research activities include: • Kinetic Turbines: develop numerical models to predict the behaviour of high kinetic turbine; use experimental data from water tunnel to validate model; use numerical tools to develop low cost kinetic turbine for velocities above 3 m/s. • Distributed biopower systems: Developed with collaborators two new distributed power technologies to significantly reduce size and cost of distributed biopower and heat recovery systems for applications below 5 MWe. Focus is on integrating heat and power application as part of overall design. Investigating the use of biopower to remove Phosphor from Lake Winnipeg by harvesting cattails. • Anaerobic Digesters: Develop numerical anaerobic digester model to predict the flow and digestion of swine manures to maximize higher heating value of biogas for cold weather applications. Extending the governing equations of ADM1 from a bulk model to three dimensions is achieved by including spatial variables in the derivation. The introduction of spatial resolution changes a differential-algebraic equation set to a partial differential algebraic equation set, and few suitable solvers exist. • Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles: Developing simulator of alternative energy vehicles to predict component behaviour and system performance and retrofit systems to convert vehicles to PHEV. • Optimization of Distributed Renewable Energy Systems: A crucial aspect of renewable energy systems is the integration of low density renewable energy sources and the optimal utilization of conversion and storage technologies. • Wind Icing: perform experimental investigation in icing tunnel using PIV and force balance to understand the mechanism of icing on wind turbine blades; determine ways to mitigate the icing issue using scale models of wind turbines. We require a student to assist our research team to work on the experimental data gathering using a data acquisition system already set up. Data analysis is then required and can be done mostly using a spreadsheet to extract coefficients. For this part student must be proficient with Excel and know how to work with basic Matlab functions. In addition, the student will have interactions with the machine shop technician to fabricate new experimental components. 1- Background in Fluid Mechanics or Aerospace Engineering. 2- Having adequate Mathematics background. 3- Having prior experimental experiences is an asset. 4- Skilled in Microsoft Excel. 5- Familiar with Matlab software. 6- Knowledge of drawing software SolidWorks 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of Manitoba – Winnipeg Manitoba Eric Bibeau 0 1 Manitoba Hydro, Clean Current English Uncertainty associated with snowfall measurement at the ground Accurately measuring solid precipitation is challenging due to a variety of reasons. It has been recognized that systematic errors in snowfall measurements are often observed due to the gauge geometry and the associated weather conditions. For example, the higher the wind speed during a snowfall event, the lower the collection efficiency of the precipitation gauge. The deflection of the airflow in the vicinity of the gauge will influence the trajectory of precipitation. This often prevents the precipitation to fall in the gauge and to be measured. Currently snowfall data can be adjusted using a linear function decreasing with increasing wind speed. However, it does not take into account the scatter in the data for a given wind speed. Errors of up to 50 % are often observed for the same wind speed. It has been found recently that the type of snowflake is responsible for such an error in the data. The different types of snow crystals, which fall at different terminal velocities, may interact differently with the flow around the gauge. For example, fast-falling snowflakes are associated with higher collection efficiency than the slow-falling snowflakes. The goal of this project is to study the possible link among the precipitation characteristics, collection efficiency and wind speed to develop a transfer function for data adjustment. To address this, theoretical calculation as well as data analysis will be conducted. First, numerical simulations of snowflake trajectories will be conducted using a Lagrangian model initialized with a flow field associated with a precipitation gauge. The flow field is obtained from computational fluid dynamics simulations. Theses trajectories will be used to compute theoretical collection efficiency. Second, data collected during the winter season will be analyzed and compared to the theory. The data set includes measurement of bulk density, terminal velocity, shape of precipitation as well as wind speed, temperature, relative humidity and precipitation rates measured by different gauges. The results will illustrate a potential link between measurement, snowflake characteristics and wind speed. This will lead to improve our understanding of the effect of wind and the type of snowflakes on the measured snow accumulation at the ground. The findings will guide us in our current efforts to improve methods to develop more robust methods to measure winter precipitation at the ground. The different types of precipitation associated with winter storms can cause major inconveniences for our societies such as major power outages to disruption of air and ground transportation. The key factor responsible is often the types of precipitation. They can be on the form of freezing rain, ice pellets, wet snow and snow. Their formation mechanisms are complex because they are associated with temperatures around 0°C meaning that only a small change in temperature can affect dramatically the severity of the storm. The phase changes involved in their formation and evolution through the atmosphere lead to a variation of temperature and, in turn, affect the dynamics of the storm. It is essential to study the formation mechanisms of these types of precipitation but it is also critical to accurately measure the amount of precipitation reaching the ground. The main problem associated with ground measurement is the deflection of the flow in the vicinity of the precipitation gauge orifice. This can cause up to a 50 % under-catch of solid precipitation, which introduce some difficulties for weather models validation. The objective of my research program is to better understand the formation of winter precipitation and the associated impacts on the mesoscale circulation induced by phase changes and the measurement at the ground. Numerical modelling is the key tool to achieve this goal. However, in some instances, it is important to also collect specific observations at the ground for model validation since very little detailed observations of winter precipitation types is available. A better understanding of precipitation is essential for weather forecasting and climate change studies. At present, the weather forecasting models are limited with respect to the prediction of winter precipitation. Fundamental processes related to the formation of precipitation and their evolution to the surface remain largely unknown. In addition, the validation of the solid precipitation simulated by models is almost impossible during the winter season because of the high uncertainties associated with the measurement of solid precipitation on the ground. Consequently, my research contributes to improve our understanding of short term forecast of winter precipitation and the variation of their occurrence with our changing climate. The role of the student in the project is to analyze the available data and conduct numerical experiments. First, the student will have to become familiar with the research topic by conducting a brief literature review. Second, the data analysis will be conducted. This step involves learning how to use specialized software and programming language such as Matlab and Fortran, respectively. Furthermore, it is important for the student to understand how the weather instruments works to conduct a precise analysis. This will allows the candidate to be able to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the data collected by the instrument in order to perform an accurate data quality control. Third, numerical simulations of the collection efficiency of gauges will be conducted. This step includes learning how to run a Lagrangian model, which counts the number of particles falling in the gauge. The results will be used to compute the theoretical catch-efficiency of the precipitation gauge. Finally, the results of this project will be included in a wider study that focuses on the efficiency of the reference gauge-shield configuration. It will contribute to improve our understanding of the interaction of precipitation types and the flow field in the vicinity of the gauge to improve the accuracy of the measurement. The candidate should have a background in atmospheric sciences, physics, or a related topic. Some experience in computer programming (ex: Fortran, Matlab) is preferred because it is the main research tool used to develop models and analyze data. The Université du Québec à Montréal is a French speaking university located downtown Montreal, Canada. The work environment is mainly in French, therefore some speaking and writing skills in French is an asset. However, the candidate should keep in mind that most of the scientific literature needed to conduct this research project is in English. 18 May, 2015 21 August, 2015 Université du Québec à Montréal – Montréal Québec Julie Mireille Theriault 0 0 null English Efficient and Scalable Asymmetric Message Queues for MPI Rational: Efficiency and scalability of MPI (Message Passing Interface) message queue subsystem is of great importance to the research community. MPI libraries typically maintain two queues: a queue of unexpected messages, Unexq, and a queue of posted receives, Recvq. When a message is received from the network, the Recvq is first checked for a matching receive, and if no matching is found, the message is enqueued in Unexq. Similarly, when a receive call is posted, the Unexq is first checked for a matching message, and if no matching is found, the receive call is enqueued in Recvq. The search time is critical for most large-scale applications, and this situation will be magnified in the Exascale era. Processes in MPI applications typically communicate more with a subset of other processes, or send important control messages as in the Rendezvous protocol or in the collective algorithms. Each process can have a list of partners, and partnership can be defined based on the volume, frequency or burst of communications with other processes or nodes, individual message sizes, or even the importance of the message contents. In this context, we might be able to improve the performance and scalability of the message queue subsystem by leveraging the notion of partner traffic in MPI. Research Objectives: This research aims at understanding whether partner/non-partner traffic can be effectively used to speed up MPI message queue operations. We will try to answer some of the key questions: 1) Can we gather all statistics for MPI message queues at runtime, and update our message queue data structure dynamically? 2) Can we nicely define the definition of partnership? Can we make it adaptive? What thresholds should we use? 3) Can we propose a better message queue mechanism that can benefit from partner/non-partner traffic? To reduce the queue search time, can we design an asymmetric message queue subsystem where more communication resources or faster communication paths would be allocated to busier or more important communications? Can we allocate a dedicated queue of unexpected messages and a dedicated queue of posted receives for partner processes for each process? The idea is that when unexpected messages from partners or posted receives for partners are in their dedicated queues, they should be quickly searched and found. Research Steps: 1) We will study different communication characteristics of MPI applications, such as message size, message frequency, message volume, message queue length, number of partners, maximum and minimum queue search time, length of the time an item spends in the Unexp or Recvq, etc. 2) Partnership can be defined based on a wide range of metrics. An important part of this research is to discover the most advantageous of the metrics and how they can be utilized to reduce the queue search time and thus improve the performance. Both static and dynamic runtime partner profiling will be studied. 3) We will design and implement an adaptive message queue structure using dedicated message queues for partner traffic in open-source MPI implementations. Research in the area of high-performance computing systems has been primarily focused on how to improve the performance of computers in order to solve computationally intensive problems and support the emerging networking and commercial applications. Parallel processing is at the heart of such powerful computers. The Parallel Processing Research Laboratory carries out research in the main areas of parallel and distributed processing, network-based high-performance computing, and power-aware high-performance computing. We are interested in the various innovative techniques that could be effectively used at different layers to enhance the performance, and/or to minimize the power/energy consumption in high-performance parallel computing systems. Our research, in part, seeks to propose, design and evaluate innovative techniques for high-performance communication subsystems and runtime systems for high-performance clusters and data centers. We are interested in research along several directions related to InfiniBand, iWARP Ethernet, RoCE, and other RDMA-enabled interconnects, and the design and development of user-level and high-level communication and programming layers to support efficient execution and development of parallel applications using MPI, PGAS (UPC, etc.), GPUs (CUDA, OpenCL), many-core accelerators (Intel Xeon Phi), among others. In addition, with the increasing amount of power/energy consumption in high-performance computing and data centers, our research is, in part, concerned with proposing novel ideas to reduce power consumption and improve energy efficiency with little or no impact on performance. Workload characterization of scientific, engineering and commercial applications as well as benchmarking and performance evaluation of parallel programming paradigms and high-performance computing systems is an integral part of our research. We are currently working on a number of areas including ‪topology-aware communication, communication/computation overlap and message progression, high-performance networking for data centers, collective offloading, MPI message queues, hybrid CPU/GPU computing, RMA interface, QoS-aware message-passing, RDMAoE and converged networking, congestion control aware communication, interaction between network stacks and multi-core systems, among others.‬ The overall research steps were discussed above. In a nutshell, 1. The student will first study the MPI standard. 2. The student will learn the issues involved in MPI message queues. 3. The student will read relevant research papers in the field. 4. The student will examine how message queues are designed and implemented in open-source MPI implementations, such as MVAPICH and/or OpenMPI. 5. The student will run MPI applications in HPC clusters, and gathers the required statistics among the participating partner/non-partner processes 6. Based on the data gathered in previous stage, different partnership mechanisms will be defined. 7. The MPI message queue internals in open source MPI implementations will be revised and enhanced to support the notion of partner/non-partner traffic. 8. The student will study the performance and scalability of the proposed techniques compared to traditional approaches. Experience in C programming Familiarity with data structures Familiarity with Linux Familiarity with MPI and networking is an asset. 1 May, 2015 1 September, 2015 Queen's University – Kingston Ontario Ahmad Afsahi 0 0 null English Mining Mobile Software Repositories Did you ever wonder how hard it is develop an iPhone or Android app? Did you ever wonder who works on these apps? How hard is it compared to developing the Firefox web browser? At the Software Analysis and Intelligence Lab (SAIL -- http://sail.cs.queensu.ca/) we are trying to answer these questions. We are part of a team of researchers worldwide looking at this new type of software development, called mobile software development. Today, software engineering research focuses on traditional software systems like the Firefox web browser or Microsoft Windows, which take years to develop and teams of designers, developers and debuggers. Software engineering is rapidly changing though. Emerging domains, such as mobile devices, are growing rapidly and depend heavily on new software operating systems like Android and the applications that they run, commonly referred to as apps. The mobile device industry, including smartphones and tablets, is one of the strongest emerging industries today with an estimated worth over 30 billion dollars and strong market growth trends. Software engineers for mobile devices are faced with new and different challenges than developers who develop traditional software systems. For example, since power consumption and memory usage are a scarce resource on mobile devices, large calculations are often performed on external ULSS - like the cloud computing infrastructure that Amazon, Google and Microsoft provide. Thus software development for mobile devices has its own set of interesting challenges. The changes to the development process required by mobile software systems have not yet been defined. In particular, the quality of the software developed for the mobile industry is of paramount importance to the millions of users who depend on them everyday. In this project we intend to study the different aspects of software quality with respect to mobile applications. The goal of this project is to determine the metrics that best describe the quality of the mobile applications. Then, we plan to interpret these metrics and use them to shed light on: 1) factors that impact the quality of mobile applications, and 2) changes to improve software quality. Our findings will provide valuable knowledge to mobile software development organizations such as BlackBerry, Microsoft, Google and Apple. The Software Analysis and Intelligence Lab (SAIL) is Canada's largest Software Engineering research lab with 16 - 20 researchers at any given time. Currently there are students and researchers from over 12 countries (Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, China, Egypt, Germany, India, Iran, Japan, Mexico, Pakistan, Russia, Taiwan, and the US). The researchers at SAIL have a diverse range of qualifications (Undergraduates, Masters, PhD, Post Doctoral Fellows, and Professors). Additionally we have hosted many international researchers who are experts in a wide range of computer science research areas. We have also hosted summer schools in the area of 'Mining Software Repositories'. We are always looking for top international talent to join our research lab. Researchers at SAIL are actively investigating approaches and creating techniques to support practitioners who are producing, maintaining and evolving large scale complex software systems. Our goal is to increase productivity for industry practitioners, improving predictability of effort investments. Early tools and techniques developed by members of SAIL are already integrated in products that are used by millions of users worldwide (see our publications). Our research and resulting tools have been adopted by industry and are used on a daily basis by practitioners in software development. Our close collaboration with industry directs us towards solving practical problems while using our academic experience to discover general scalable solutions that are validated through empirical industrial studies. Research at SAIL lies in the intersection of software engineering and systems. In particular, SAIL researchers work in many of the following areas: 1) mining software repositories (e.g., CVS) to derive actionable information from static usually-neglected software data, 2) software evolution and architecture to better understand and predict the growth of complex software systems, 3) performance and load testing to ensure that Quality of Service (QoS) requirements are met in a cost effective manner for infrastructures in large data centers, and 4) debugging and monitoring of distributed systems to help practitioners manage large complex infrastructures while respecting Service Levels Agreements (SLA). Dr.Hassan, Dr. Shang (Post Doctoral Fellow), and Mr.Syer (PhD Student) will work with the student at SAIL. The student will also have the opportunity to interact with the other researchers (16 - 20 at any given time) in the lab who have expertise in other areas of Software Engineering. The student will learn to perform a literature search through cataloging related research. They will attend research meetings and provide input along with other SAIL members, in order to come up with possible solutions to measure the quality of mobile software systems. The student will formalize the theory as hypotheses and then collect and analyze the data from existing mobile software systems in order to validate the various hypotheses. At the end of the project the student along with the other researchers will consolidate the results in an academic paper that will be submitted for publication. The student will learn the various steps of conducting a research project in the software engineering domain: 1. Literature search 2. Hypothesis building 3. Data collection, and 4. Hypothesis validation. They will build and apply software tools for extracting and analyzing data from various mobile open source projects. They will learn how to mine software repositories, such as source code and bug repositories, and how to build statistical models that help us better understand the information retrieved from these repositories. The student will also learn how to prepare weekly reports and monthly presentations for the research group. The skills learned are transferable and applicable to any software-related job the student may undertake in the future. Completion of the first two years in an undergraduate computer science, computer engineering or related discipline. The student should be able to program in at least one of the major programming languages like C/C++/C#/Java in order to implement early research prototypes. The student should display an interest in and a willingness to learn about how research is performed and disseminated. Industrial experience related to software development would be considered an asset. Knowledge of scripting languages like Perl or Python and statistical packages like R would also be considered an asset. 1 May, 2015 30 September, 2015 Queen's University – Kingston Ontario Ahmed Hassan 0 0 null English Software Evolution Dashboards Contemporary software development projects consist of hundreds of developers working together on a very large scale source code base, making many rapid changes to the source code at the same time. Trying to understand and monitor which parts of the code are being worked on by which developers is a constant challenge for both managers and developers. Currently, the lack of knowledge on the allocation of resources to source code increases the likelihood of faults, known as bugs, and decreases the quality of the software product. Recently, we at the Software Analysis and Intelligence Laboratory (SAIL – http://sail.cs.queensu.ca/) have proposed a solution to this problem that automatically monitors which parts of the source code are under revision as the source code evolves over time. Our solution automatically extracts statistics about different topics (e.g., database connection, menu click, save file, print file) in the source code, and determines how those topics are changing over time. Examples would be: the save file topic is under revisions by [some employee] or the print file topic has remained dormant for [time period]. Our vision is to incorporate this knowledge into software evolution dashboards, which can be used by project stakeholders to monitor the development effort in ultra-large scale software projects. Currently, we have developed our solution at a theoretical level and performed initial case studies and accuracy assessments. This work is published in international IEEE conferences [SCAM 2010, MSR 2011]. The Software Analysis and Intelligence Lab (SAIL) is Canada's largest Software Engineering research lab with 16 - 20 researchers at any given time. Currently there are students and researchers from over 12 countries (Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, China, Egypt, Germany, India, Iran, Japan, Mexico, Pakistan, Russia, Taiwan, and the US). The researchers at SAIL have a diverse range of qualifications (Undergraduates, Masters, PhD, Post Doctoral Fellows, and Professors). Additionally we have hosted many international researchers who are experts in a wide range of computer science research areas. We have also hosted summer schools in the area of 'Mining Software Repositories'. We are always looking for top international talent to join our research lab. Researchers at SAIL are actively investigating approaches and creating techniques to support practitioners who are producing, maintaining and evolving large scale complex software systems. Our goal is to increase productivity for industry practitioners, improving predictability of effort investments. Early tools and techniques developed by members of SAIL are already integrated in products that are used by millions of users worldwide (see our publications). Our research and resulting tools have been adopted by industry and are used on a daily basis by practitioners in software development. Our close collaboration with industry directs us towards solving practical problems while using our academic experience to discover general scalable solutions that are validated through empirical industrial studies. Research at SAIL lies in the intersection of software engineering and systems. In particular, SAIL researchers work in many of the following areas: 1) mining software repositories (e.g., CVS) to derive actionable information from static usually-neglected software data, 2) software evolution and architecture to better understand and predict the growth of complex software systems, 3) performance and load testing to ensure that Quality of Service (QoS) requirements are met in a cost effective manner for infrastructures in large data centers, and 4) debugging and monitoring of distributed systems to help practitioners manage large complex infrastructures while respecting Service Levels Agreements (SLA). The student will assist Dr.Hassan, Dr.Thomas (Post Doctoral Fellow), and Mr.Chen (PhD Student) in implementing the software evolution dashboard. The student will also have the opportunity to interact with the other researchers (16 - 20 at any given time) in the lab who have expertise in other areas of Software Engineering. Given the theory developed in our prior work and the extracted evolution data, the student will research and design a graphical user interface (GUI) that allows project stakeholders to effectively interact with the extracted data. The student will also have the opportunity to learn the various steps of conducting a research project in the software engineering domain: 1. Literature search 2. Hypothesis building 3. Data collection, and 4. Hypothesis validation. Additionally the student will assess third-party software libraries for actively displaying data like the Google Web Toolkit or the Jitsu web application toolkit. Using one of these libraries, the student will develop an interactive application to display the evolution data to a user, allowing the user click on certain parts of the data to view more detail. Interface design and source code implementation will be key aspects of this project. The student will also learn how to prepare weekly reports and monthly presentations for the research group. The skills learned are transferable and applicable to any software-related job the student may undertake in the future. Basic familiarity with programming in the standard imperative programming languages like Java, C/C++ and C# is required. In addition, knowledge of data and file manipulation in the Unix/Linux environment, of scripting languages (Python, Perl), of web development (HTML, JavaScript, CSS, XML, XQuery, jQuery), of data analysis and of visualization would all be considered assets. 1 May, 2015 30 September, 2015 Queen's University – Kingston Ontario Ahmed Hassan 0 0 null English Software Quality Models Much software engineering research is focused on the creation of models to predict effort requirements and defect probabilities. Such models are important means for practitioners to judge their current project situation, optimize the allocation of their resources, and make informed future decisions. However, software engineering data contains a large amount of variability and has high number of dimensions (many different metrics to measure the quality of software). Recent research demonstrates that such variability leads to poor fits of machine learning models to the underlying data. Recent results suggests' the splitting of datasets into more fine-grained subsets with similar properties (i.e. local models). In this project we intend to study how to build such local models. One question we hope to answer is: which clustering algorithms would be the best to split the dataset into smaller groups, such that the software quality models are more accurate in capturing and describing the behaviour of software? We will also experiment with non-linear statistical models and determine if they would be better at modelling software engineering data. The Software Analysis and Intelligence Lab (SAIL) is Canada's largest Software Engineering research lab with 16 - 20 researchers at any given time. Currently there are students and researchers from over 12 countries (Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, China, Egypt, Germany, India, Iran, Japan, Mexico, Pakistan, Russia, Taiwan, and the US). The researchers at SAIL have a diverse range of qualifications (Undergraduates, Masters, PhD, Post Doctoral Fellows, and Professors). Additionally we have hosted many international researchers who are experts in a wide range of computer science research areas. We have also hosted summer schools in the area of 'Mining Software Repositories'. We are always looking for top international talent to join our research lab. Researchers at SAIL are actively investigating approaches and creating techniques to support practitioners who are producing, maintaining and evolving large scale complex software systems. Our goal is to increase productivity for industry practitioners, improving predictability of effort investments. Early tools and techniques developed by members of SAIL are already integrated in products that are used by millions of users worldwide (see our publications). Our research and resulting tools have been adopted by industry and are used on a daily basis by practitioners in software development. Our close collaboration with industry directs us towards solving practical problems while using our academic experience to discover general scalable solutions that are validated through empirical industrial studies. Research at SAIL lies in the intersection of software engineering and systems. In particular, SAIL researchers work in many of the following areas: 1) mining software repositories (e.g., CVS) to derive actionable information from static usually-neglected software data, 2) software evolution and architecture to better understand and predict the growth of complex software systems, 3) performance and load testing to ensure that Quality of Service (QoS) requirements are met in a cost effective manner for infrastructures in large data centers, and 4) debugging and monitoring of distributed systems to help practitioners manage large complex infrastructures while respecting Service Levels Agreements (SLA). Dr.Hassan, Dr.Nagappan (Post Doctoral Fellow), and Mr.Sami (PhD Student) will work with the student at SAIL. The student will also have the opportunity to interact with the other researchers (16 - 20 at any given time) in the lab who have expertise in other areas of Software Engineering. The student will learn to perform a literature search through cataloging related research. They will attend research meetings and provide input along with other SAIL members, in order to come up with possible solutions to measure the quality of software systems. The student will formalize the theory as hypotheses and then collect and analyze the data from existing software systems in order to validate the various hypotheses. At the end of the project the student along with the other researchers will consolidate the results in an academic paper that will be submitted for publication. The student will learn the various steps of conducting a research project in the software engineering domain: 1. Literature search 2. Hypothesis building 3. Data collection, and 4. Hypothesis validation. They will build and apply software tools for extracting and analyzing data from various open source projects. They will learn how to mine software repositories, such as source code and bug repositories, and how to build statistical models that help us better understand the information retrieved from these repositories. The student will also learn how to prepare weekly reports and monthly presentations for the research group. The skills learned are transferable and applicable to any software-related job the student may undertake in the future. Completion of the first two years in an undergraduate computer science, computer engineering or related discipline. The student should be able to program in at least one of the major programming languages like C/C++/C#/Java in order to implement early research prototypes. The student should display an interest in and a willingness to learn about how research is performed and disseminated. Industrial experience related to software development would be considered an asset. Knowledge of scripting languages like Perl or Python and statistical packages like R would also be considered an asset. 1 May, 2015 30 September, 2015 Queen's University – Kingston Ontario Ahmed Hassan 0 0 null English Best Practices in Aboriginal Entrepreneurship This research project will explore best practices in Aboriginal Entrepreneurship including the teaching methodologies to be employed, business models and plans to be used as well as mentorship and knowledge transfer, all within an Aboriginal context. The research will be based on existing principles and methodologies used in training entrepreneurs and explore how these can be shaped into new ones which are more culturally sensitive and relevant in order to help facilitate best practices of teaching within Aboriginal communities. The research will look at existing traditional mentorship models such as the importance of Elders in the dissemination and transfer of knowledge. To meet this end, extensive research will be undertaken at the intersection of Aboriginal communities and entrepreneurial teaching methodologies with the eventual goal of developing culturally sensitive practices and tools for the Aboriginal communities to use in economic development for people in their community. Helping to develop an Aboriginal model to teach entrepreneurship will help to further the goal of economic self-reliance for Aboriginal people and aid in the development of a model which will benefit all Aboriginal peoples whilst exploring the best ways to engage students, teachers and mentors. Alongside suggestions and input from Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal business leaders, teachers and mentors, the expertise of Dr. Brent Mainprize will also be instrumental in helping to develop these goals. Dr. Mainprize’s experience working with aboriginal entrepreneurs makes him a knowledgeable and helpful guide. While carrying out new research comes with its own set of challenges, the availability of experts in the field of Aboriginal entrepreneurship will aid in overcoming many of the potential risks and challenges of this research. Instead of traditional functional majors, UVic Gustavson is a specialist program and offers BCom and MBA degrees with specializations in International Business, Entrepreneurship and Service Management. UVic Gustavson is recognized internationally for its Entrepreneurship education programs and research. Entrepreneurship at UVic has earned many prestigious awards including the 2000 USASBE (United States Association of Small Business and Entrepreneurship) Model Undergraduate Program Award, the 2001 Academy of Management Innovation in Entrepreneurship Pedagogy Award, and recognition as the top Canadian MBA Entrepreneurship program by Canadian Business Magazine (2001). From its inception, a universal co-op, the international experience, integrative business education and a strong connection to the business community have been the hallmarks of UVic’s Gustavson School of Business programs. UVic Gustavson is recognized internationally for its Entrepreneurship education programs and research. In the Spring of 2008 UVic created the Office of the National Aboriginal Economic Development Chair. Federal government, provincial government and industry funding have supported the Chair. Housed within the Gustavson School of Business and Faculty of Law, the mandate of the NAEDC includes important outreach to help train, educate, and support a new generation of Aboriginal business leaders. The Professor for this research project, Dr. Brent Mainprize, has written over 70 entrepreneurial business plans and Strategic Plans, evaluated over 700 plans and taught and coached over 1,000 entrepreneurs, executives and managers. Furthermore, Dr. Mainprize has been a consultant for TRICorp and various Aboriginal Communities on the North Coast since 1999. He has worked extensively on economy prosperity initiatives, entrepreneurship training, sustainable employment planning and strategies for the Nisga’a Lisims Government (post Treaty). Brent had the honour to serve on the Board of Directors of the Nisga’a Commercial Group (2006-2012). Over the past 14 years, Brent has had the privilege to facilitate various sessions on Aboriginal economic development and Aboriginal entrepreneurship in over 16 of the North Coast communities. The student will engage in research and comparison of the current business models, teaching methods and mentoring practices available in British Columbia. The innovative nature of this project naturally makes it potentially difficult. As there are little or no current methods in the Aboriginal context, traditional methods of dissemination of information will need to be explored and new methods will need to be proposed and developed. The student will engage with aboriginal business leaders and various community partners under the guidance of an academic supervisor and with the support of additional faculty members to understand what existing programs offer and how these can be altered within the Aboriginal context. The student for this research project should be pursuing a degree in business and skills and an understanding of the traditional methods of entrepreneurship, business plans and models. A familiarity with the region, culture and local market are beneficial but not necessary. Furthermore, he/she will possess good research and communication skills (written verbal). 1 May, 2015 30 September, 2015 University of Victoria – Victoria British Columbia Brent Mainprize 0 1 TRICORP English Non resident Indians and health investment in India: understanding global brain exchange and health care transformation. This research project consists of literature reviews, media analysis and case study analysis of Indian corporate health care interests to determine how significant internationalized expertise is to the current development of corporate health care in India. This includes management and clinical professional training, be it doctors, nurses and other health professionals. The current period of health care globalization demands we adopt a conceptual framework that recognizes global integration and interaction between health human resource (HHR) systems across different jurisdictions. Literature on HHR global migration has been conceptualised through various approaches, including push-pull, brain drain, global care chain, post-colonial, and more recently through what can be characterized as a global political economy (GPE) inspired approach. Using a GPE lens this research project will examine how national health education systems in India are increasingly responsive to and shaped by internationalized HHR labour markets. This research will document how training and labour market processes are globally integrated through private investment in health education, the growing importance of globally integrated marketized systems of health care delivery, and migration channels that provide circulatory labour flows exhibiting a global orientation. The role of public and private regulation in the area of health professional training will be examined in light of global migration circuits that reproduce tendencies toward markets and management in the health care sector. Using a global political economy approach to examine the tendencies toward corporate health and health training in India, the research will document the emergence of privatized training and health care systems and address the interconnections with global health professional migration circuits. Exploring the medical and nursing sector, as well as the growing medical tourism sector in India, the research will explore how state training regulations and controls have been amended in order to meet private sector interests. The extent to which private and public interests shape the regulatory contours of health professional education, as well as the continued corporatization of the health sector, and the links to the internationalization of health managers and professional expertise will be examined. This research will consist of literature reviews, news media analysis, and health corporation case studies to explore the integration of India’s HHR training into global health migration systems. These linkages will be identified through carious factors, including a. the degree of global orientation of health professional training, b. t he responsiveness of government regulators to facilitate private investment in the health training sector, and c. the ongoing globalization and marketization of the health care delivery and training sector. This research will develop a deeper assessment of the complex processes that currently reproduce the circulation of expertise within global HHR systems. Dr. Margaret Walton-Roberts is an associate professor in the Geography and Environmental studies department at Wilfrid Laurier University Ontario, and affiliated with the Balsillie School of International Affairs. She is currently associate director of the International Migration Research Centre at the Balsillie School. Her research addresses gender, Indian migration, immigrant settlement in Canada, and the impact of transnational networks in both source and destination locales. Her Indian related research can be grouped into the following areas: Her focus on gendered migration within transnational contexts includes examining the phenomena of India-Canada transnational marriages, immigrant settlement in smaller towns and cities, and skilled emigration of nurses from different regions in India. In terms of transnational networks she has published a number of articles highlighting the role of immigration and remittances in transnational community formation and maintenance including work on health philanthropy, remittance-led village projects in Punjab, explorations of the role of the state and community in the nature of transnational relations between Non Resident Indians and sending communities. Recent work following up on the transnational network theme examines the links between immigration and trade between Canada and India. Dr. Margaret Walton-Roberts, is widely published and has managed large research grants with international teams on diaspora and migration related themes. Over the past 6 years, as the inaugural Director and now Associate Director of the International Migration Research Centre (IMRC), she has organized conferences, raised funds, directed projects, published outputs, mentored, collaborated internationally, engaged in knowledge transfer with policy makers and community organizations, and established an international network of scholars affiliated to the IMRC. In addition to this work Dr. Walton-Roberts has also continued her research on South Asian migration and development, with a focus on gender and skilled migration, and maintained active supervision with students interested in South Asian immigrant settlement in Canada, global remittances, and the representation of diasporas. The student will work with the research lead and other members of the International Migration Research Centre based at the Balsillie School of International Affairs. We have a team of faculty and researchers working on a number of projects in the area of international migration and diasporas and development. The student will a) complete a literature review of relevant academic and policy documentation on the corporatization of health care in India with a focus on the role of international professional migration, Non-resident Indian investment in the heath sector, and the privatization of health educational institutions that train professionals for international migration opportunities. b) assessment of the role of health professional regulators and their global orientation in terms of training, curriculum development and regulatory testing. c) Analysis of literature related to medical tourism in India and the degree to which internationally experienced health professionals are incorporated into this growing sector. This work will rely on academic and government reports. d) Compile reports on individual corporate health groups in India to register the degree of international exposure evident in the experience of medical and management staff. Most of this work is desk based research with the goal of generating a report about knowledge gaps that need to be addressed through original research subsequent to the completion of this stage of research. Effective research and literature synthesis skills, web based research skills, good writing and software skills (especially experience with qualitative data management systems such as Nvivo, or a willingness to learn). This is mostly desk based research that will require the formulation of inventories of literature on health care corporation in India and their international connections. It will also demand policy analysis of health professional regulators in India, so some familiarity with recent policy changes in this area, and the relevant state and central government ministries active in health professional training and regulation will be an asset. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 Wilfrid Laurier University – Kitchener Ontario Margaret Walton-Roberts 0 0 null English Microfluidic Bioreactors Regenerative medicine or cell therapy is a therapeutic strategy where the damaged cells in an organ are replaced by new cells that have been grown externally. Usually, cells from the patients are taken, transformed genetically, cultured and enlarged to obtain adequate cell densities and then reinjected back into the patient as a treatment. Therefore, these types of cell therapy needs small batch sizes and custom processing that are specific to the particular cell type and patient necessitating the need for modular and automated processing. The technology developed should be of disposable single use nature so that cross contamination between batches is reduced. It also should enable easy, automated and closed fluid transfer between various unit operations so that contamination is minimized. This closed system will also allow multiple batches to be cultured inside the same clean room facility that is not possible currently and enable increase in throughput. It should also be continuously monitored for quality control purposes. The biological products are sensitive to minor variations in culture environment and these should be controlled and monitored. Finally, the new methods need to be developed for measurement of “drug potency” for quality control purposes. These developments are essential in the next 3-5 years in order to translate the emerging cell based therapies in research labs and pharmaceutical companies into bioproducts that could be delivered to patients for treatment. In this research project we will focus on the development of devices and technologies of various unit operations associated with cell production and suited for automation. The different unit operations that are essential are 1) Collection and isolation; 2) Culture and expansion; 3) Manipulations of cells; and 4) Harvesting, washing, filtering and concentrating; Here we focus on developing novel bioreactor technologies that will be suitable for growing the cells in a controlled fashion. A major element in the project will be the design of various bioreactor configurations from semi batch to continuous flow systems that will enable automated handling of functions like addition of reagents, maintaining concentration of cells, removal of waste and addition of nutrients. Distributed mini bioreactors will be fabricated where the cells can be seeded automatically at a uniform density and allowed to grow either in an adherent fashion or in suspension. Filters attached to each of the microreactors will allow retention of the cells while enabling washing of the cells and replacement of the growth medium on a periodic basis. Special microchannels embedded into the structure will provide nutrients gases and also maintain temperature. Additional focus will be on the development of microfabrication technologies that will enable the realization of the distributed reactors. Laser micromachining techniques along with additive manufacturing and 3D printing technologies will be explored which will enable low-cost, customized fabrication of these bioreactors to meet the patient needs. My research interests, broadly, are in the design, fabrication and development of microdevices for application in biology, medicine. In addition, I have an interest in application of microfluidics to thermal management. Specifically, I am interested in use of microfabrication techniques - conventionally used in microelectronic industry – in parallel fabrication of precise and low cost microfluidic devices that could perform chemical and biological unit operations. At a more fundamental level, I am interested in the understanding and the use of electrically driven flows for transport and control in these devices as these are the dominant effects in the microscale. urrently, my research focuses on developing microfluidic devices for application in drug discovery, medical/environmental diagnosis and drug delivery. In addition, we are active in developing solutions for thermal management of electronics using microfluidics. Our group has developed microfabrication procedures and process flows for incorporating novel materials such as paraffin, porous polymer monoliths, thermal sensitive phase change polymers, and biocompatible polyurethane in microfluidic devices. We have then used the unique properties of these materials in design and development of microfluidic components such as micropumps, microvalves, detectors and light sources. For example, we have developed the smallest electrokinetic micropumps using porous polymer monolith, thermopneumatic microvalves using paraffin and pNIPPAM (poly N-isopropyl acrylamide), first microfluidic light source and detectors using microplasmas and the highest pressure generating electrohydrodynamic pumps for electronic cooling application. Combining some of these components, we have also developed integrated microsystems that use these functional components with applications in medical diagnostics, drug discovery, drug delivery and electronic cooling. Some of our key accomplishments using these devices include development of the first microfluidic high throughput microinjection system for embryos, discovery of highly repeatable electrotaxis of C.elegans in microfluidic channels and demonstration of control, transport and sorting of C.elegans. One of the student will play a crucial role in the design and development of the bioreactors. The second student will be invovled in the development of the manufacturing process to make the bioreactors. Background in Mechanical or Chemical Engineering is required. Students who have taken courses in fluid mechanics and Heat transfer would be useful. 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 McMaster University – Hamilton Ontario Ravi Selvaganapathy 0 0 null English Magnetometry with spin-based sensors The summer intern will participate in a project aimed at using single defect centers in diamond to map out the magnetic fields generated by driven ferromagnetic circuits. Nanoscale magnetic circuits are critically important to computer hardware, especially in applications that use ferromagnetic domains to encode information. For example, magnetic random access memory (MRAM) could potentially replace standard DRAM while drastically reducing the demands for power. Understanding the dynamics of driven ferromagnetic circuits thus has important applications both in fundamental science and in industry. One challenge is to understand the role of spatial inhomogeneities, and one would thus seek to map out the magnetization of the device on the nanoscale – and ideally also watch its time evolution. However, there are few techniques that can measure magnetic fields with good sensitivity and excellent spatial and temporal (or, alternately, spectral) resolution. One possibility is to fabricate the ferromagnetic circuit on the surface of a substrate embedded with tiny magnetic sensors. In particular, the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect center in diamond can be used to sense magnetic fields because its spin (which responds to magnetic fields) can be detected via the fluorescence intensity of the defect. Each defect can thereby reveal the magnetic field at its location, with the potential for nanoscale spatial resolution. Moreover, by manipulating the defect, one can select the time at which it senses the magnetic field or (more commonly) the frequency of magnetic fields that affect it. The central goal of this project is thus to use a diamond substrate embedded with NV centers to map out the driven dynamics of a ferromagnetic circuit fabricated on the diamond surface. This project is in its initial stages, and the first goal for the project will be to observe resonant features in the circuit dynamics by correlating transport measurements (e.g. the resistance of the circuit as a function of the frequency of the AC current that drives it) with measurements of NV defects. Currently, we have begun implantation of defects into diamond substrates, and will begin fabrication of simple magnetic circuits this fall. Next summer, the first devices will likely be functional. The intern will help to push this project forward by developing a specific aspect of the apparatus or data analysis. My research group is currently studying optically active defects in crystalline hosts for applications in quantum information science and metrology. Such defect centers provide a unique opportunity to study highly coherent quantum optical systems in a robust solid-state device. In particular, the spin degrees of freedom associated with certain types of defects can behave quantum mechanically over timescales approaching seconds, even at room temperature. Moreover, their atomic-like optical transitions provide a mechanism to encode and detect information stored in individual spin-based quantum bits, creating a platform for quantum information processing devices or precision sensors. My research group is pursuing two initial directions applying quantum optical techniques to defects in diamond. One important goal is the integration of single defects into high quality factor, low mode volume microresonators. Using a fiber-based design compatible with ultra-high finesse mirror coatings, we seek to create a cavity quantum electrodynamics system capable of attaining the strict strong-coupling regime. Moreover, the open cavity geometry will allow integration of hybrid optomechanical-spin systems, allowing exploration of novel spin-phonon coupling or defect-mediated interactions between photons and mechanics. In the long term, integration of NV centers into microfabricated photonic devices could play a key role in developing building blocks for a quantum repeater or creating novel sensors. The second direction pursued in our group will investigate far-field subwavelength imaging of defects for applications in quantum information science and metrology. By taking advantage of the nanometric resolution attainable with stimulated emission-depletion microscopy, our research will probe the possibility to observe the quantum state of a network of interacting spins. At the same time, nanometric resolution has implications for mapping out magnetic fields using closely-spaced defects embedded in a device substrate as sensors. Currently in the building phase, these experiments aim to reveal the nanoscale spatial inhomogeneity of dynamics in driven ferromagnetic circuits. Within the larger project, the intern will take on a specific sub-project or sub-projects. For example, our current method for detecting the spin state of the NV defect (and thereby the magnetic field) involves counting the number of photons emitted by the NV during a specific time interval. One spin state initially fluoresces more than the other, but the difference dies off in a microsecond or so, so we only count for the first few hundred nanoseconds, and use that total number of photons as our data. However, this is clearly not the optimal strategy – photons that arrive during the time of peak signal should count more, and those that arrive toward the tail should count less. Using maximum likelihood estimation, it should be possible to determine an optimal measurement strategy to get the highest signal-to-noise in our magnetic field sensor. Such a sub-project would involve precisely measuring the transient optical signal as a function of excitation intensity, fitting these signals to a rate equation model, determining the optimal strategy (including excitation power as well as data analysis) for estimating the spin state given a set of measured photon arrival times. A motivated student could possibly also coming up with a nearly-optimal and more computationally efficient strategy based on a nonlinear filter and implement it using an FPGA card for real-time data acquisition. Another potential subproject would be the design and construction of an adaptation to our microscope to enable imaging through the diamond substrate. This will allow us to examine fields directly underneath the lithographically fabricated circuit, but will require significant modifications to our apparatus, which can currently only image defects from above. Design work would involve understanding optical aberrations induced by the diamond and how to correct them, consideration of mechanical requirements for optical and electronic access to the sample through our nanopositioning stage, and use of nonmagnetic materials throughout. The components would be modeled with CAD (computer-aided design) software, and machined. The design would then be integrated into the existing optics and electronics of the apparatus. Yet another possibility for subprojects would be to perform micromagnetic simulations of magnetic dynamics using for example OOMMF (object oriented micro-magnetic framework) to compare with measured data. The precise nature and details of the subproject can be adapted to suit the expertise and interests of the intern, as well as the needs of the overall project a year from now. Regardless, the intern will gain experience with optics – in particular confocal microscopy used to resolve single defects – electronics (including microwave/RF techniques used to drive spin resonance), computerized data acquisition and analysis, as well as a background in magnetometry with spin-based sensors. Throughout the project, the intern will have regular meetings with Prof. Childress (at least 1x per week) and also participate in weekly group meetings and journal article discussions. The primary requirements for this project are a background in undergraduate quantum mechanics and laboratory experience (e.g. at the level of an advanced undergraduate lab course). The intern will need to understand basic electronics well enough that with some instruction he or she will be able to safely and competently operate microwave signal generators and amplifiers, as well as standard test and measurement equipment (e.g. oscilloscopes). A course in optics is not strictly required, but it would be helpful. In addition, some exposure to computer programming, computerized data acquisition, or computer-aided design would be extremely helpful, as would familiarity with probability/statistics. 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 McGill University – Montréal Québec Lilian Childress 0 0 null English Cognitive Wireless System for Aerospace Wireless intra-aircraft communication is considered to replace various wired connections. Wireless systems promise multitude of advantages such as low weight, ease of maintenance, modularity, expandability, and low cost. Currently, wireless systems have been evaluated for flight test instrumentation (FTI), structural health monitoring (SHM), and in-flight-entertainment (IFE), and cabin management system (CMS). Despite the common belief, an intelligent or cognitive wireless system can be designed to completely avoid interference with aircraft electronics and other wireless systems. It can also be made very reliable on par with wired systems. A wireless CMS could bring a number of advantages. It can sense various parameters and enable adaptive control and reconfiguration. For example wireless sensor nodes can sense carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, atmospheric pressure, temperature, humidity, lighting and sound intensity in cabins enabling various adaptive feedback schemes. A critical problem for the realization of wireless intra-aircraft systems is the availability of suitable frequency band and interference avoidance. Commercial aircraft are intended to be used all over the globe and the frequency band should meet world-wide regulations. Currently, such frequency regulation is remained an unsolved issue. The wireless avionics intra-communications (WAIC) initiative has prepared an agenda item for the World Radio Conference (WRC) of 2015 to ask for such spectrum allocation and national ratifications. This effort may require a change to the International Table of frequency allocations and can take around ten years or more, according to one prediction. The new spectrum allocation policy, however, can soon be obsolete due to the rapid pace of wireless technology advancements. An alternative approach to the above issue is to use the unlicensed spectrum bands, such as 2.4 GHz or 5 GHz. However, systems that operate in a shared frequency band are prone to interfere with other services that share the same band and the aircraft electronic equipment. For wireless CMS, interferences can occur due to Wi-Fi or Bluetooth connections by laptops, mobile phones or wireless headphones. Hence, advanced communication algorithms, such as cognitive radio (CR) or software defined radio (SDR), could be used to increase system robustness in the likely case of interference. The CR approach can learn the environment (including surrounding aircraft electronic equipment) and use only the safe frequency at the safe power level. It can also detect the critical flight take-off and landing times and adaptively control its transmission to avoid harmful effects. The wireless sensor nodes can operate as stand-alone units or as a part of a collaborative sensor network creating a more complete picture of the cabin environment. Currently, Federal Aviation Administration has funded a study to help identify the typical conditions within aircraft cabin at Boise State University. I have been working in signal processing for wireless communications. My special interest is wireless communications in special areas such as tunnels, mines, hospitals and air crafts. Each of this area presents a unique challenge. I have been working on signal processing for interference avoidance and reliable communications over unreliable channels. In the past I have had a MITACS Accelerate projects with Honeywell Aerospace and Hydro One Inc. Bio: Xavier N. Fernando (http://www.ee.ryerson.ca/~fernando) is a Professor Director of Ryerson Communications Lab at Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada. He has PhD from the University of Calgary and TRLabs, Alberta. He has co-authored close to 100 research articles and holds two patents. He is the Chair of the IEEE Toronto Section and an IEEE Communications Society Distinguished Lecturer. He is a member in the IEEE COMSOC Education Board Working Group on Wireless Communications. He has delivered invited talks worldwide including the Cambridge University (UK), MIT and Princeton University (USA). He is a co-author and co-editor of the IEEE Communications Society Wireless Communication Body of Knowledge (WEBOK). He was a visiting scholar at the Institute of Advanced Telecommunications (IAT), UK in 2008. He has worked for ATT for three years as an RD Engineer. He is a program evaluator for ABET. His work has won several awards and prizes including IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society Prize in 2010, Sarnoff Symposium prize in 2009, Opto-Canada best poster prize in 2003 and CCECE best paper prize in 2001. He is very active professionally and won IEEE COMSOC Chapter Achievement Award for 2008 and IEEE Toronto Section exemplary service award in 2007. He is the General Chair of the IEEE Canadian Conference on Electrical and Computer Engineering 2014. He has obtained funding from Finnish International Development Agency (FINNIDA), Alberta Informatics Circle of Research Excellence (ICORE), Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada, Canadian Foundation of Innovations (CFI), Ontario Innovations Trust Fund (OIT), MITACS, and Canadian Photonic Fabrication Research (CPFR). The student, with other students of Ryerson Communications Lab, will read literature to understand basics, then develop solutions analytically and verify by simulation. The progress will be tracked by establishing periodic reports. A final report on the findings will be prepared after the work is completed. It is hoped that at least short publications will result from this work. The hired RA should: 1. Read and familiarize with the fundamentals of wireless and what has already been done in this project. Collect reading material from the library or on-line and to refer them as needed 2. Develop MATLAB and SIMULINK models for in-aircraft wireless communication system and interference sources; multiuser and multipath conditions. Develop signal processing algorithms for interference cancellation and verify them by simulation. 3. Regularly (minimum weekly) meet the supervisor to discuss the progress, difficulties and directions 4. Document the research progress and to submit a short report on the project outcome 5. Finally make an oral presentation explaining what is written 6. Future recommendation to the students by the supervisor will be based on the weekly meeting, report and oral presentations. The student should be a bright electrical engineering student from a reputed university. Good knowledge in electronics and communications is required. Especially should be comfortable with in Fourier Transform, spectral domain considerations. Knowledge on in-band and out of band interference is an asset. The student should be well versed with MATLAB and SIMULINK software etc. The student should have known various undergraduate level signal processing algorithms. Knowledge in wavelet transforms is desirable. Good writing and presentation skills English language and ability to make a good oral presentation using audio visual aids is also needed. 1 May, 2015 1 July, 2015 Ryerson University – Toronto Ontario Xavier Fernando 0 0 null English Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks Using metaheuritics algorithms Due to advances in low-power wireless communications, low-power analog and digital electronics, the development of low-cost and low-power sensor nodes that are small in size has received increasing attention. Sensor nodes have the ability to sense the environment nearby, perform simple computations and communicate in a small region. Although their capacities are limited, combining these small sensors in large numbers provides a new technological platform, called Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). WSNs provide reliable operations in various application areas including environmental monitoring, health monitoring, vehicle tracking system, military surveillance and earthquake observation Wireless Sensor Networks consisting of nodes with limited power are deployed to gather useful information from the field. In WSNs it is critical to collect the information in an energy efficient manner. In this project, we will present a new protocol for WSN routing operations. The protocol is achieved by using metaheuritics algorithms (such as Ant Colony Optimization algorithm, Hybrid Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm, and Hybrid Simulated Annealing Algorithms ) based optimization technique in network routing to optimize routing paths, providing an effective multi-path data transmission method to achieve reliable communications in the case of node faults. We will aim to maintain network life time at a maximum, while data transmission is achieved efficiently, so an adaptive approach is developed according to this goal. The proposed approaches are compared to a well known other algorithms such as ant based algorithm named EEABR using an event-based simulator. Our goal is to offer significant reductions of energy consumption which is used as a performance metric for different sized WSNs. Also, we will implement our approach on a small sized hardware component requiring minimum connections suitable for tiny node designs and we will develop an methods for handling the routing tasks by using the proposed approaches router chip. We will test our alhorithms running on the router chip and obtain their performance results, including response times of the chip. Response time of the header request for the routing operation would be satisfactory for many WSNs where transmission speed is not essential. The proposed approaches for WSN routings and its hardware implementation seem to be a very good potential/ promising solution for node designers. WSN settings, including nodes having high mobility. Professor M. A. Tawhid Mohamed A. Tawhid got his PhD in Applied Mathematics from the University of Maryland Baltimore County, Maryland, USA. From 2000 to 2002, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Faculty of Management, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Currently, he is a full professor at Thompson Rivers University. His research interests include nonlinear/stochastic/heuristic optimization, operations research, modelling and simulation, data analysis, and wireless sensor network. He has published in journals such as Computational Optimization and Applications, J. Optimization and Engineering, Journal of Optimization Theory and Applications, European Journal of Operational Research, Journal of Industrial and Management Optimization, Journal Applied Mathematics and Computation, etc. Mohamed Tawhid published more than 40 referred papers and edited 4 special issues in J. Optimization and Engineering (Springer), J. Abstract and Applied Analysis, J. Advanced Modeling and Optimization, and International Journal of Distributed Sensor Networks. Also, he has served on editorial board several journals. In last two years, he has started consulting with industry for which he received two NSERC Engage grants. These new projects are significant in many aspects. First, it demonstrates knowledge transfer from the university to industry. The projects also provide an internship for an M.Sc. student, research associates and Post-doc researchers, demonstrating the training of highly qualified personnel. The 1st project was related to social network analytics in which we used statistical tools to answer the following questions: When are people most likely to comment or like a post on a wall in Facebook? When are people most likely to retweet content? Is there a language pattern between content receiving more tweets, likes or comments? Which region is more likely to leave comments? The 2nd project was related to portfolio management investment system. This project will develop static single period and dynamic multi-period portfolio selection models and computer implement and test them with simulated data and live investment data. Student is expected to know some skills of programming like MatLab and Metaheurtics algorithms (is able to learn it quickly if s/he does not know). Student will write many computer programs by using matlab software or Javaa and he will apply Ant Colony Optimization algorithm, Hybrid Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm, and Hybrid Simulated Annealing to routing in wireless sensor networks. He will compare these algorithms with other algorithms. Also, student will help in writing a report and graph as a research assistant. Writing computer programming (Matlab software or others); Metaheurtics algorithms Writing report 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 Thompson Rivers University – Kamploops British Columbia Mohamed Tawhid 0 0 null English Non Marketing-based Drivers of Marketing Spending: Impact on Stock Market Performance When asked in a CNBC interview about her most important initiatives, Meg Whitman, on her first day as CEO of Hewlett Packard (HP), responded unequivocally, “First priority is to make the revenue and EPS (earnings per share) targets.” Also, a recent Wall Street Journal article indicated “Mr. Hurd (Whitman’s predecessor) steadily increased HP's profits—but he did so partly by cutting spending on programs that could have set the company up for future growth.” Among several expenses cut, marketing expenses were reduced to meet the EPS target (Bloomberg 08/18/2009). As is shown in the HP example, financial analysts play an important role by acquiring value-relevant information, analyzing the information for the benefit of their existing and potential investors and employees, and establishing expectations on firm performances. On the one hand, agency theorists traditionally interpret performance expectations set by financial analysts as efficient mechanisms for shareholder monitoring of firms’ strategic decisions. On the other hand, dissenting work expresses concerns about likely effects of analysts’ earnings expectations on firms’ strategic decisions (Jensen 2005; Stein 1989) because many firms cut spending on strategic commitments such as advertising and RD and avoid initiating other positive net present value projects if it meant falling short of publically known earnings targets. In this context, the research aims to investigate (1) whether marketing managers tend to manipulate their advertising spending decisions, which could have been essential for future growth, under financial pressures, and (2) more importantly, whether firms, which remained committed in the past to advertising spending even under analysts’ pressures, are rewarded or punished by the stock market in the short- and long-term. Understanding the interplay among earnings targets, advertising spending, and stock market reactions is important to clearly establish the strategic and financial value of advertising and, in addition, this is an important step towards marketing attaining “accountability” (Lehmann 2004), and “regaining stature in the firm” (Verhoef and Leeflang 2009) or “regaining a seat at the table” (Reibstein, Day, and Wind 2009). Dr. Lim is mainly interested in promotion effects on firm performances. Substantial academic literature has established the short-term and long-term sales and stock market responses to sales promotions and advertising. In pursuit of this area, Dr. Lim's research has accordingly centered on measuring promotional effects, while incorporating heterogeneity in estimating the dynamic effects of promotions using time series models. Heterogeneity, which is the basis of the segmentation, targeting, and positioning strategies in marketing, has been considered one of the most critical and challenging characteristics to be modeled in marketing. The existing literature has addressed either the short-term and static promotional effects with the consideration of consumer heterogeneity, or the long-term and dynamic promotional effects without considering consumer heterogeneity. Recognizing that not allowing for heterogeneity in time series models could lead to biased results due to aggregation fallacies, Dr. Lim sets out in his research to accommodate the consumer and store heterogeneity by modelling the dynamic promotion effects over a long time horizon. Recognizing the substantial carry-over effect of advertising, which is quite different from a short-term price promotion effect, Dr. Lim has also become interested in the application of dynamic time series models to examine the long-term advertising effects in both the financial markets and product markets. The fundamental idea of this research stream is that the spending on advertising will build stronger brand equity in the product market, which will eventually affect the financial performances captured by firm value, cost of capital, and cost of debt. One of the research projects related to this topic was to examine the interaction between managers’ short- and long-term compensation structure, advertising spending as a result of the compensation structure, and their impacts on the firm value in the financial markets. In addition, Dr. Lim is also interested in the movie/entertainment industry. Several research projects are currently being conducted related to the DVD market and product placement. Participation in this research project will provide students with one-to-one training for conducting research, from idea generation and conceptualization to collecting and analyzing data, and to the writing and review processes. This involvement in the entire procedure will provide them with valuable opportunities to hone their research skills and capabilities. Specifically, students will conduct literature review related to the topic, and conduct econometric analysis to analyze associated data. In terms of data processing, students will examine multiple large-scale databases, such as Institutional Brokers Earning System (I/B/E/S), COMPUSTAT, and CRSP and estimate cutting-edge empirical time-series and panel econometric models under the supervision of the professor. These basic skills will enable them to conduct their own research projects, such as thesis projects, irrespective of the topic or area, in the future. Required: Excel Plus: SAS, SPSS, Visual Basic, Stata, R 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 Concordia University – Montréal Québec Jooseop Lim 0 0 null French Caractérisation d'une signature de miARNs modulés par le froid La mouche Eurosta solidaginis est régulièrement utilisée par la communauté scientifique pour étudier le phénomène de tolérance au froid. Des expériences préliminaires par séquençage de nouvelle génération (Next Gen Sequencing) sur des larves d'E. solidaginis contrôles et gelées ont permis d'identifier une signature préliminaire de miARNs modulés par le froid. Les expériences du présent projet consistent en la (1) Confirmation des résultats obtenus par séquençage de nouvelle génération via la méthode de Réaction en Chaîne par Polymérase (PCR), et en (2) l'Analyse de l’activité de la cascade de biogénèse des miARNs à basses températures via la mesure des niveaux protéiques de la protéine Dicer, une enzyme charnière à cette cascade, par la technique de Western blot. Une approche par qRT-PCR sera donc préconisée pour effectuer la validation de trois à quatre miARNs qui auront démontré de grandes variations par séquençage. L’isolation de miARNs avec la trousse d’isolation mirVana ainsi que les étapes utilisées dans l’approche par PCR seront effectuées comme précédemment (Morin et al., 2008). Le premier objectif de ce programme de recherche consiste en la caractérisation des mécanismes de régulation impliqués dans la tolérance au froid chez les insectes. La survie aux basses températures nécessite un contrôle serré des cascades de signalisation cellulaire et ce programme vise à mieux comprendre le réseau d'interactions moléculaires nécessaire pour la survie au froid chez l'Eurosta solidaginis. Bien que l'activité métabolique est significativement réduite à des températures sous le point de congélation, ce modèle d'insecte est tout de même capable de palier à ce stress en réduisant les procédés à forte consommation énergétique et en activant des cascades signalétiques requises pour sa survie. Alors que la recherche dans ce domaine a identifié plusieurs cascades de signalisation cellulaire et enzymes solicitées au froid, bien peu d'information est disponible en ce qui concerne une famille de petits acides ribonucléiques non-codants appelés microARNs (miARNs). L'identification d'une signature de miARNs différentiellement exprimés au froid et la caractérisation des mécanismes impliqués dans la biogénèse et la dégradation des miARNs chez les insectes qui tolèrent le froid constituent les objectifs principaux de notre programme de recherche. Alors que ce programme offre une bonne opportunité d'augmenter notre connaissance des bases biochimiques associées à la tolérance au froid chez les insectes, les données recueillies trouvent également des applications dans le domaine médical. Comprendre comment les insectes survivent à ces conditions se rattache au domaine de la cryobiologie et les résultats obtenus sur ces modèles génèrent des indices importants pour l'élaboration d'une stratégie visant à protéger les cellules contre le dommage causé par le froid lors du processus de cryopréservation. À long terme, la caractérisation des cascades de signalisation solicitées chez les insectes qui tolèrent le froid mène à l'élucidation des mécanismes moléculaires clés associés à la survie sous cette condition et alimente les efforts déployés pour améliorer le processus de préservation d'organes. En collaboration étroite avec un étudiant gradué, l'étudiante ou l'étudiant devra se familiariser avec la littérature et les techniques de base en lien avec le domaine de recherche présenté plus haut (tolérance au froid, hibernation et miARNs). Elle ou il devra par la suite mesurer par qRT-PCR des niveaux de miARNs sélectionnés dans divers échantillons d'insectes qui tolèrent le froid. En parallèle, la mesure des niveaux protéiques de cibles sélectionnées sera également entreprise via la technique de Western blot. Des connaissances théoriques de base en biologie, biochimie et chimie sont exigées. Des connaissances pratiques (i.e. en laboratoire) dans ces mêmes domaines sont souhaitables (techniques de RT-PCR, Western blot, culture cellulaire, isolation d'ARN). Notre laboratoire accueille fréquemment des étudiantes et étudiants de divers niveaux et une formation technique sera offerte au candidat dès son insertion à notre équipe de recherche. 11 mai, 2015 31 juillet, 2015 Université de Moncton – Campus de Moncton New Brunswick Pier Jr Morin 0 0 null English Cellular physiology of iron in inflammation and infection processes: novel Fe chelator responses in experimental model systems Uveitis refers to the inflammation of the uvea, the middle vascular coat of the eye, and is one of the leading causes of blindness in the world with a prevalence of 38-714 per 100,000 people. The most common symptoms caused by uveitis are decreased vision, eye pain, redness and light sensitivity. Uveitis can occur at any age however it most commonly affects adults between the ages of 20 and 59 during the most productive years of life. As such, the burden of visual impairment is very significant to affected individuals. Inflammation is associated with elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which leads to oxidative stress induced damage. During inflammation cytokines and chemokines induce intracellular ROS production which leads to the activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors such as NF-ĸB and AP-1. Activation of these transcription factors leads to the upregulation of inflammatory cytokines and other messenger molecules which further increase the production of ROS. Elevated ROS levels in turn activate pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 which play a role in cellular apoptosis and tissue damage. Intracellular iron has been shown to play a role in both acute and chronic inflammation. Iron is a core requirement for the catalysis of oxygen reactive species from O2 and H2O2 by polymorphonucler leukocytes through the Fenton reaction. The production of oxygen reactive species is vital for combating invading pathogens however, if left unchecked can lead to tissue damage and toxic effects. Furthermore, in addition to causing tissue damage iron catalyzed production of superoxide anion radicles plays a role in promoting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and monocyte recruitment which further amplifies the inflammatory response. In this study we propose to assess the effects of iron chelators, molecules which bind to and sequester iron, on ocular inflammation and tissue damage in an experimental model of non-infectious uveitis. Specifically, we will be investigating the effects of two iron chelating compounds, DIBI and MAHMP, which were developed by Chelation Partners Inc. on leukocyte adhesion, ocular tissue damage and ocular inflammatory cytokine levels in a systemic model of non-infectious uveitis. Given the role iron plays in inflammation and leukocyte recruitment, we believe that by decreasing the levels of iron available to catalyze oxygen free radical production, we can decrease tissue damage and tissue monocyte recruitment in states of inflammation. Dr. Christian Lehmann is a Professor of Anesthesia and holds cross-appointments in the departments of Pharmacology and Microbiology Immunology at Dalhousie University. He is also a staff Anesthesiologist at the QEII Health Sciences Centre. Dr. Lehmann’s clinical training in the related disciplines of anesthesia, intensive care medicine, emergency medicine and pain therapy factor heavily in his main research focus on sepsis and, more specifically, early indicators of sepsis. His work in this area has been funded by grants from the Canada Foundation for Innovation, Nova Scotia Research Innovation Trust, Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation, Dalhousie Medical Research Foundation and the Capital Health Research Fund. Prior to joining Dalhousie University in 2007, Dr. Lehmann held a number of clinical, academic and administrative positions at Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Greifswald and Humboldt University in Germany. He is the founding member of the European Intestinal Transplantation Study Group and is a member of many professional associations including the International Anesthesia Research Society, the German Sepsis Society, and the European Society for Microcirculation. More than 50 per cent of people who develop severe sepsis die from the condition. Severe sepsis occurs when immune response to an infection goes into overdrive, triggering widespread inflammation and microscopic clots in blood vessels throughout the body. Consequently the body begins to shut down and vital organs fail. People in hospital and/or people who have undergone surgery are at increased risk of developing sepsis, which stems from an infection somewhere in the body. Through his research, Dr. Christian Lehmann seeks to identify early signs of sepsis and to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. He is an anesthesiologist with specialized training in critical care who, in his clinical work, has seen the devastating effects of sepsis. In preclinical studies, Dr. Lehmann and his team use intravital microscopy to visualize and examine the microcirculatory system, vessels of the blood and lymphatic system. The student will be directly involved in the research project and will be assisting a post-doctoral fellow. The student will help with all experimental procedures and data analysis. By the end of the internship the student will have had an opportunity to practice animal handling (mice), intravital microscopy, tail-vein injections, data analysis (leukocyte recruitment data), histology and other general laboratory skills such as solution preparation. The student will be responsible for showing up on time and assisting with the experiment set up, the experiment and the cleanup. The student will be expected to become comfortable with conducting a literature review and to learn the background and current information about the research project. Additionally, during the internship the student will be expected to attend lab meetings and to participate in journal club. The student is required to have a basic understanding of the biological sciences with a specific emphasis on microbiology and immunology. Previous laboratory experience with animal work (specifically mice), intravital microscopy, tail-vein injections, data analysis (leukocyte recruitment data), histology and other general laboratory skills such as solution preparation and handling are an asset but are not required. Most of the skills required will be taught during the internship. 1 June, 2015 31 August, 2015 Dalhousie University – Halifax Nova Scotia Christian Lehmann 1 1 Chelation Partners Inc. English Effects of loss of FMRP in the hippocampus on adult hippocampal neurogenesis The aim of our work is to show that FMRP (Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein) is involved in the development of new neurons and neuronal connections. FMRP is widely expressed in the developing brain , with the hippocampus being one of the major sites for FMRP expression in the fetal brain. Our own work has shown that loss of FMRP disrupts synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis, and NMDAr function. More recently it has been shown that ablation of FMRP specifically in neural stem cells in the adult brain disrupts hippocampal neurogenesis and impairs learning. In addition, our preliminary data indicate that FMRP expression is highest in the subgranular region where adult neurogenesis occurs. Together these data lead us to hypothesize that FMRP is critical for establishing the excitatory activity that is essential for adult neurogenesis to occur optimally. We will be looking at whether FMRP changes rates of neuronal proliferation/differentiation/cell survival. Immunohistochemistry will be used to dual label cells for bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and neuronal (neuronal nuclei, NeuN) or glia (glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP) phenotypic markers. To provide convergent evidence for any changes in cell proliferation and neurogenesis, we will also perform these experiments using intrinsic markers for mitotic activity. These will include the cell cycle proteins Ki-67, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA. We will also measure NeuroD, a transcription factor that is expressed in neuronal stem cells and immature neurons; and doublecortin, DCX, a cytoskeletal protein that is expressed in immature neurons to determine how many new cells become neurons. My research investigates how developmental disorders, and other pathological conditions, affect the structure and function of the hippocampal formation, a part of the brain known to be involved in learning and memory processes. I am particularly interested in how the continual introduction of new neurons into the adult brain can promote enhanced learning and memory. My work employs several animal models of developmental disorders, including Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, Fragile-X Syndrome and Rett Syndrome. We hypothesize that these disorders affect a common set of structural and functional features in the hippocampus, and that their effects are functionally similar to those observed in Alzheimer's disease and the senescent brain. In short, all of these disorders involve some degree of altered neurogenesis and synaptic function. I believe that carefully examining what is altered in the hippocampus by each disorder will contribute to a basic understanding of how learning and memory processes occur in the brain. In my laboratory, we use a number of sophisticated research techniques in a convergent fashion to assess hippocampal structure and function. For instance, we have recently used behavioural analysis, electrophysiology, and immunohistochemistry to show that prenatal exposure to ethanol can impact hippocampal function well into adulthood. In addition we have also shown that exercise can largely ameliorate these hippocampal deficits. In these particular experiments we can show that reduced neurogenesis in the hippocampus recovers, that reduced synapse numbers can be restored, that reduced synaptic function can be restored, and most importantly, that behavioral functioning can be restored to normal levels. In this particular case, we have also just recently become involved in a group of researchers that will try to determine if these same benefits can be seen in humans with FAS/E. This highlights how I like to direct my research to better understand and alleviate a particular problem in an animal model, hopefully in a manner that offers an easy transfer of knowledge to the human population. The student will be responsable for: -Preparing Solutions (buffers, antibodies dilutions); -Performing the immunohistochemical protocols; -Performing Morphological Analyses (microscope handling and cell counting) I am looking for a self-driven and mature student to work with immunohistochemical protocols. It is necessary to have previous lab. experience, preferentially with morphological metodolologies. It would be desirable that the student has experience with microscope handling, and solution preparation. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of Victoria – Victoria British Columbia Brian Christie 1 0 null English Investigating dynamic network modeling of aging and frailty Our aim is to develop a model of human aging that will further our understanding of how vulnerability to stresses, caused broadly by environmental exposures, increases with age, how such vulnerability varies among people of the same age, and to what extent it can be reversed. Such vulnerability is referred to as frailty: we have quantified it in a frailty index based on deficit accumulation. The frailty index is now widely used in various clinical and epidemiological settings, but its basis largely remains unknown. Here we will apply large-scale computational modeling of complex networks – a quickly expanding area, with applications in many areas such as physics, biology, telecommunications, computer science and sociology - to understand how health changes over time and to what extent they can be controlled. The network model will represent an individual’s health by interconnected nodes, associated with health deficits. Each node is bistable, either in a healthy state or a deficit (damaged) state. Transitions of individual nodes between healthy and deficit states are slow, and random, reflecting environmental influences. We also allow for recovery, i.e. transitions of individual nodes from deficit to health. Note that damaged nodes increase the damage rate of connected nodes, reflecting the increased stress that deficits impose. This interaction, or non-linearity, between nodes naturally extends to allow for complex combinations of deficits, thereby shaping the network dynamics. Our preliminary study allowed us to capture the existing phenomenology of human frailty and mortality with this network model. We have four questions to be addressed: (1) What is the impact of the number of nodes, or of the network topology, used in the model and how do different interactions between nodes modify the outcomes? (2) How do unobserved nodes, not included in the frailty-index, change the behavior of the model? In particular, how does the quality of mortality predictions depend upon the detailed construction of the frailty index from all possible nodes? (3) How can sex-related (male vs female) differences in the health trajectories be represented in the model? (4) How can external interventions such as life-style changes or surgery be best represented within the model? Each student will address two of these question. My scientific area is the mathematical modeling of complex dynamical systems. During the last 15 years, my strong focus is on biogerontology and systems biology of aging. I am interested in the investigation of complex dynamical networks representing various aspects of human health, and how, associated with aging and mortality, the interaction between health-related characteristics gives rise to global changes in health. I want to understand the nature of biological aging, and in particular understand how it is affected by environmental challenges on the one hand, and the ability of the organism to sustain or repair the damages caused by the environment on the other. A fundamental question is how one individual's rate of biological aging can be best characterized and measured. Here, computational models can advance our understanding of health changes during aging in individuals and populations. The frailty index is one measure of biological aging that has been developed by us. This index approximates the biological age of an individual and allows individual mortality to be predicted. The frailty index is used by epidemiologists and clinicians in Canada and abroad. To refine the frailty index, we have developed collaborations with different departments at Dalhousie University including Medicine, Physics, Community Health and Epidemiology, Biology, and Mathematics and Statistics. This is an interdisciplinary field of inquiry crossing scientific disciplines such as biogerontology, epidemiology of public health, computational modeling, statistical physics and systems biology. With my colleagues, Professor Andrew Rutenberg from Department of Physics and Professor Kenneth Rockwood from Department of Medicine, we have started to build a large scale computational model of aging based on an interacting network representation of multiple health related measures. This dynamic network modelling framework of health changes in older people characterizes interactions between health variables at different levels of the organism, from cellular to organ/tissue. The project is part of our development and investigation of complex networks to represent the human organism by interconnected health-deficit nodes in a complex stochastic environment. The network model consists of the hundreds of nodes interacting within a specific topology. Our network model is confronted with observational data, including changes in individual health characteristics over time for several populations aged from 20 year old to centenarians. We have four questions that you could address, and you will be able to choose one or two of them that are particularly interesting to you: (1) What is the impact of the number of nodes, or of the network topology, used in the model and how do different interactions between nodes modify the outcomes? (2) How do unobserved nodes, not included in the frailty-index, change the behavior of the model? In particular, how does the quality of mortality predictions depend upon the detailed construction of the frailty index from all possible nodes? (3) How can sex-related (male vs female) differences in the health trajectories be represented in the model? (4) How can external interventions such as life-style changes or surgery be best represented within the model? Our ideal candidate is collegial and has a solid quantitative background, with a good knowledge of at least two of mathematics, physics and computational modeling. You should have know at least one programming language, and ideally be familiar with Matlab or Octave. You should be ready to take initiative in your project, and to read and understand the related research literature. You will work in a collaborative and interdisciplinary environment, so you should also be ready to learn new skills (such as statistical analysis, demographics, and presentation skills) to support your project and to maximize your contribution. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 Dalhousie University – Halifax Nova Scotia Arnold Mitnitski 0 0 null English Development of a Merging Unit Emulator based on IEC 61850 Standard Electric substations are important nodes of the power system where generators, transformers and lines are interconnected. Various quantities such as voltages, currents and status of circuit breakers within a substation are continuously measured and monitored by protection systems to ensure minimum damage to the equipment, safety of human, and integrity of the power system during faults. In conventional substation protection systems, voltages and currents at different locations of the substation are measured and scaled down using voltage and current transformers. The outputs of these transformers which are analog signals are connected to different protective relays through hardwired cables. Measured signals are processed in protective relays using various protection functions to detect any fault or abnormal condition in the substation. Appropriate commands e.g. trip or block signals are issued through hardwired cables to open or close a circuit breaker or to inform other protective relays. Today's, new technology based on IEC 61850 standard is replacing the majority of copper wiring within substation protection system with fiber optic based data communication to minimize the cost and better utilize resources for the design, building, commissioning and maintenance of power system protection and control. In substation protection systems based on IEC61850, instrument transformers are connected to IEDs (Intelligent Electronic Devices) through a communication network called process bus, which includes Merging Units (MUs) and Ethernet switches. Signals measured by instrument transformers are digitized and converted to the Sampled Value (SV) Ethernet packets in the MUs. Trip, blocking, status or any logical signals are transferred through the same network using standard messages. IEDs are connected to process bus to capture and extract data packets within the substation network to perform the critical protection, control and monitoring functions. To be able to test and verify a protection function implemented based on IEC 61850 process bus in the lab environment, it is required to develop a MU emulator where the samples of voltage and currents obtained through the power system simulation recorded in standard format (COMTRADE) is converted to network packets based on IEC 61850-9-2 offline. Then, the network packets are played packed in real time to the communication network where the IEDs under test are connected. The concept of MU emulator was examined by Dr. Dadash Zadeh several years ago and a basic implementation was performed. However, as the IEC 61850 standard has been considerably updated several times since then, he would like to utilize an undergraduate student to develop a MU emulator base on the latest version of the IEC 61850 standard. In addition, the previous implementation was a two-stage process and did not have any graphical user interface (GUI) which made it very difficult to be used by other researchers in the laboratory. In this research project, the main objective is to develop a user friendly software which 1-imports voltage and current samples recorded in the standard format (COMTRADE), 2-converts the data into network packets as per the latest version of IEC 618520-9-2 and 3-publishes the packets into the network in real time. Power system protection and automation have been significantly improved during the last two decades. Microprocessor-based protective relays have replaced electromechanical and solid-state counterparts. Advanced signal processing and intelligent techniques have been employed to enhance the conventional protection techniques. Automation and data networking among protection relays within electric substations have been employed to further enhance protection system performance, develop new protection concepts and reduce the cost of wiring and testing. Even though the level of improvement in this area has been remarkable, studies of significant power system incidents indicate that protection relays are involved, one way or another, in 75% of major disturbances. On the distribution side, by recent integration of distributed energy resources (DERs), not only coordination among protective devices is adversely effected but also the conventional protection philosophy for distribution system is no longer compelling. This has become a limiting factor in integration of DERs and raised significant concerns for utilities. Several initiatives have been launched for modernizing electric systems including the development of wide area measurement system (WAMS) in both transmission and distribution levels to realize smarter electric grid. This has enabled the potential of using wide area information to develop new protection and control techniques to increase the reliability of power system and address various issues of integrating DERs. Dr. Dadash Zadeh's research primarily focuses on power system protection, automation, control and monitoring. His work will utilize wide area information available through communication infrastructure to develop new protection and control functions and philosophies to increase power system protection reliability and address protection challenges of today’s power system with distributed energy resources (DERs). Most of his research projects incorporate simulation, hardware implementation and use of communication. The student first should familiarize him/herself with the COMTRADE file format. Documents related to this topic is available in the web and in the applicant's laboratory. Applicant will provide the student with a sample COMTRADE file. The student is expected to develop a function in C/C++ which 1-imports the file, 2-dissects the analog and digital data and 3- record the data into interim variables. Second, the student should familiarize himself with IEC 61850-9-2 data packet formats. The applicant will provide related documents and training for the student. The student is expected to develop a function which utilizes the data recorded in the interim variables to generate corresponding network packets. Third, the student will utilize the libpcap library to publish the packets on the Ethernet ports. Several examples are available in the web to help the student. An embedded computer with real-time operating system is available in the laboratory for the student for this implementation. Finally, a graphical user interface software will be developed to control and automate the entire process. The student is expected to contact both supervisors in case he/she requires any assistance in performing the project. Bi-weekly meetings will be held between students and supervisors to check the progress and discuss any technical issue. The students require to have a basic understanding of three phase signal and systems and good proficiency in C/C++ coding. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 Western University Ontario Mohammad Reza Dadash Zadeh 0 0 null English Environmental monitoring of pollutant (fume, dust) transport by identification of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) The Lagrangian framework of description of fluid flow systems becomes one of important tools to answer the question where do particles placed in the advective flow go? In particular, the Lagrangian framework of fluid flow description provides quantitative tools for answering such a question. The advective flow in general is the main type of the transport present in nature (wind, ocean and river currents) and the fundamental characteristic of these flows is their time varying nature. In other words, the non-stationary feature of the flow time evolution requires to come up with the quantitative characterization of the flow characteristics which, given in layman's language, is posed as a question of ``how much two particles drift from each other as they are advected by flow. The answer to that question is a quantifiable pattern of the Lagrangian coherent Structures (LCS) contours representing the material lines or surfaces which fold, elongate and differentiate the flow with the regions of different dynamical behaviour. In other words, the LCS are material lines in the flow of the greatest particle path separation which provide the information of the underlying skeleton of the turbulence and give an insight into the transport of particles within fluid flows from one region to another. In this project, we will develop a computing tool necessary for the state-of-the-art oil business companies to add to their expertise in environmental and pollution monitoring capabilities. Specifically, we will provide a computational tool capable of real-time monitoring the pollutant transport over the Western Canada and Prairies together with integration of freely available data resources (Canadian Daily Climate Data). In more details, we propose: [1)] to acquire, integrate and utilize real-time wind weather data available from Canadian Daily Climate Data (CDCD) and/or other USA Climate Data source; [2)] to compute the flow map of the wind in the provinces and territories and identify the barriers and patterns of possible pollutant transfer; [3)] to conduct a test case as an analysis on flow patterns and pollution associated with the fume distribution with respect to historically available data in the case of large scale wildfire; [4)] to identify the main flow characteristics and provide forecast of the pollutant distribution for both short and long terms; [5)] to identify the pollutant stagnation zones which need to be identified and tracked in order to prevent possible human casualties, environmental and wild life catastrophe. Our research work is concentrated on the development of advanced control and monitoring formulations for distributed parameter systems modelled by linear and nonlinear PDE systems within the chemical, biomedical and environmental engineering area. There is a variety of distributed parameter systems considered in our current research efforts. Optimal and model predictive control (MPC) of chemical packed-bed and tubular reactors. In particular, realizable optimal control formulations have been developed in order to address important aspects of actuator constraints (constraints with respect to capacity of actuator and/or spatial location of actuator implementation), state/output constraints (ability of control configuration to satisfy constraints), state constraints and optimality of the control law with respect to actuator/sensor configuration. Optimal control of crystal growth processes.Within the area of dynamical systems, we consider fluid flow problems within the framework of dynamical systems and it is well-known that there exist special flow patterns within the fluid domain which influence the transport structure and mechanics of the flow. Such structures for a general time-dependent flow, as finite-time invariant manifolds in the extended phase space, and it can be captured in the Lagrangian framework of trajectories. We consider analysis of the flow melt dynamics in two the most important crystal growth processes Czocharlski crystal growth and Bridgman crystal growth process. In the CZ-Si crystal growth process, as it can be shown in left figure, there is a formation of the LCS barrier (red line) which is placed in the vicinity of the melt-solid interface and identifies the pocket within the melt flow such that impurities captured within the pocket will not get back in bulk flow and inevitably will be incorporated in the grown crystal. In the case of Bridgman process, the LCS barriers vary with time as they drift with the time-varying flow emanating from the thermal and buoyancy driven instabilities. The students’ role in the project will be to 1) acquire, integrate and utilize real-time wind weather data available from Canadian Daily Climate Data (CDCD) and/or other USA Climate Data source, 2) to compute the flow map of the wind in the provinces and territories and identify the barriers and patterns of possible pollutant transfer by identification of Lagrangian Coherent Structure (LCS); 3) to conduct a test case as an analysis on flow patterns and pollution associated with the fume distribution with respect to historically available data in the case of large scale wildfire;4) to identify the main flow characteristics and provide forecast of the pollutant distribution for both short and long terms. The major work will be performed in domain of wind data gathering and preprocessing large scale wind data on the regular (square) domain obtained from the stationary wind stations placed on the ground. The wind data v(x,y) will be used as vector field along which initially placed particles are integrated in the 2D space along the trajectories of the wind flow. Finally, it will be required to calculate deformation tensor characteristic for each particle advected within domain and determine the degree of the separation of two close by placed particles advected by the flow. Students with research interests in mathematics, fluid flow modelling and simulation are sought. Exposure to basic numerical methods techniques (RK4,explicit Euler) is desirable. Basic knowledge of finite difference or finite element technique and exposure to MATLAB and/or C/C++ is desirable and knowledge of visualization software Paraview. 1 May, 2015 31 June, 2015 University of Alberta – Edmonton Alberta Stevan Dubljevic 0 0 null English Save the virus, Kill the Cancer: Using viruses to treat cancers Reovirus, a naturally occurring benign human virus, preferentially infects and kills transformed cells (called as oncolysis) while leaving normal non-transformed cells unaffected. Detailed studies thus far have identified the molecular mechanisms whereby reovirus preferentially targets the cancer cells with aberrant Ras signalling and lack of interferon production capacity. Considering this remarkable cancer-killing ability, reovirus has been successfully tested as a novel anti-cancer agent and is currently under phase III clinical trials internationally for the treatment of the cancers of various origins. Although the primary mode of action for reovirus therapy is direct oncolysis, our recent studies have demonstrated that reovirus administration in cancer-bearing hosts additionally induces beneficial anti-cancer immune responses. Specifically, we show that reovirus 1) activates the production of beneficial pro-inflammatory cytokines and homing of immune cells in the tumor milieu, 2) make tumors better targets for immune-mediated attack by enhancing the expression of molecules involved in antigen presentation, 3) endow antigen-presenting cells with a capacity to procure and present tumor antigens, and 4) initiate tumor-specific immunity capable of providing protection against tumor recurrence even after discontinuation of reovirus therapy. These virus-induced anti-tumor immune responses can eradicate existing cancer cells and further maintain active surveillance against the emergence of relapsing cancer cells. If appropriately managed, reovirus thus can simultaneously target cancer through two independent mechanisms: direct oncolysis and anti-tumor immunity. It is now clear that virus-induced anti-tumor immune activities are the most essential component of reovirus-based oncotherapy. Hence the true potential of virus-based anti-cancer therapies can be unleashed only through strategic management of the host immune responses. Therefore, the broad objective of this study is to understand the virus-induced immunological events in the context of cancer-associated immune microenvironment, and further exploit this knowledge to design the therapeutic strategies that will promote greater cancer outcomes. We don’t normally think of viruses as beneficial organisms because they are invariably associated with human diseases. In 1998, we demonstrated that reovirus, a naturally occurring human virus that does not produce any serious illness, is a potent cancer killer. This virus has a unique ability to preferentially kill cancer cells, while leaving the healthy, normal cells unaffected. Thus far, reovirus has been shown to kill the cancers of almost every origin, including breast, pancreas, prostate, ovarian, brain, and colorectal. Reovirus is being tested in humans in Canada, the US, Belgium and the UK as a anti-cancer agent. Recently our laboratory discovered that reovirus-based anti-cancer therapy bears an additional "beneficial" side effect. We observed that, apart from its direct cancer killing activity, reovirus additionally educates the host immune system to attack cancer. Importantly, this virus-induced anti-cancer immune activities are capable of not only killing existing cancer cells, but also targeting any relapsing cancer cells in the future. Thus, reovirus therapy can simultaneously target cancers with two distinct mechanisms: 1) virus-mediated direct killing, and 2) virus-induced anti-tumor immunity. It is now acknowledged that anti-tumor immune activities are the indispensible components of reovirus therapy. For last decade, we have comprehensively studied how reovirus kills the cancer cells. Now, we focus on understanding the virus-induced immunological events in the context of cancers. For this purpose, we first want to dissect the interaction between reovirus, cancer and host. Then, we want to exploit this knowledge to design the complementary strategies that can further potentiate the efficacy of reovirus therapy. We believe that the evidence generated through this project will be valuable to health professionals and cancer-patients alike. It is our hope that the knowledge synthesized through this project will enhance better cancer outcomes, and further promote long-term cancer-free health. The candidate will be assigned a designated research project, and will be responsible for maintaining a detailed record of daily scientific activities in an assigned laboratory book (particularly an information about design and results from the experiments). The candidate is expected to have hands-on experience with scientific techniques. This work term is aimed at advancing his/her theoretical as well as practical scientific knowledge. Students with background in one of the following disciplines will be preferred: Biology, biochemistry, biotechnology, immunology, cancer biology, Immunology, bioinformatics, science, medicine, health Basic knowledge of laboratory techniques will be essential 1 June, 2015 1 September, 2015 Dalhousie University – Halifax Nova Scotia Patrick Lee 1 0 null English Investigations of the optical properties of gold nanoparticles Gold nanoparticles (nps) have tremendous potential in biomedicine. They can be used as absorbing labels inside living cells for the purpose of biomedical imaging, biosensing as well as for photothermal therapy. This project involves fundamental investigations of the optical properties of gold nps as a function of their size, shape, and structure. In particular, we will study the fundamental photothermal properties of such gold nps. The initial research objective of this project will be to model the distribution of the electric field intensity at the surface of gold nps due to the incident laser field. This will be based on finite difference time domain (FDTD) numerical simulations of the light absorbed, reflected and transmitted by the nps. Different shapes and sizes of nps that support excitations of higher order surface plasmon resonance modes, will be explored. Plasmonic nps with optimized optical properties deduced from these simulations, will be fabricated in Prof. Anatoli Ianoul's laboratory at Carleton University. The experimental component of the research project will include testing the plasmonic nps using a newly developed photothermal microscope in Dr. Murugkar's laboratory. This is based on an ultrasensitive optical technique called photothermal heterodyne imaging that permits the detection of individual gold nanoparticles. The increase in temperature at the surface of the gold nps due to the excitation laser beam can be directly measured by means of this photothermal microscope. If time permits, simultaneous photothermal imaging and confocal fluorescence imaging will be performed on live cell samples containing the gold nanoparticles. Stained histopathology is the current gold standard for in vitro disease diagnosis: samples excised from the body of a patient suspected of having a particular disease, are sent to a pathology lab, where they are stained and examined by a microscopist. This is therefore a time-consuming, expensive and often subjective practice. It is crucial to have the ability to provide statistically reliable information, about the molecular-level changes in the diseased sample, in near-real time. Light interacts with living systems at the molecular level, with ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution. My goal is to develop more quantitative and rapid analysis tools based on optical techniques that would provide early disease diagnosis both in vitro and in vivo. My research involves the development and application of techniques in optical molecular imaging. This includes microscopy and spectroscopy based on linear light-matter interactions such as fluorescence and spontaneous Raman scattering, as well as based on nonlinear light-matter interactions such as two photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), second harmonic generation (SHG) and coherent Raman scattering (CRS). The emphasis is on applying these techniques to study the fundamental mechanisms of disease in a label-free, and minimally invasive manner that would lead to potentially significant advances in early diagnostics and treatment. Current research projects in my group involve i) developing novel methods for optical imaging of tissue samples using vibrational and polarization contrast, and ii) developing a photothermal heterodyne imaging setup for the detection of highly absorbing nanoparticles in live cells. My group is also involved in on-going collaborative projects based on the development of a miniature multimodal CARS microscope/ endoscope with Prof. Hanan Anis, in the School of Electrical Engineering at U. Ottawa and the development of biosensors based on arrays of plasmonic nanostructures with Prof. Robert Boyd, CERC in quantum photonics at U. Ottawa. The student will investigate the fundamental photothermal properties of gold nps. Using a commercially available software package, the student will perform finite difference time domain (FDTD) numerical simulations of the light absorbed, reflected and transmitted by the nps. The goal will be to model the distribution of the electric field intensity at the surface of gold nps due to the incident laser field. Different shapes and sizes of nps that support excitations of higher order surface plasmon resonance modes, will be explored by the student using these simulations. As part of the experimental component of the research project, the student will test the plasmonic nps fabricated in a collaborator's laboratory, using an in-house, newly developed photothermal microscope. This is based on an ultrasensitive optical technique called photothermal heterodyne imaging that permits the detection of individual gold nanoparticles. The student will measure the increase in temperature at the surface of the gold nps due to the excitation laser beam using this photothermal microscope. These results will be compared to theoretically expected values. If time permits, simultaneous photothermal imaging and confocal fluorescence imaging will be performed by the student on live cell samples containing the gold nanoparticles. Basic Computer programing skills including data analysis with Matlab is essential. Familiarity with numerical simulations using Lumerical FDTD package is a plus, but not required. Background in nanoscience will be very helpful. Students who enjoy the hands-on experience of setting up optical experiments and data acquisition, are encouraged to apply. 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 Carleton University – Ottawa Ontario Sangeeta Murugkar 0 0 null English Optimization of Surfactant Delivery Systems and Self-Assembling Polymeric Systems The research projects consist on the optimization of two technologies recently developed in my research group; therefore two research internship positions are open. First Research Internship Position: Optimization of surfactant delivery systems The first technology deals with the encapsulation of surfactant molecules for surfactant transport and delivery through porous media. Surfactant injection is a well-known technology in the area of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes. However, the main downside of surfactant flooding applications in the oil field is the largest surfactant adsorption onto porous media, which greatly affects the technical effectiveness of surfactant flooding in the field as well as the economics of the process. For this reason, a surfactant carrier system was recently developed in my research group. Although, this technology has been systematically evaluated in my lab, there is need for optimization. Therefore, the first research Internship position is needed for the optimization of critical parameters of the surfactant carrier system, such us the effect of high temperatures and adsorbent type on the performance of the surfactant carrier systems. This technology has applications in many field that deals with surfactant usage, thus its optimization is significant for several industrial fields. Second Research Internship Position: Evaluation of Self-Assembling Polymer Systems The second technology is related to the evaluation of self-assembling polymer (SAP) systems. The SAP technology was also recently developed in my research group. This technology is aimed for application in polymer flooding for enhanced oil recovery. However, this particular technology requires optimization and consequently more research work is needed to further evaluate the behavior of these SAP systems during flow in porous media and the evaluation of its effectiveness in recovering oil through the application of displacement tests, specifically at high temperatures and high salinities (very harsh reservoir conditions). Consequently, a second research Internship position is required to carry forward the evaluation of these SAP systems during flow in porous media at harsh reservoir conditions (temperature and salinity) and their effectiveness in recovering crude oil. The principal applicant; Dr. Laura Romero-Zerón, a chemical engineer who specializes in the energy field, has research and practical experience in the application of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques for production of fossil fuels and oil processing. At UNB, she is participating in the education and research training of highly qualified personnel (HQP) in the energy engineering field that currently faces a dramatic shortage in Canada. To date, Dr. Romero-Zerón’s research contributions are focused in the energy sector. She is conducting research on EOR techniques to optimize oil production in mature reservoirs and/or in oil formations that might not be produced by conventional methods. Presently, her research program can be divided into four research fronts: EOR processes (chemical flooding), Oil production surface operations, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for monitoring multi-phase flow in porous media, and upgrading of heavy oil and bitumen. Dr. Romero-Zerón has actively disseminated her research work, publishing papers in peer-reviewed journals, edited a book in EOR and Bioremediation of Oil Contaminated Sites, authored a chapter on Advances in EOR processes, coauthored a book on techniques for Improving Reservoir Conformance, authored several technical reports, and has presented papers at numerous international conferences. Her research work has been supported by a variety of research grants, including an NSERC Discovery Grant, NSERC CRD, NBIF through the RAI program, UNB University Research Fund, contracts with local private companies, Alberta Energy Research Institute through the COURSE Program, funds made available by her former PhD supervisor through the Canada Research Chair in Energy and Imaging, and PDVSA International Scholarship. Dr. Romero-Zerón also has experience in managing research groups. Currently, Romero-Zerón is supervising 1 Postdoctoral fellow, 1 PhD candidates, 3 Master Science graduate student, and 3 undergraduate students. First Research Internship Position: The research assistant will be involved in the research activities outlined below. These research activities will be directly supervised by the applicant, who will train the research assistant in each of the specific stages of the research work. • Installing the experimental set-up for dynamic adsorption tests at high temperature (80oC) and different porous media. • Conducting the dynamic adsorption tests experiments. • Organization and analysis of the experimental data. • Weakly presentations of the progress of the research project. • Preparation of technical biweekly technical reports. • Preparation of a final internship report. Second Research Internship Position: In this project related to the optimization of SAP systems, the student will be trained by the applicant and under close supervision of the applicant the student will be responsible for the research activities listed as follows. • Setting-up the displacement tests for the evaluation of the SAP systems in porous media • Conducting the crude oil displacement tests at different conditions of temperature and salinity. As well as for the displacement of different crude oils. • Organization and analysis of the experimental data. • Weakly presentations of the progress of the research project. • Preparation of technical biweekly technical reports. • Preparation of a final internship report. • Research skills and research experience • Petroleum or Chemical Engineering background. • Communication skills • Able to work in a team environment • Capable of working under tight deadlines 1 May, 2015 30 August, 2015 University of New Brunswick – Fredericton New Brunswick Laura Romero-Zeron 0 0 null English Biomass to Synthesis Gas: Process Modeling and Simulation The numerical simulation will be performed to optimize the design condition for an entrain flow gasifier. This will allow the design of an entrain flow gasifier with optimal efficiency. The low fidelity simulation will be based on thermodynamic equilibrium analysis using the equilibrium constant approach and Gibbs energy minimization approach. These simulations will help to quickly perform the parametric study of varying oxidizer/moderator ratio with the effect of change in temperature, CO2 production and syngas composition. Also, a simulation of completed power cycle will be model using ASPEN PLUS software to calculate the overall efficiency of the power plant including the energy penalty due to CO2 capture. A high fidelity simulation with comprehensive three dimensional simulation model will be developed for an entrain flow gasifier that incorporates fluid dynamics, reaction kinetics and the effect of heat and mass transfer. This high fidelity simulation in conjunction with low fidelity simulation will help to design the reactor geometry and as well as the optimal operating parameters to achieve higher efficiency. My overall research focus is on developing chemical and engineering solutions for the catalytic conversion of biomass-derived feedstocks to synthetic gas (syngas) and biofuels. Also, I possess a diverse and unique set of experiences that have enabled me to contribute immensely to other fields of research and product development such as CO2 generation, capture and application technologies. Over the past six years, my most significant contributions to research have been (1) development of catalytic systems to convert brown glycerol to hydrogen using autothermal reformation technology; (2) development of microporous metal organic framework membranes for hydrogen-rich stream purification; (3) catalyst-aided CO2 capture; (4) catalyst development, reaction kinetics, and reactor modeling for various biofuel production and processing systems; and (5) development of extinguishing underground coal seam fires strategy as an application of captured CO2. My research work has been recognized by being published through numerous research papers in high-impact scientific journals and presented at many national and international conferences. Also, these extensive research and development efforts have resulted in a patent application for novel catalysts and processes for hydrogen production and the development of our $2.7 million Feed-Flexible and Process-Flexible (FFPF) Hydrogen Production Pilot Plant. As a professor with the University of Regina, I continue to have a leading role in the design, construction, commissioning, and operation of the FFPF Hydrogen Pilot Plant. The Plant is designed to test the possibility of using different types of syngas sources as feed to the plant without having to change catalysts or otherwise disrupt plant operations. I am the recipient of numerous prestigious awards for scholarly achievements and research excellence. Most notably, the Regina and District Chamber of Commerce have recognized the scholarship of my research activities. Task 1 – Conduct comprehensive literature review on the subject matter Task 2 – Collect and categorize data Task 3 – Build the gasification model using ASPEN PLUS software or its equivalents Task 4 – Run various simulation scenarios for optimum yield Task 5 – Examine and interpret data Task 6 – Data analysis and reporting - Strong Chemical Engineering Background - Decent knowledge of process simulation software such as ASPEN 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of Regina – Regina Saskatchewan Hussameldin Ibrahim 0 0 null English Optimizing the Catalyzed GTL (Gas-to-Liquid) Process Gas-to-liquids (GTL) is rapidly gaining ground as a commercially-feasible process to utilize remote natural gas resources that otherwise left untapped. GTL process chemically converts synthesis gas (syngas) via the Fischer-Tropsch process to high value transportation fuels such as, diesel, jet fuel, and other valuable chemicals. Canada being the world’s third largest producer of natural gas with average annual production of 6.4 trillion cubic feet, is strongly positioned to be a major player in GTL projects. Most of Canada’s natural gas producing regions are concentrated primarily in the western provinces (Saskatchewan, British Columbia, and Alberta), making Saskatchewan an ideal place to explore research and development in GTL processes. The objective of this research is to optimize the GTL process parameters such as reaction temperature, pressure, feed ratio, catalyst type and amount, etc. for a maximum yield of clean transportable liquid fuels. This has the potential to improve heat integration and considerable reduce energy intensity. Results obtained from this research endeavour will have the potential to be applied to other XTL (e.g. coal to liquids (CTL), and biomass to liquids (BTL). My overall research focus is on developing chemical and engineering solutions for the catalytic conversion of biomass-derived feedstocks to synthetic gas (syngas) and biofuels. Also, I possess a diverse and unique set of experiences that have enabled me to contribute immensely to other fields of research and product development such as CO2 generation, capture and application technologies. Over the past six years, my most significant contributions to research have been (1) development of catalytic systems to convert brown glycerol to hydrogen using autothermal reformation technology; (2) development of microporous metal organic framework membranes for hydrogen-rich stream purification; (3) catalyst-aided CO2 capture; (4) catalyst development, reaction kinetics, and reactor modeling for various biofuel production and processing systems; and (5) development of extinguishing underground coal seam fires strategy as an application of captured CO2. My research work has been recognized by being published through numerous research papers in high-impact scientific journals and presented at many national and international conferences. Also, these extensive research and development efforts have resulted in a patent application for novel catalysts and processes for hydrogen production and the development of our $2.7 million Feed-Flexible and Process-Flexible (FFPF) Hydrogen Production Pilot Plant. As a professor with the University of Regina, I continue to have a leading role in the design, construction, commissioning, and operation of the FFPF Hydrogen Pilot Plant. The Plant is designed to test the possibility of using different types of syngas sources as feed to the plant without having to change catalysts or otherwise disrupt plant operations. I am the recipient of numerous prestigious awards for scholarly achievements and research excellence. Most notably, the Regina and District Chamber of Commerce have recognized the scholarship of my research activities. Task 1 – Conduct comprehensive literature review on the subject matter Task 2 – Collect and scrutinize data Task 3 – Compile, examine and interpret data Task 4 – Data analysis and reporting Strong Chemical Engineering Background 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of Regina – Regina Saskatchewan Hussameldin Ibrahim 0 0 null English UNDERGROUND RESIDUAL OIL GASIFICATION AS AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO EOR Concerns about future energy supply and recent advancements in technology are leading to a renewed emphasis on Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) as EOR techniques can significantly improve the recovery factors. It is estimated that Saskatchewan has approximately 40 billion barrels of oil in place that is a target for the use of Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques. However, prominent EOR techniques such as CO2 injection have some major economical and technological constraints. The technique requires construction of vast network of pipelines from sources to the target basins and hence a significant capital investment is needed that must be supported by long-term production potential of the target basin. Also, among the many other EOR methods tested, only a few have been found to be commercially successful and it has been experimentally proven that EOR methods can yield maximum up to 60-65% of the original oil in place (OOIP) and the remaining oil to be extracted requires long term commitments in capital and human resources as well as extensive Research and Development in EOR practices. The proposed technique of Underground Residual Oil Gasification (UROG) will exploit the challenges and opportunities of improving the recovery in the form of synthetic gas (syngas) beyond the limits of EOR and will significantly help coping with the future energy challenges of increasing energy demand. The UROG technique has the potential of converting unworked residual oil – oil left in the ground – into a combustible gas which can be turned into high value products such as liquid fuels, clean power generation or the production of hydrogen, synthetic natural gas, fertilizers and other chemical feedstocks. This technology will allow countries that are rich in heavy oil such as Canada to fully utilize their resource from otherwise unrecoverable oil deposits in an economically friendly and environmentally sound way. My overall research focus is on developing chemical and engineering solutions for the catalytic conversion of biomass-derived feedstocks to synthetic gas (syngas) and biofuels. Also, I possess a diverse and unique set of experiences that have enabled me to contribute immensely to other fields of research and product development such as CO2 generation, capture and application technologies. Over the past six years, my most significant contributions to research have been (1) development of catalytic systems to convert brown glycerol to hydrogen using autothermal reformation technology; (2) development of microporous metal organic framework membranes for hydrogen-rich stream purification; (3) catalyst-aided CO2 capture; (4) catalyst development, reaction kinetics, and reactor modeling for various biofuel production and processing systems; and (5) development of extinguishing underground coal seam fires strategy as an application of captured CO2. My research work has been recognized by being published through numerous research papers in high-impact scientific journals and presented at many national and international conferences. Also, these extensive research and development efforts have resulted in a patent application for novel catalysts and processes for hydrogen production and the development of our $2.7 million Feed-Flexible and Process-Flexible (FFPF) Hydrogen Production Pilot Plant. As a professor with the University of Regina, I continue to have a leading role in the design, construction, commissioning, and operation of the FFPF Hydrogen Pilot Plant. The Plant is designed to test the possibility of using different types of syngas sources as feed to the plant without having to change catalysts or otherwise disrupt plant operations. I am the recipient of numerous prestigious awards for scholarly achievements and research excellence. Most notably, the Regina and District Chamber of Commerce have recognized the scholarship of my research activities. Task 1 – Conduct comprehensive literature review on the subject matter Task 2 – Collect and scrutinize data Task 3 – Compile, examine and interpret data Task 4 – Data analysis and reporting Strong Chemical Engineering Background 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of Regina – Regina Saskatchewan Hussameldin Ibrahim 0 0 null English Cognitive Training Adaptive Website To develop a website to support cognitive training tasks for participants of research studies at the University of Calgary to complete at home. The games will be programmed by the incumbent with input from the supervisor. The website must be able to record when participants play, how long they play, as well as the results of each game. Although the student will be supervised by the research team, the incumbent is expected to be knowledgeable about website design, and able to apply that knowledge independently. The web site designer will be expected to work regular hours at the University of Calgary, and overtime is not expected. The human brain has the capacity to change and modify with experience. Experience, including cognitive training, causes changes in the brain and these brain changes can be measured using behavioural measures (e.g., performance on cognitive tasks) and using structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging. The laboratory training literature on working memory (i.e., ability to maintain and manipulate information) demonstrates that training can lead to improvement on non-practiced tasks, including related domains (e.g., response inhibition) and fluid intelligence (i.e., ability to reason and solve novel problems). Training on working memory may generalize to tasks and processes not specifically practiced as working memory is associated with the broader construct of intelligence. In this research program we will investigate how working memory performance, non-trained cognitive abilities, fluid intelligence, and prefrontal and parietal cortical regions change as a result of working memory training and whether these changes are maintained in the short-term as measured by behaviour and functional and structural MRI. We hypothesize that working memory training improves cognitive performance and fluid intelligence and increases prefrontal and parietal grey matter function and structure. Additionally, we hypothesize that the behavioural and brain gains made through working memory training will be retained in the short-term. The proposed research program has the ability to inform current knowledge about how cognition and the brain change with working memory training and how working memory training may relate to fluid intelligence. If working memory training can reliably influence fluid intelligence and these changes are found to be sustainable, these findings would have a large impact on theories that traditionally view fluid intelligence as relatively fixed. We are looking for individuals to helps us develop a website for cognitive training. • Plans site design by clarifying goals; designing functionality. • Develops site navigation by categorizing content; funneling traffic through content. • Develops site content and graphics by coordinating with copywriters and graphic artists; designing images, icons, banners, audio enhancements, etc. • Develops and programs cognitive training games, ensures that games are adaptive (i.e., games increase in difficulty as task performance improves), and makes the information about performance accessible to the research team • Prepares site by installing and configuring server software; installing programming language using authoring and formatting tools; ensuring cross-platform compatibility; establishing links. • Upgrades site by updating content and graphics; monitoring performance and results; identifying and evaluating improvement options; introducing new technology; maintaining links. • Ensure that the data collected by the website will be maintained on a secure server • Maintains site appearance by developing and enforcing content and display standards; editing submissions. • Provides information by collecting, analyzing, and summarizing data and trends. • Test the website and identify any technical problems. • Accomplishes information systems and organization mission by completing related results as needed. • Knowledge in a web design program or equivalent • Have skills in software programming and graphics • Have creativity and imagination • Be adaptable and able to pick up new techniques • Have good interpersonal and communication skills • Have the ability to work alone or with a team • Able to work according to tight deadlines, while still being thorough and precise • Have the ability to multi-task • Be aware of international web standards and protocols • Be able to show independence and initiative. 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 University of Calgary – Calgary Alberta Vina Goghari 0 0 null English Modeling of integrated oilsand and agroecosystem Canada’s shale gas reserves offer tremendous potential for long term growth and employment for Alberta and for Canada. This resource helps reinforce Canada’s position as a stable, dependable source of oil and natural gas for national and international markets. However, concerns over the extraction and management of this resource are causing resistance from citizens and stakeholders because of the potential water and soil contamination. Land use changes due to oilsand are strong determinants of soil degradation, absorption and diffusion of pollutants. However, the whole life cycle of oilsand wastewater is poorly understood because of complex natural abiotic processes such as soil absorption and filtration of chemicals, and biotic recycling via root systems and soil microorganisms. Indirect effects from oilsand could be detrimental, but there is a scarcity of data to verify current claims. There are also major knowledge gaps in how the oilsand pollutants will degrade and diffuse through the biogeochemical processes above and below ground once they are inputted to a site or a watershed. Hydrological models are the dominant tools for assessment of environmental impacts of chemicals on a site or watershed. However, hydrological models cannot capture the natural abiotic and biotic processes of oilsand chemicals due to lack of abiotic and biotic functions and anthropogenic actions in agricultural and rural regions. The advent of agroecosystem modeling has provided improved opportunities to develop a modeling framework of dynamic interactions among nutrients, water, pollutants, soil, and flora with or without oilsand in rural regions. Our previous work on the agroecosystem modeling using Denitrification Decomposition (DNDC) helps to establish our position in terms of the needs of integrated modeling of oilsand and agroecosystem. DNDC is a flag model of agroecosystems, which couples oilsand and biogeochemical processes. DNDC contains four interacting submodels: thermo-hydraulic, denitrification, decomposition and plant growth, which are essential to couple land-water-atmosphere interactions in order to study dynamic interactions among nutrients, water, soil, flora and climate above and below ground. The objectives of this proposed project are to develop a modeling framework of an integrated oilsand and agroecosystem for deeper understanding of the environmental impacts of oilsand on agricultural and rural systems in Canada. We will develop a new submodel on abiotic and biotic processes of oilsand pollutants, coupling with the existing four submodels of DNDC. This will provide a unique capability to study biogeochemical degradation, absorption and diffusion of pollutants with emphasis on dynamic interactions among pollutants, water, nutrient, soils, vegetation and climate. This project will also help identify key factors, design and implement effective monitoring systems for the environmental impacts of oilsand pollution on rural regions, and propose practical mitigation measures for watershed management of the cumulative effects of oilsand. Finally, this will help ensure the sustainability of shale gas production and enhance industry credibility for addressing public concerns over oilsand infrastructure developments and for achieving public acceptance of the process across Canada. Professor Junye Wang is currently Campus Alberta Innovates Program Research Chair and manages a group of environmental modelling. Prof. Wang’s researches focus on energy, environment and sustainability. He has over 30 year experience of multi-scale and multidisciplinary modeling and is internationally recognized as a leader. His research program is aimed at integrating agroecosystem, land use change and Geographic Information System (GIS) to assess environmental impacts of expanding biogas, bioenergy crops and land use change with emphasis on their interactions. He has developed various modeling and simulation of various physical, chemical and biological systems using various numerical and empirical approaches, such as lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and agroecosystem modelling (IPCC and process-based approaches) with a broad range of applications, such as agroecosystems, soil carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emission and mitigation, nutrient cycling, water and hydrology, fuel cells/microbial fuel cells, thermofluid systems, porous media and bioenergy. His researches were highlighted by governments and organizations, such as European Commission in Science for Environment Policy, Earth Emphasis and Renewable Energy Global Innovation. He looks to expand capacity of agroecosystem modeling and computational sustainability to develop an integrated framework for assessment of environmental impacts of unconventional oil and gas (oil sands and hydraulic fracturing) production on agroecosystem and identify key factors of the cumulative effects for watershed management across Alberta and Canada. He has authored more than 50 refereed journal papers and serves associate editor and editorial board member of several international journals. He is a reviewer of papers for about 40 journals and an assessor of proposals and final reports for three research councils (EPSRC, NERC and ESRC) in the UK. These two students will support postdoctoral researchers who work on modeling of integrated oilsand and agroecosystem. Two students will focus on code developments and validations of biogeochemical and hydrological processes respectively. programming (C or C++), Environmental modelling, agroecosystem, biology and microbiology, soils, computing, numerical computation, biogeochemical modelling, hydrological modelling, GIS. 1 May, 2015 1 June, 2015 Athabasca University – Athabasca Alberta Junye Wang 0 0 null English Synthesis, characterization and applications of ceramic membranes by sol-gel method Separation processes by using membranes technology (Figure 2.12) are becoming popular in petrochemical industries (Armor, 1998), chemical industries (Guliants et al., 2004), environmental sciences (Sikdar et al. 1998; Bart et al. 1996), biotechnology (Cui et al., 2003), pharmaceuticals (Gabelman et al., 1999) water treatment (Hoand Sirkar, 1992) and other industries. These industries use different water purification processes. Mostly these processes are based on size separation by membranes. It can be classified as: i) Reverse osmosis process, ii) Nanofiltration (NF) process, iii) Ultrafiltration process, iv) Micro-filtration process. Most of the membrane technologies presently focused on ultrafiltration and microfiltration processes. Porous inorganic solid material is studied widely after seventies. The important aspects of this class of material are their large surface area and wide range of pore structures. This quality of inorganic materials can be effectively used in catalysis and separation processes. Inorganic membranes can be most commonly used in separation processes. It is true that organic membranes are in wide application in separation processes but inorganic membranes offer special properties such as chemical inertness to most of organic solvents, high temperature application, and resistance to extreme pH and biological degradation. This makes them suitable candidate for industrial applications. Sol-gel method is most preferable in the synthesis of inorganic membranes. In this method a sol of the precursor is prepared and coated on membrane support, which converts to gel on the surface of support substrate. Further the coated support is calcined to obtain microporous or mesoporous metal oxide membrane. Several other methods have been studied for the synthesis of inorganic membranes. But the cost of manufacturing was very high as compared to sol-gel method. The other reason of lack of interest in other methods is due to their poor control on microstructure growth and narrow applicable range of materials. The main objectives of the project are: (1) Synthesis of ceramic membranes by sol-gel method of various pore sizes in microfiltration and ultrafiltration range. (2) Characterization of the synthesized membrane by using different characterization techniques. (3) Permeation studies of different feed solutions which are of commercial and environmental relevance. Methodology: Sol-gel method will be used in the synthesis of ceramic membranes. The synthesized membranes will calcined in high temperature furnaces. The synthesized membranes will be characterized by various characterization techniques such as TEM/SEM, AFM, BET and XRD analysis. We have good setup for testing of ceramic membrane. The various pore sizes in the range of microfiltration and ultrafiltration ceramic membranes can be fitted in this set up for the permeation and separation studies. Dr. Ajay K. Dalai is a professor of Chemical Engineering and Canada Research Chair of Bioenergy and Environmentally friendly chemical processing, and has been spear-heading a big research group of about 25 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows (PDFs) since 2000 in the Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering Laboratories, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan. Dr. A.K. Dalai’s research areas include environmental catalysis such as alkylates from butane using solid acids and conversion of sulfur-containing compounds from gases, waste water and other streams; chemical processing and products development; upgrading and hydrotreating of crude petroleum feedstocks; alternative renewable energy production such as hydrogen and bio-diesel from biomass and bio-oils; production and application of carbon supports such as carbon nanotubes, ordered mesoporous carbons, carbon nanohorns, and their potential applications for the conversion synthesis gas (mainly CO H2) to clean/green transportation fuels by the gas-to-liquid (GTL) technology via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis approach. In this regards, he has supervised research activities on the development of a novel ceramic materials for the conversion of synthesis gas alcohols (mostly linear alcohol, predominantly, ethanol) using alkali promoted trimetallic CoRhMo catalysts supported on various carbon materials (e.g. Multi-walled carbon nanotube Activated carbon), with an approved full patent rights reserved to his credit. With a wide range of sophisticated analytical equipments such as XRD, TPR/TPD, BET, FTIR, TGA/DTA, Raman, etc. and well equipped laboratories and setup for synthesis and application studies of ceramic materials readily available at his disposal coupled with various reactors such as micro-trickle bed CSTRs equipped in his laboratories, cutting-edge research activities is of utmost desirability in his research group. We have very good facility for the synthesis and characterization of ceramic membranes at our place. The role of student is to get hands on experience in the synthesis of various ultrafiltration and microfiltration membranes. The synthesized membranes needs to be characterized by using various characterization techniques such as TEM, AFM, BET, XRD, etc. and flux determination. In addition to this in the application part of these membranes the student will get experience in separation of value added product and can develop environmentally benign processes and protocols. It is expected that student should have good scientific attitude with good interpersonal skills and well versed in chemistry and chemical engineering fundamentals. The knowledge of various computer software and expertise will be added advantage. 1 June, 2015 30 August, 2015 University of Saskatchewan – Saskatoon Saskatchewan Ajay Dalai 0 0 null English Influenza Vaccination and the Effect of Local Herd Immunity Vaccination remains the most effective public health measure to prevent influenza infection and its related complications. While there is vast literature on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of influenza vaccination, limited information is available on how vaccination of small population settings will impact the disease spread in the population. This is referred to the concept of “local herd immunity”, which is developed by vaccinating a certain number of individuals in a specific location. Examples of such locations include workplaces (such as small and firm businesses) in a population setting, or specific healthcare facilities. Vaccinating individuals in such locations (above the threshold of herd immunity) will impact disease dynamics and spread in two important (direct and indirect) ways. First, it will prevent possible institutional outbreaks that are commonly reported during seasonal influenza epidemics. Second, it will reduce the chance of infection transmission to other community members when interacting within or outside the workplace. This research project aims to evaluate the effect of this local herd on mitigating influenza spread in the wider community (i.e., how it affect the global herd immunity). This evaluation will address the following specific questions pertaining to the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of vaccination programs: 1) What is the effect of local herd immunity in specific workplaces on controlling the wide-spread infection in the population? 2) What is the influence of the local herd immunity on the population-level of herd immunity? 3) Could local herd effects reduce the threshold of herd immunity in the population? What are the specific conditions for this to happen? 4) How high should the vaccination coverage of specific settings be in order to influence community herd immunity or vaccination coverage of the population? 5) How cost-effective is the targeted workplace vaccination compared to the general public vaccination policies? We propose to use mathematical and computational models to address these questions using data available for specific settings, for example a workplace. Models could be developed in the form of deterministic, stochastic, or even agent-based to capture various scenarios more realistically. My research broadly involves application of mathematical and computational modelling to the fields of biology and epidemiology, particularly to the infectious disease dynamics, evolution, prevention and control. Central to my research activities is the development of in-silico models with the inclusion of pathogen-population variables, and parameters describing relationships between the variables, to deal with data that are more heterogeneous, less coarse, and more complex. The theoretical and computational analysis of such models are carried out by employing mathematical theories and statistical analysis. Such rigorous analysis yields useful information that can reveal the underlying causes of disease emergence and resurgence (e.g., pandemic influenza and seasonality in epidemic patterns of infections like influenza and measles), or conditions for invasion of a pathogen, the identification of effective intervention strategies, and the dynamics of competitive interferences between pathogen strains. Management of a disease using mathematical and computational models requires an understanding of the fundamental principles of infection mechanisms within and between hosts. Characterizing the general properties of infectious agents through models can help predict whether intervention strategies can be successful in reversing epidemic growth if applied efficaciously at different stages of an outbreak. This motivates my current focus on the development of immuno-epidemiological models that integrate the within-host pathogen dynamics (micro-dynamics) and between-host disease processes (macro-dynamics). Recent advances in virology, immunology, epidemiology and evolutionary biology provide a cornerstone for such integration, which is an essential step towards rationalizing the criteria for global elimination of persistent pathogens, and identifying effective preparedness strategies for emerging infectious diseases. In order to address the questions in this research project, two students will work collaboratively to develop simulation models, and take responsibilities for calibrating and testing models with available data. The first student will develop the simulation modules, execute simulations using high performance compute resources, and will contribute expertise to address questions 1 and 2. The second intern will analyze the simulation outputs, and collaborate closely with the first student to answer research questions 3 and 4. These students work together to answer the last question, and will be closely supervised to ensure that the results are robust and the variability of the outputs due to changes in input data and parameters is evaluated through sensitivity analysis. When the project is completed, both students will be responsible to provide a final report on methodology, findings, and research outcomes. They will also participate in writing scientific articles for possible publications, and dissemination of research outcomes. The students will participate in the ABM-Lab research activities, including seminar presentation, and will work closely with other research trainees and students in a highly collaborative atmosphere. Students should have knowledge of mathematical modelling, analysis, and computer programming and simulations. Experience with simulation software 'Matlab', and computer language C++ would an asset. Students should also have some knowledge of statistical inference for data analysis and evaluation of simulation outcomes, for example methods for conducting sensitivity analysis. Knowledge of regression analysis would be an asset. 1 May, 2015 30 August, 2015 York University – Toronto Ontario Seyed Moghadas 0 0 null English Simulation of Error-Correcting Decoders Polar codes are state-of-the-art error-correcting codes that provably achieve the symmetric capacity of a memoryless channel while having an explicit construction. This project with involve the implementation of a software simulation program for polar decoders. The student will learn about the structure of polar codes and their decoding algorithms. They will then implement the decoding algorithms in software, and perform monte-carlo simulations of the decoder in order to determine the bit-error-rate of communications systems employing polar codes. Error-correcting codes are a vital part of virtually all communication systems, from deep- space communication to cell phones, but also of other systems that are not necessarily associated with communications, such as data storage (magnetic hard disks, optical disks, flash memory, etc.) and, increasingly, communications between peripherals in a computer system, or even communication occurring inside an electronic integrated circuit. When transmitting data from one physical location to another, one has to send a signal strong enough to overcome interference that is naturally occurring and sometimes also artificially generated by other systems. Powerful error-correcting codes have been invented that can result in important savings in the power required to send a data signal from a sender to a receiver. However the complexity of the decoding means that it can become a bottleneck of the performance of the whole receiver system, in terms of fabrication cost, power usage and of the data throughput it can sustain. For this reason, decoding algorithms are typically implemented by dedicated integrated circuits. Our work is performed first at the algorithm level. We improve or re-think existing decoding algorithms to improve the performance of the hardware implementation. We also work directly at the circuit level, to develop novel circuit architectures that perform key computations more effectively. In both cases, the performance of the decoding algorithm must be validated in software before a hardware implementation is considered. The algorithms are validated using the Monte-Carlo method, where the interference on the data transmission is simulated using pseudo-random number generation algorithms. In many cases, it is necessary to demonstrate that the decoding algorithms can achieve very low error rates, such as one error in 10^12 bits transmitted, and this requires simulating a very large data transmission. The student will write computer programs to simulate polar codes in C/C++. The student will conduct experiments with different parameters and prepare plots and graphs to summarize their results. The student will be expected to analyze and optimize their software simulation to minimize the time required to generate results from Monte-Carlo simulation. The student should have a strong background and experience in writing software programs using C or C++. The student should also have a strong background in computer architecture. It is preferable for the student to be familiar with the basic concepts in probability and digital communications. The student should have working knowledge of the English language. 1 May, 2015 24 July, 2015 McGill University – Montréal Québec Warren Gross 0 0 null English Removal of nitrogen and sulfur species from heavy gas oil using functionalized polymers. One of the major problems facing heavy gas oil (HGO) treatment is the high sulfur and nitrogen contents compared to conventional crude oil. The efficiency of sulfur removal in a typical hydrodesulfurizationn (HDS) process is limited, thus a new method is needed to lower the sulfur and nitrogen content in heavy oil gas. Researchers have found that they can achieve higher sulfur removal efficiency in HDS by eliminating nitrogen content from HGO. The presence of nitrogen species poison or inhibit HDS catalysts and lower the quality of the fuel. Nitrogen in gas oil is present predominantly as heterocyclic aromatic species. These nitrogen species are divided into basic and non-basic compounds, which constitutes 60-70% of the total nitrogen species in heavy gas oil. Both types inhibit hydrotreating catalysts thus lowering the efficiency of hydrotreating processes of heavy gas oil. Different methods have been used to remove nitrogen species from gas oil including active carbon and alumina, ionic liquid, ion exchange resins, mesoporous molecular sieves, metal organic frameworks, transit metal salts. However, these methods were not efficient in removing non-basic nitrogen species. Studies have shown that the pretreatment of gas oil with functionalized polymers is a promising method for the removal of nitrogen compounds and refractory sulfur compounds. This method is based on the formation of charge-transfer complexes between the electron rich (p-donors) and electron poor compounds (p-acceptors). The capability and selectivity of this method was correlated to the frontier orbital energies: the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the p-acceptor and the lowest unoccupied molecular level (LUMO) values of the p-donor. The functionalized polymers consist of 3 parts: p-acceptor, linker, and polymer support. The p-acceptor is immobilized on a polymer support, via a linker, to improve the efficiency and selectivity of the p-acceptor toward nitrogen species. In the literature several p-acceptors and polymer supports have been used to remove nitrogen and sulfur from various real and synthesized feeds. Examples for p-acceptors are pyromellitic dianhydride (PN), trinitro-flourenone (TriNF), tetranito-flourenone (TENF), and dicyano-dinitro flourenone (TCN). These p-acceptors were coupled with different polymer supports including polystyrene (PS), poly (styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (PS-DVB), poly (glycidyl-methacrylate) (PGMA), and polyhipe (PH). A recent study by our research group have shown that the pretreatment of bitumen-derivative heavy gas oil with PGMA polymer incorporated with TENF can remove up to 6.7% of the nitrogen species in a single contact using 15:100 polymer to HGO ratio. Our research group has further developed more functionalized polymers, with different combinations of polymer supports, linkers, and p-acceptors, to remove nitrogen species from heavy and light gas oils. The main objective of this proposal to scale up the synthesis of these polymers in order to remove nitrogen compounds from real feeds, HGO and light gas oil (LGO), before desulfurization process. In addition, the base number of the oil, before and after the adsorption process, will be carried out in order to study the selectivity of the process toward either the basic or non-basic nitrogen compounds (ASTM 2896-11). Dr. Ajay K. Dalai is a professor of Chemical Engineering and Canada Research Chair of Bioenergy and Environmentally friendly chemical processing, and has been spear-heading a research group of about 25 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows (PDFs) since 2000 in the Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering Laboratories, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan. Dr. A.K. Dalai’s research areas include environmental catalysis such as alkylates from butane using solid acids and conversion of sulfur-containing compounds from gases, waste water and other streams; chemical processing and products development; upgrading and hydrotreating of crude petroleum feedstocks; alternative renewable energy production such as hydrogen and bio-diesel from biomass and bio-oils; production and application of carbon supports such as carbon nanotubes, ordered mesoporous carbons, carbon nanohorns, and their potential applications for the conversion synthesis gas (mainly CO H2) to clean/green transportation fuels by the gas-to-liquid (GTL) technology via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis approach. Thus, Dr. Dalai has several laboratories in the chemical engineering department including catalyst preparation laboratory, analytical laboratory, petroleum laboratory, and he shares the pilot plant with other researchers. Hydrotreating of heavy oil has been the focus of Dr. Dalai’s petroleum group in the past few years. The petroleum laboratory is equipped with 6 microscale trickle bed reactors that are used solely for petroleum projects. In addition, various sophisticated characterization equipment, such as XRD, TPR/TPD, BET, FTIR, TGA/DTA, Raman, ICP, N/S analyzer, are readily available for researchers in the analytical laboratory. Recently the catalyst preparation laboratory has also been used to synthesize different polymers for the removal of nitrogen and sulfur from heavy gas oil. The intern will be working in conjunction a post-doctoral fellows and graduate students, under the supervision of Dr. A.K. Dalai. Prior working in the lab, the intern will review some articles to familiarize himself/herself with the basic concepts of the project including some recently published papers by our research group or other groups. Further, the intern will take a laboratory safety course and review laboratory regulations for the equipment that will be used in his/her project. The intern will be introduced to the project by working with a senior researcher in the group in polymer synthesis and potentiometric titration. Then the intern will take the lead in preparing polymers in large quantities and scaling up polymer synthesis procedures. The other task of the intern will be analyzing several oil samples every week to determine the base number using potentiometric titration. As time allow, the intern may be introduced to the analytical laboratory to characterize the synthesized polymers and to learn how to operate some equipment such as TGA, FT-IR, NMR and BET. At the end of the project, the intern will submit a written report presenting all the results of his/her work and make an oral presentation to the petroleum group. Currently, Jackson (PhD), Ali (PhD) and Prachee (PhD-student) are working on the synthesis and application of different polymers, focusing on the effect of different components of functionalized polymers. They will provide necessary guidelines and assistance for the intern during his/her work in the project. The successful intern would be an undergraduate student, with chemical engineering or chemistry background, with some experience in polymer synthesis and analytical chemistry, and interests in laboratory work. The intern should have fundamental understanding of basic chemistry and analytical chemistry as well as laboratory safety rules and regulations. The intern should be willing to stay or come back after work hours to monitor or turn-off the reactor. Good written and oral presentation skills are required as the intern will submit a final report and the end of the term summarizing his/her work and recommendations for the project. In addition, the intern may present his/her work in a group meeting and/or conferences. 1 June, 2015 30 August, 2015 University of Saskatchewan – Saskatoon Saskatchewan Ajay Dalai 0 0 null English Conversion of Syngas to Alcohols using CoRhMo-K/MWCNT catalyst: Economic Feasibility Analysis and Commercialization Assessments Mixed alcohols, especially ethanol and C2+ alcohols (higher alcohols) have become a viable option to be explored for commercial clean transportation fuel applications as well as an effective octane number enhancer for motor fuels and also as potential alternative fuel for internal combustion engines due to their high energy content, green nature and environmentally benign footprints as compared to the conventional fossil fuels derivatives. In this regard, the conversion of syngas to higher (C2+) alcohols has garnered immense research interest in the field of syngas conversion to green fuels. These promising alternative fuels are eco-friendly due to their sulfur-free nature; hence could be easily incorporated as additives into gasoline mix or directly be employed as fuel and subsequently integrated in existing transportation infrastructures. The catalytic systems used for the higher alcohol synthesis reaction via syngas conversion can be categorized into two groups based on the products distribution. Alkali-doped high temperature ZnCrO-based and low temperature Cu-based catalytic systems with major product streams consisting of methanol and higher branched alcohols. Fe, Ni, and Co modified low temperature and low pressure methanol synthesis catalysts and alkali-modified MoS2-based catalysts constitutes the second group, and yield a series of product streams consisting mainly of linear primary and gaseous hydrocarbons. Application of catalytic systems with desirable physico-chemical properties for the conversion of syngas to higher alcohols in the so called higher alcohols synthesis (HAS) reaction via the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) route continues to interest academia and industrial researchers. In this regard, alkali-doped MoS2 (ADM) catalyst, promoted with cobalt (Co) and rhodium (Rh) still remains an outstanding catalyst with great potential worthy to be further explored for HAS commercialization. That notwithstanding, undesirable side products such as hydrocarbons and CO2 via methanation and water gas shift reactions which tend to decrease productivity for total higher alcohols could be suppressed by the incorporation of alkali salts (e.g. K, Cs, Li) so as to improve respective products selectivity. Over the years, one of our main research focuses has been to develop novel catalysts for the conversion of syngas to higher alcohols. In this regards, our efforts have produced great success with the development of CoRhMo-K/MWCNT catalytic system to effectively carry out the CO hydrogenation reaction with appreciably high selectivity towards higher alcohols, with up to 39.4 wt% total alcohols selectivity at an optimum syngas feed (H2:CO) molar ratio, temperature and GHSV of 1.25, 330°C and 3.6 m3 (STP)/kgcat.h, respectively. The principle objective of this proposal seeks to develop economic feasibility analysis to explore possible opportunities for potential commercialization of this technology for syngas conversion to higher alcohols using CoRhMo-K/MWCNT catalyst. Process flow diagrams would also be generated as well as scaling-up options appraised for commercial technological applications. Dr. Ajay K. Dalai is a professor of Chemical Engineering and Canada Research Chair of Bioenergy and Environmentally friendly chemical processing, and has been spear-heading a big research group of about 25 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows (PDFs) per year since 2000 in the Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering Laboratories, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan. Dr. A.K. Dalai’s research areas include environmental catalysis such as alkylates from butane using solid acids and conversion of sulfur-containing compounds from gases, waste water and other streams; chemical processing and products development; upgrading and hydrotreating of crude petroleum feedstocks; alternative renewable energy production such as hydrogen and bio-diesel from biomass and bio-oils; production and application of carbon supports such as carbon nanotubes, ordered mesoporous carbons, carbon nanohorns, and their potential applications for the conversion synthesis gas (mainly CO H2) to clean/green transportation fuels by the gas-to-liquid (GTL) technology via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis approach. In this regards, he has supervised research activities on the development of a novel catalysts for the conversion of synthesis gas alcohols (mostly linear alcohol, predominantly, ethanol) using alkali promoted trimetallic CoRhMo catalysts supported on various carbon materials (e.g. Multi-walled carbon nanotube Activated carbon), with an approved full patent rights reserved to his credit. With a wide range of sophisticated analytical equipments such as XRD, TPR/TPD, BET, FTIR, TGA/DTA, Raman, etc., readily available at his disposal for catalysts preparation and extensive characterizations coupled with various reactors such as micro-trickle bed CSTRs equipped in his laboratories, cutting-edge research activities is of utmost desirability in his research group. The intern will be working in conjunction a Ph.D student, Philip Boahene, under the supervision of Dr. A.K. Dalai. The student will be trained on the basic preparation protocols for the preparation of catalyst for syngas conversion applications. Furthermore, the intern will also be introduced to the various characterization techniques for analyzing prepared catalysts. He/she will learn prepare the micro-trickle bed reactor and get it ready for typical catalyst screening tests. Moreover, the intern will be given a thorough operational schedule of the reactors to facilitate in-depth understanding of the operability of the reactors. Subsequently, he/she will then be tasked to develop process flow diagrams and conduct economic analysis to assess the feasibility of possible process scale-up and commercialization of our developed CoRhMo-K/MWCNT catalyst for the conversion of syngas to higher alcohols as applied in micro-trickle bed reactors. In addition, it would be required of the intern to conduct a Life Cycle Assessments (LCA) spanning the project’s entire lifecycle to assess the potential environmental impacts of products/byproducts, process, and possible design of disposal systems. Finally, he/she will prepare a report based on the work performed and make an oral presentation of his/her work to at least 25-30 scientists/students working in the area of Catalysis and Chemical Engineering. Presently, Philip is working on the development of catalysts for the conversion of syngas to higher alcohols; exploring options of consolidating the fine powder form of the CoRhMo-K/MWCNT catalysts into pellets with the incorporation of various binders and also developing new carbon supports to effectively carry out the higher alcohol synthesis reactions. He will be working closely with the intern by providing the necessary guidelines and information regarding process operability, dynamics and flexibilities. The successful intern would be a chemical engineering undergraduate student, academically sound, and proficient in the use of HYSIS/ASPEN softwares with interests in research activities. It would be necessary for the intern to know how to apply these software packages to develop process flow diagrams pending economic analysis assessments. He should also be versatile with the use of Microsoft Excel package for the basic development of charts and graphs resulting from economic analysis assessments to ascertain the potential commercial ramifications of the project. The intern should be able to write-up significant findings of the project, make tentative recommendations, and submit a concise report summarizing the outcome of the project at the end of the internship period. 1 June, 2015 1 August, 2015 University of Saskatchewan – Saskatoon Saskatchewan Ajay Dalai 0 0 null English Lab-on-a-Chip Particle Coating Technology For Biomedicine This research project will involve technique development and device engineering. Specifically, to fully establish our new microfluidic co-flow coating technique, we will develop a protocol to polymerize the coating layer, demonstrate the proof-of-concept capture of the conformity of coatings on non-spherical particles, engineer biocompatible and multiple layer coatings, and test the coating technique with living cells. The outputs of the proposed research project will be in the form of fundamental fluid mechanics (e.g. coating flows) and applications (e.g. the immunoisolation of cells for biomedicine). There will be many opportunities to learn about optical experimental techniques, microfabrication technology, and viscosity dominated fluid mechanics. We welcome enthusiastic students who have diverse interests in engineering, chemistry, biology, physics, and applied mathematics to join the LoFFI in the research and development of microfluidic coating technologies for biomedical applications. One of the major objectives of Ryerson University's Laboratory of Fields, Flows, and Interfaces (LoFFI) is to study fluid flows, interfacial dynamics, and applied electromagnetic fields in two-phase microfluidic systems, leading to the development of lab-on-a-chip microparticle conformal coating technologies that will be useful in applications such as in the coating of cells for cell therapy. In microfluidic channels, the fluid dynamics are often dominated by viscosity and surface tension because of the small dimensions. There are many advantages associated with working in such small length scales. Among the many applications of microfluidics are the miniaturization of biological and chemical assays, the precise synthesis of advanced materials, and the detection of trace amounts of specific molecules. Two-phase (e.g. oil and water) microfluidic systems are also popular for the synthesis of monodisperse emulsions because, to minimize interfacial energy, most mixtures of immiscible fluids naturally destabilize to form droplets. At the LoFFI, a microfluidic particle coating technique will be developed to coat non-spherical particles, individual living cells, and cell aggregates, with a permeable polymer membrane. An acoustic forcing technique will also be explored to take the place of magnetic forcing, so that eventually biological materials such as cells can be coated without magnetic tags. Our goal is to eventually apply our coating technique to coat and protect cells from the host's immune system during cell therapy treatments. In cell therapy (e.g. for the treatment of type 1 diabetes), injected cells are often destroyed by the immune system during delivery. We want to coat the cells with a polymeric membrane that conforms to the shape of the cells, protects them from the immune system, and allows biomolecules to transport to and from the cell. Experimental work in the development of a protocol to polymerize the coating layer, demonstrate the proof-of-concept capture of the conformity of coatings on non-spherical particles, engineer biocompatible and multiple layer coatings, and test the coating technique with living cells. Required background: - registration in an undergraduate program in one of mechanical engineering, chemical engineering, biomedical engineering, materials engineering, chemistry, biology, physics, or applied mathematics Required skills: - ability to conduct experiments - able to work independently - working knowledge of one of Matlab, OriginPro, or Microsoft Excel 30 May, 2015 30 August, 2015 Ryerson University – Toronto Ontario Scott Tsai 0 0 null English Educational Game - PvP Gaming Function Enhancement for Multiplayer Educational Game for All In the past, we have developed a chessboard like Web-based Multiplayer Game (http://megaworld.is-very-good.org) for learning. The game allows teachers to create their own game world maps, NPCs, quests and items. The students can pickup quests from NPCs in vary places. Currently the game has administration portal for adding new NPCs, items, quests, buildings, and landscapes as well as expanding the size of the world (and cities, etc.). NPCs in the game can not only prepare quests for players and give players necessary items, but can also sell players things they need. The game now needs PvP gaming function so players can interact with others much more. Furthermore, the function can also make players get excited and further make players gear up themselves by doing quests and self-training. Dr. Chang's feature research area is game-based learning. I continue to design games for teaching, learning, rewards, and assessment. In the last six years, I have designed and developed various educational games on different platforms include desktop computers, smartphones, and televisions to assist users learning history and culture, programming language, financial concepts, management information systems and activities of daily living, and help elders with disabilities to improve selective attentions and to gain higher quality of life as well as encouraging young females to do physical activity. All of the games have computational intelligence components built-in to provide users personalized and adaptive learning experiences. The experiments and pilots do show positive and encouraging outcome. My research finds that the students' voluntariness of using games for learning is affected by their attitudes toward the computer games; however, no effects of gender differences are found. Moreover, female students have more positive attitude and willingness toward educational games. I also pay attention on the design of learning activity rewards and their effects. I use quantitative methods to see the effectiveness of educational game rewards, the results have indicated that students have significantly much better academic achievements at the end of the course. On the other hand, I believe that implicit assessment is good for students who do not like explicit exams or who suffer from exam related stress. Therefore, I conduct research on the design of assessment games and quests. I also use qualitative research methods for analyzing the important factors of designing assessment games. Several important findings can be found in the portfolio of my academic publications. I have published 9 journal papers and 13 conference papers in this research area. The student needs to design and implement PvP gaming interface (as well as necessary editors for entering all necessary data), mechanism, and function with JSP and AJAX. In addition, the student also needs to do (1) the design of the action and reaction that players may have during the fight; (2) the design of flexible and extensible database schema for storing the skills (and its effects and cooldowns), the equipment, the rankings, the titles, the characteristics, and the stats that players have; (3) the effect and the calculation principle of different actions such as defending, backstab, rushing attacking, etc. may cause; (4) the learning, reaching and training (leveling) ways for different skills that players may have; (5) the relationships among skills and the prerequisites that different skills may have such as assassin/rouge and thief and the strength and the dexterity/agility requirement for the use of particular swords and bow; (6) the design of PvP area in the field of the game world and the arena in the cities; and (7) the mechanism of duel request in the non-PvP area in the game world and the challenge request and ranking gaming mechanism for players challenging each others in the arena. The student can learn how to design and implement real-time web-based PvP gaming function with HTML5 (HTML/CSS/JavaScript), AJAX, and JSP techniques. Also, the student can know how to design a pilot to gather the perception that players may have toward the game and to do usability analysis for the game. Skills of designing and evaluating a questionnaire's validity and reliability can be learnt either. For doing this project, the student is better to have the following skills or knowledge: • Having experience in playing any kind of RPG and MMORPG, e.g., World of Warcraft, Diablo, Dungeon Dragon, etc. • Having experience in playing web-based multiplayer games. • Familiar with HTML/XML, CSS, and Java Script • Familiar with JSP and SQL commands • Information collection, re-organization, summarization, and reports • Using screen capture software and video editing software/tool to creating instructional video clips 12 May, 2015 3 August, 2015 Athabasca University – Athabasca Alberta Maiga Chang 0 0 null English HTML5 based Trading Card Game Past research shows that symbolic educational rewards are meaningless to students, however, at the meantime, students would not appreciate if the real educational rewards are not so useful to them. Of course, 'money' as rewards shouldn’t be considered. Card games are very common and welcome by students in different ages and even for graduate and undergraduate students. But most of card games are either commercial ones or difficult to take as educational reward systems due to its in-game elements are hard to connect to the academic performance of learning activities. The trading card game was developed intends for teachers deliver/give to students according to their performances in different learning activities (e.g., classroom participation, discussions, assignments, quiz, exams, etc.). There are three different card types and five card levels (i.e., rarity of a card and five star card is very powerful and rare to see, and of course, to receive from the teacher). Also, the cards can be designed by us simply since the game is developed by ourselves. It is worth to mention, the game supports multiple languages and players who use different languages can still play and compete with each others. The tasks of this position deal with converting and porting an existing Flash ActionScript 3.0 based educational reward game into an AJAX HTML5-based one. New relevant functions have to be developed in modularized JSP pages to give flexibility and reusability in future development and enhancement for working with other systems. Dr. Chang's feature research area is game-based learning. I continue to design games for teaching, learning, rewards, and assessment. In the last six years, I have designed and developed various educational games on different platforms include desktop computers, smartphones, and televisions to assist users learning history and culture, programming language, financial concepts, management information systems and activities of daily living, and help elders with disabilities to improve selective attentions and to gain higher quality of life as well as encouraging young females to do physical activity. All of the games have computational intelligence components built-in to provide users personalized and adaptive learning experiences. The experiments and pilots do show positive and encouraging outcome. My research finds that the students' voluntariness of using games for learning is affected by their attitudes toward the computer games; however, no effects of gender differences are found. Moreover, female students have more positive attitude and willingness toward educational games. I also pay attention on the design of learning activity rewards and their effects. I use quantitative methods to see the effectiveness of educational game rewards, the results have indicated that students have significantly much better academic achievements at the end of the course. On the other hand, I believe that implicit assessment is good for students who do not like explicit exams or who suffer from exam related stress. Therefore, I conduct research on the design of assessment games and quests. I also use qualitative research methods for analyzing the important factors of designing assessment games. Several important findings can be found in the portfolio of my academic publications. I have published 9 journal papers and 13 conference papers in this research area. In this project, the student needs to: 1. convert an existing Flash ActionScript 3.0 based educational reward game into an AJAX HTML5-based one 2. design and implement combat search and replay function 3. design and implement card collection book 4. design and implement card management function for game masters to add new cards into the game 5. design and implement card power measuring function based on card's types, attributes, effects, and effect duration so game masters can create new cards in different levels easier. The student can learn how to design and implement real-time web-based gaming function with HTML5 (HTML/CSS/JavaScript), AJAX, and JSP techniques. Also, the student can know how to design a pilot to gather the perception that players may have toward the game and to do usability analysis for the game. Skills of designing and evaluating a questionnaire's validity and reliability can be learnt either. For doing this project, the student is better to have the following skills or knowledge: • Having experience in playing any kind of Trading Card Games (paper-based or electronic). • Familiar with Flash ActionScript 3.0 • Familiar with mySQL and SQL commands • Familiar with JSP functions • Familiar with HTML/XML, CSS, and Java Script • Historical combat searching, logging, and reviewing • Information collection, re-organization, summarization, and reports • Using screen capture software and video editing software/tool to creating instructional video clips 12 May, 2015 3 August, 2015 Athabasca University – Athabasca Alberta Maiga Chang 0 0 null English Educational Game - Multiplayer Educational Game for All (MEGA World version 3.0) In the past, we have developed a chessboard like Web-based Multiplayer Game (http://megaworld.is-very-good.org) for learning. The game allows teachers to create their own game world maps, NPCs, quests and items. The students can pickup quests from NPCs in vary places. Currently the game has administration portal for adding new NPCs, items, quests, buildings, and landscapes as well as expanding the size of the world (and cities, etc.). NPCs in the game can not only prepare quests for players and give players necessary items, but can also sell players things they need. The game now needs further enhancement so the game's usability for both of teachers and students can be enhanced. Dr. Chang's feature research area is game-based learning. I continue to design games for teaching, learning, rewards, and assessment. In the last six years, I have designed and developed various educational games on different platforms include desktop computers, smartphones, and televisions to assist users learning history and culture, programming language, financial concepts, management information systems and activities of daily living, and help elders with disabilities to improve selective attentions and to gain higher quality of life as well as encouraging young females to do physical activity. All of the games have computational intelligence components built-in to provide users personalized and adaptive learning experiences. The experiments and pilots do show positive and encouraging outcome. My research finds that the students' voluntariness of using games for learning is affected by their attitudes toward the computer games; however, no effects of gender differences are found. Moreover, female students have more positive attitude and willingness toward educational games. I also pay attention on the design of learning activity rewards and their effects. I use quantitative methods to see the effectiveness of educational game rewards, the results have indicated that students have significantly much better academic achievements at the end of the course. On the other hand, I believe that implicit assessment is good for students who do not like explicit exams or who suffer from exam related stress. Therefore, I conduct research on the design of assessment games and quests. I also use qualitative research methods for analyzing the important factors of designing assessment games. Several important findings can be found in the portfolio of my academic publications. I have published 9 journal papers and 13 conference papers in this research area. One or more student can choose (or collaborate together) to design and implement the following enhancement features: (include but not limit to, as intern students can also develop any function that they believe will be appreciated by players and teachers): 1. quest filter based on map types and maps 2. rich information for the game world maps 3. building management includes its level and strength and access control (for particular profession, user, and level) for different building types and individual buildings 4. in-game land and house purchasing and management 5. player's avatar and registration verification (including system randomly choosing the outlook of avatars for players) 6. NPC wandering behavior design 7. player's profession management and control 8. experience points and levels up/down control 9. new quest types, e.g., defend a place/area (with and without time limit); destroy a building (with and without time limit); and, programming 10. in-game bags: item management and size management 11. prevent cheating on solving quest 12. random variable settings, displaying, and solving for repeatable quest 13. making gaming functions like quest rewarding and data encryption more efficient 14. in-game bank creation, purchasing, and storing/taking 15. allowing players to buy empty journal which can record significant event when players choose to and players can add/update/delete notes on that recorded event 16. trade in-between players 17. management UI for deleting a player and cleaning correspondent tables 18. management UI for player password reset and password reminder 19. using arrow keys to move avatars in the game world 20. manual (via arrow keys) and automatic (via clicking on particular place of the map) travelling path planning 21. bonus points trading for avatar's attribute 22. guest offering mechanism enhancement (i.e., a quest can have more than one quest giver) 23. prequest design, management, and verification mechanism 24. portal management (include access control and fee charging mechanics) 25. self registration for teachers The student can learn how to design and implement real-time HTML5 (HTML/CSS/JavaScript) games, AJAX, and JSP techniques. Also, the student can know how to design a pilot to gather the perception that players may have toward the game and to do usability analysis for the game. Skills of designing and evaluating a questionnaire's validity and reliability can be learnt either. For doing this project, the student is better to have the following skills or knowledge: • Having experience in playing any kind of RPG and MMORPG, e.g., World of Warcraft, Diablo, Dungeon Dragon, etc. • Having experience in playing web-based multiplayer games. • Familiar with HTML/XML, CSS, and Java Script • Familiar with JSP and SQL commands • Information collection, re-organization, summarization, and reports • Using screen capture software and video editing software/tool to creating instructional video clips 12 May, 2015 3 August, 2015 Athabasca University – Athabasca Alberta Maiga Chang 0 0 null English Educational Game-PvE Gaming Function Enhancement for Multiplayer Educational Game for All In the past, we have developed a chessboard like Web-based Multiplayer Game (http://megaworld.is-very-good.org) for learning. The game allows teachers to create their own game world maps, NPCs, quests and items. The students can pickup quests from NPCs in vary places. Currently the game has administration portal for adding new NPCs, items, quests, buildings, and landscapes as well as expanding the size of the world (and cities, etc.). NPCs in the game can not only prepare quests for players and give players necessary items, but can also sell players things they need. The game now needs PvE gaming function so players can interact with animals, monsters, bosses in the fields as well as in the dungeons. Players can benefit from the items (including gears, equipment, potions, quest items etc.), money, and experience points dropped and gained from killing it. Such PvE gaming function can make players have better and fun game experience. Furthermore, the function can also make the solution of quests vary. Dr. Chang's feature research area is game-based learning. I continue to design games for teaching, learning, rewards, and assessment. In the last six years, I have designed and developed various educational games on different platforms include desktop computers, smartphones, and televisions to assist users learning history and culture, programming language, financial concepts, management information systems and activities of daily living, and help elders with disabilities to improve selective attentions and to gain higher quality of life as well as encouraging young females to do physical activity. All of the games have computational intelligence components built-in to provide users personalized and adaptive learning experiences. The experiments and pilots do show positive and encouraging outcome. My research finds that the students' voluntariness of using games for learning is affected by their attitudes toward the computer games; however, no effects of gender differences are found. Moreover, female students have more positive attitude and willingness toward educational games. I also pay attention on the design of learning activity rewards and their effects. I use quantitative methods to see the effectiveness of educational game rewards, the results have indicated that students have significantly much better academic achievements at the end of the course. On the other hand, I believe that implicit assessment is good for students who do not like explicit exams or who suffer from exam related stress. Therefore, I conduct research on the design of assessment games and quests. I also use qualitative research methods for analyzing the important factors of designing assessment games. Several important findings can be found in the portfolio of my academic publications. I have published 9 journal papers and 13 conference papers in this research area. The student needs to design and implement PvE gaming interface (as well as necessary editors for entering all necessary data), mechanism, and function with JSP and AJAX. In addition, the student also needs to do (1) the design of monsters (include humanoid ones), animals, bosses, and elites; (2) the action and reaction that different mobs may have in and out of combat; (3) the design of flexible and extensible database schema for storing the skills (and its effects and cooldowns), the equipment, the drops, the characteristics, the stats, the reactions, the words, and the battle strategies that different mobs have; (4) the effect and the calculation principle of different actions such as defending, backstab, rushing attacking, etc. may cause; (5) the learning, reaching and training (leveling) ways for different skills that players may have; and (6) the relationships among skills and the prerequisites that different skills may have such as assassin/rouge and thief and the strength and the dexterity/agility requirement for the use of particular swords and bow. The student can learn how to design and implement real-time web-based PvE gaming function with HTML5 (HTML/CSS/JavaScript), AJAX, and JSP techniques. Also, the student can know how to design a pilot to gather the perception that players may have toward the game and to do usability analysis for the game. Skills of designing and evaluating a questionnaire's validity and reliability can be learnt either. For doing this project, the student is better to have the following skills or knowledge: • Having experience in playing any kind of RPG and MMORPG, e.g., World of Warcraft, Diablo, Dungeon Dragon, etc. • Having experience in playing web-based multiplayer games. • Familiar with HTML/XML, CSS, and Java Script • Familiar with JSP and SQL commands • Information collection, re-organization, summarization, and reports • Using screen capture software and video editing software/tool to creating instructional video clips 12 May, 2015 3 August, 2015 Athabasca University – Athabasca Alberta Maiga Chang 0 0 null English Kinect Game - Motion-Sensing based Virtual Experiment Environment Rezaei Skinner (2012) have investigated whether integrating motion-sensing games into the mobile learning system can assist in enhancing learning achievement and learning retention. They have found that the motion-sensing games can provide students a relaxed and interactive learning experience via bodily movements. Students can learn knowledge from the external stimuli gradually. Ou and colleagues (2011) use mobile learning system with motion-sensing games to correct student's misconceptions. Their experiment results show that student's learning retention significantly exceeded those who use a mobile learning system without motion-sensing games. Li and colleagues (2012) explore the effects of applying webcam-based motion-sensing games for training autistic students’ sensory integration. They have found that not only the participants perceived positive attitude toward the game but also the game improves the effect of the training and makes students hope the training can be continued longer and take the training every day. Many virtual or software games have designed and implemented for students learning Physics. However, only few of them take accurate Physics rules and equations into consideration in the system design. Amongst those games in which more accurate Physics rules have been applied, they don’t provide students immersive experiences in playing. This research project doesn’t only apply accurate Physics rules into the virtual experiment environment design with the help of professors from Centre of Science, Athabasca University, but also give students immersive experiences in doing Physics experiments via the natural user interface. Kissco (2011) expresses his excitement by predicating that Kinect will become a focal classroom technology in the next few years. Hsu (2011) explores the idea of using Kinect as interactive technology to help teaching and learning. She has found that Kinect has the potential to enhance classroom interactions and to engage students participating learning activities. Jamie and McRae (2011) develop a molecular manipulation game with human gesture interface by using Kinect to allow students playing "elements" and learning. They think such game can be used in lectures, tutorials, and even by students at home. Lee and colleagues (2012) try to integrate embodied interaction into learning to enhance student's learning experience and to improve student's learning performance by using Kinect. Their research results also found that the intrinsic motivation of students is high and the students do still pay attention on learning due to they can see their peers and adjust themselves based on peer observation. Nakamura et al. (2013) conduct a study on the relationship between student learning attitude and the effect of using Kinect self-learning system. They have found a strong negative correlation between passive learning attitude and the effect of using Kinect self-learning system. This research project aims to develop a virtual experiment environment in Kinect. Dr. Chang's feature research area is game-based learning. I continue to design games for teaching, learning, rewards, and assessment. In the last six years, I have designed and developed various educational games on different platforms include desktop computers, smartphones, and televisions to assist users learning history and culture, programming language, financial concepts, management information systems and activities of daily living, and help elders with disabilities to improve selective attentions and to gain higher quality of life as well as encouraging young females to do physical activity. All of the games have computational intelligence components built-in to provide users personalized and adaptive learning experiences. The experiments and pilots do show positive and encouraging outcome. My research finds that the students' voluntariness of using games for learning is affected by their attitudes toward the computer games; however, no effects of gender differences are found. Moreover, female students have more positive attitude and willingness toward educational games. I also pay attention on the design of learning activity rewards and their effects. I use quantitative methods to see the effectiveness of educational game rewards, the results have indicated that students have significantly much better academic achievements at the end of the course. On the other hand, I believe that implicit assessment is good for students who do not like explicit exams or who suffer from exam related stress. Therefore, I conduct research on the design of assessment games and quests. I also use qualitative research methods for analyzing the important factors of designing assessment games. Several important findings can be found in the portfolio of my academic publications. I have published 9 journal papers and 13 conference papers in this research area. In this project, the student needs to develop a virtual experiment environment in Kinect which can support (1) a student doing virtual experiments alone; (2) two students doing virtual experiments together in front of a computer (with Kinect for Windows); and, (3) two students together doing virtual experiments together in front of computers separately at different places via Internet. The research project will design the required virtual labs under different environmental parameter settings (e.g., gravity, temperature and air resistance settings on the top of mountain, in the windy day, on the Moon, etc.) and will implement the virtual experiments that AU Physics Labs provide (http://science.athabascau.ca/Labs/course-listing/physics.php). The student can learn how to design and implement Kinect application as well as data synchronizing function with HTML5 (HTML/CSS/JavaScript), AJAX, and JSP techniques. Also, the student can know how to design a pilot to gather the perception that players may have toward the game and to do usability analysis for the game. Skills of designing and evaluating a questionnaire's validity and reliability can be learnt either. For doing this project, the student is better to have the following skills or knowledge: • Familiar with Visual C# • Familiar with mySQL and SQL commands • Familiar with JSP functions • Familiar with HTML/XML, CSS, and Java Script • Information collection, re-organization, summarization, and reports • Using screen capture software and video editing software/tool to creating instructional video clips 12 May, 2015 3 August, 2015 Athabasca University – Athabasca Alberta Maiga Chang 0 0 null English Small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for high-resolution environmental remote sensing: a soil moisture case study. Successful research in environmental remote sensing relies on multiple-view approaches to data collection. In multi-stage remote sensing, data are collected at different geographic scales. Low-altitude, high-resolution aerial observations bridge the gap between in situ and satellite-based observations. These can be achieved by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), with minimum logistical support and lower operation/maintenance costs than manned aircrafts. UAVs (also known as drones) are remotely-controlled or autonomous aircrafts without a pilot aboard. UAVs are categorized according to their range of action, flight altitude, endurance, maximum takeoff weight, and type of applications. They were initially designed for military purposes, to perform reconnaissance and attack missions while reducing casualties. However, they are now deployed in a small but growing number of civil, commercial, and scientific applications. At Athabasca University, we have assembled several small UAVs, ranging from multicopters and EPP-foam airplanes with limited flight time (1 hour) and payload weight (up to 2 kg) to larger fixed-wing aircrafts with extended endurance (6+ hours) and payload capability (up to 10 kg). We are using these UAVs mainly for tracking springtime snowmelt timing and spatial patterns and monitoring the impact of climate change on permafrost landscapes in Nordic communities. But, we are also looking into demonstrating the potential of UAV-based remote sensing for further applications, including soil and vegetation mapping, aerobiological sampling of pollens and pathogens, and the monitoring of populations of free-range mammals. The Summer 2015 research project will consist in equipping one of our small UAVs with a full-spectrum (UV, visible, and near-infrared) GoPro Hero 3 camera and a “coffee-can” L-band radar (QM-RDKIT Radar, Quonset Microwave) and deploy it for obtaining soil moisture maps in low vegetation areas and under forest over an experimental acreage located 150 km west of Edmonton, Alberta. Ground-based observations of soil moisture, temperature and permittivity at 5 cm from the top soil surface will be collected with a portable, handheld device, concurrent with each flight. This information will be used to calibrate and validate a soil-moisture retrieval algorithm based on the UAV imagery. This project represent a unique opportunity for you to apply your knowledge of remote sensing while gaining new practical experience in the exciting rising field of unmanned aerial vehicles. We hope to welcome you to Athabasca University and beautiful Alberta in summer 2015! Dr. Pivot’s background and research is both in physical geography and geospatial technologies. Dr. Pivot grew up in Montpellier, France, on the shore of the Mediterranean Sea. There, she completed her undergraduate studies in Geography of Mediterranean and Tropical Regions, at University Paul Valéry. Since her early childhood, Dr. Pivot devoted great passion to Polar Regions which largely influenced her career choice and coming to Canada in the 1990s. Dr. Pivot’s graduate and post-graduate research was related to applied remote sensing, climatology/hydrology, cryospheric science, modeling and improvement of field measurement methods of cryospheric components. In 2000, Dr. Pivot received the PhD degree in Physical Analysis of Geographical Environments, Natural Resources and Risks from the University of Sciences and Technologies of Lille, France. Her thesis work focused on using multisensory data, especially active and passive microwave remotely-sensed data (ground-based and spaceborne sensors), to retrieve snow cover characteristics and monitor their spatio-temporal variability in the boreal forest-tundra ecotone of northern Manitoba, Canada. Dr. Pivot joined Athabasca University in 2006, as a full-time Assistant Professor in Physical Geography and Remote Sensing. Her specialized research areas are in: 1) Remote sensing and geoscience: developing enhanced observing systems capabilities (technology and algorithms) for monitoring the spatio-temporal dynamics of various Earth’s surface parameters and processes. Dr. Pivot is currently looking into multi-stage remote sensing approaches, using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in particular. 2) Distance education: finding technological ways to innovate the teaching and learning of physical geography online (i.e. mobile-technology guided fieldtrips and virtual geographical environments). Your role will consist in: 1) Conducting a literature review on UAV-based remote sensing techniques and soilmoisture estimations using remote sensing. 2) Participating in fieldwork and: - helping with UAV mission planning (e.g. fabrication/installation of aerial targets for georeferencing purposes, preflight inspection of the UAV systems, flight planning and simulation); - helping deploy the UAVs in the field and operate them, especially by assisting the pilot in the duties associated with collision avoidance (i.e. UAV ground observer). - helping with ground measurements of soil and vegetation properties. 3) Processing and analyzing the UAV data using the Geomatica software (PCI Geomatics), which includes tasks such as rectifying, georeferencing and mosaicking the set of overlapping UAV photos to generate composite images, gridding and filtering the radar data, calculating vegetation/soil moisture indices, pixel values extraction, and image classification. The results will be used to develop the soil moisture-retrieval algorithm and to test its capability. Skills/background in remote sensing/photogrammetry/GIS/digital image processing is required to work on this project. Experience with radio-controlled (model) aircraft and/or unmanned aerial vehicles is an asset, but not a requirement as training will be provided during the internship. Applications are welcome from all areas of geo- and environmental sciences as well as geomatics or geoinformatics; however, preference will be given to students with background in physical geography. 15 May, 2015 15 August, 2015 University of Alberta – Edmonton Alberta Frederique Pivot 0 0 null English Identifying novel translational repressors that promote stress granules and associated chemoresistance In cancer, exposure of patients to chemical or radiation treatment can induce cancer cell to mobilize a defense mechanism. This allows cancer cells to resist treatment and grow. The resistance of cancer cells is one of the major obstacles in treating patients suffering from cancer. Our research activity aims to understand the mechanisms involved in cell’s chemo and radioresistance. More specifically, the focus of this research is to decipher one key defense mechanism that was recently uncovered and involving the formation of stress granules (SG). SG are cytoplasmic RNA multimolecular bodies where translation initiation factors (eIFs), RNA binding proteins and signaling molecules are entrapped. SG are known to inhibit efficiently apoptotic pathways thus leading to chemo- and radioresistance in tumor cells. However, the mechanisms by which SG are formed in cancer cells are still largely unknown. Our aim is to define one of the critical mechanisms involved in the formation of SG in response to anti-cancer treatment, which can be targeted to prevent associated chemoresistance. We have previously described the formation of SG in cancer cells induced by proteasome inhibitors MG132 and lactacystin, and more recently with bortezomib (Velcade®) (Mazroui et al MBC 2007; Fournier et al Cancer Cell Intern 2010). This FDA approved drug is efficient for the treatment of myelomas and other haematological tumors. Solid tumors are however refractory to proteasome inhibitors and I observed that this chemoresistance of cancer cells may be associated with the formation of SG (Fournier et al Cancer Cell Intern 2010; Gareau et al Plos One 2011). Our recent investigations of the mechanisms of SG formation identified the translation initiation and oncogenic eIF4E-4GI complexes as key promoters of SG formation following bortezomib treatment (Fournier et al MCB 2013). This formation of SG is relevant to bortezomib resistance since its suppression by disrupting eIF4E-4GI complexes synergizes bortezomib-mediated apoptosis. Further investigations of the mechanisms by which eIF4E-4GI complexes promote formation of SG identified specific translational repressors that drive SG formation by interacting with eIF4E-4GI complexes. The aim of this research project is thus to define how the identified translational repressors interact with eIF4E-4GI complexes to promote SG formation. This will be achieved by combining mutagenesis and immunoprecipitation assays using specific antibodies. Using these approaches, we expect to map the interactions between the identified factors and eIF4E-4GI complexes, which can then be targeted to prevent SG formation and associated chemoresistance. Therefore, drugs abrogating the association between the identified factors and eIF4E-4GI complexes, and thus SG are expected to reduce significantly the incidence of chemo- (radio)resistance observed when using conventional cancer therapy. My research focuses on defining how cytoplasmic Stress Granules (SG) form and inhibit apoptotic pathways leading to the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. With these goals, we started our independent investigations in 2008 by establishing a direct link between the mechanisms of SG formation and the activity of translation initiation factors (Mokas et al; Molecular Biology of the Cell 2009), opening new areas of investigations to determine oncogenic translation pathways that can be targeted to prevent the formation of SG and its associated chemoresistance. To this end, we established a cancer cell model providing a first glimpse of the role SG in tumor cells resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug named bortezomib (Fournier et al., Cancer Cell Inter 2010), which involves upregulation of antiapoptotic factor p21 via CUGBP1 (Gareau et al., Plos ONE). Investigating the underlying mechanism by which the SG downstream CUGBP1-p21 pathway prevents bortezomib-mediated apoptosis is currently under investigation. Nevertheless, our recent pilot study (Fournier et al., Molecular and Cellular Biology 2013) now identified the oncogenic translation initiation eIF4E-eIF4GI complexes as key promoters of SG formation in cancer cells treated with bortezomib. Importantly, this pilot study shows that targeting eIF4E-4GI complexes sensitizes cancer cells to proteasome inhibitors, in part by suppressing SG formation and associated p21 upregulation. Recent data indicate that the underlying mechanism by which eIF4E-4GI complexes drive SG formation and associated resistance to proteasome inhibitors involves eIF4GI interaction with specific translational repressors. We anticipate that targeting the latter specific interactions to disrupt SG formation may provide novel strategies to prevent cancer cell resistance to conventional chemotherapeutics. L'étudiant sera en charge de produire des constructions ADN codant pour des versions mutantes de protéines pour ensuite les utiliser dans des tests d'interaction Rigueur scientifique et aptitude à apprendre vite Expérience en biochimie et en biologie moléculaire est souhaitée 1 May, 2015 30 August, 2015 Université Laval – Québec City Québec Rachid Mazroui 0 0 null English A Knowledge Management System for Knowledge-Intensive SMEs Knowledge-intensive enterprises (KIE) play an important role in the knowledge-based economy (OECD, 2007). Knowledge-intensive enterprises can be loosely and preliminary defined as organizations that offer to the market the use of fairly sophisticated knowledge or knowledge-based products and services (Doloreux Shearmur, 2011). Knowledge management is important for both large enterprises and small and medium-size enterprises (SME). As a matter of fact, many topics related to knowledge management in SMEs have not been well studied yet (Durst Edvardsson, 2012). Given the importance of effective knowledge management in knowledgeintensive SMEs (KI-SME), there is a special need for a project on this topic applied for SMEs. An appropriate knowledge management framework for KI-SMEs may help them to manage their business activities effectively, to improve their performance and innovation capacity, and also contribute to the development of the economy as a whole. The key focus of this project is to build an intranet-based knowledge management system based on an open-source content management platform so that SMEs could reuse and enhance this system as their solution at lower costs. Further, we intend to experiment our system with some specific knowledge-intensive industries in the fields of business, research and development, educational and health-care services. During my academic career, I have worked in the areas of Information Systems, Database, Software Engineering and Service science. My specific research interests are to provide a knowledge-based information architecture for supporting management and interoperability of information and service systems. In my PhD research, I proposed a conceptual framework for building and managing the Information System upon Information Systems (ISIS). The purpose of the ISIS is to provide a knowledge-based infrastructure supporting management and interoperability of information systems based on conceptual schemas. For the time being, my primary research interest focuses primarily on knowledge management, knowledge-intensive services, and enterprise development and management in the knowledge-based economy. My recent research focuses on proposing a conceptual framework for supporting the management, the science and the engineering of information and service systems at a global level. My current work is to apply the framework for promoting the digital transformation of knowledge-based organizations, especially in the areas of higher education, RD, networked enterprises, project management, and internationalization. The objective of this work is to propose an integrated framework that helps knowledge-intensive organizations in managing their knowledge and building their knowledge infrastructure efficiently and flexibly at lower cost. My work has been previously presented in several information system conferences and journals such as conferences organized by AIS (ECIS, HICSS), ACM and IEEE as well as journals published by Springer, IGI Global, Emerald et InderScience. Currently, I am the founder and co-director of LARIDEPED (Laboratory for Enterprise Development in Developing Countries) at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières (UQTR), Canada. • Develop, code, test and troubleshoot the system • Analyze and identify system issues and recommend system enhancements or fixes • Manage and participate in new features development • Write technical reports • Write user guide for the system • Pack the finished software product • Knowledge of OOP, SDLC, MVC, Web services, and Software Architecture . Experience with web developing applications . Front-end development: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery, PHP and MYSQL . Knowledge about open-source content management systems, especially those based on PHP and MySQL such as Drupal, Joomla or Wordpress. • Excellent communication skills, both verbal and written • Detail-oriented with the ability to produce high quality software within given timelines 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 Université du Québec à Trois–Rivières – Trois–Rivières Québec Thang Le Dinh 0 0 null English Cyber-infrastructure System for Social Science Research Collaboration in Higher-Education Research collaboration in a globalized world has become one of the most important challenges for higher-education today. In social science research, there is a special need for more collaboration between researchers all over the world, especially between the researchers in developing countries and those in developed countries. As a matter of fact, research collaboration is still an intricate and difficult challenge. The focus of the project is a cyber-infrastructure system to support the collaboration among researchers across institutions in social science research that is called cyber- infrastructure for social science research collaboration (SSRC). To promote collaboration among researchers over the world, cyber-infrastructure, or e-science, was introduced recently. The term e-science evolved as a new research field that focuses on collaboration in key areas of science using next generation computing infrastructures to extend the potential of scientific computing. The cyber-infrastructure for social science research collaboration will be the application of the service science perspective on e-science. Service science, or Service Science, Management, and Engineering (SSME), is a term used to describe a science that encompasses all the aspects that relate to business services and their life cycles. SSME is comprised of three fundamental elements: science, management and engineering. The management element aims at adding more value to existing services and providing new innovative services. The science element aims at defining the structure of service systems and clarifying the process of service creation. The engineering element aims at covering the invention of new technologies for improving the quality of services. This proposed project aims at building a cyber-infrastructure system for a university at a developed country that intends to delocalize its MBA program with research thesis option to developing countries. During my academic career, I have worked in the areas of Information Systems, Database, Software Engineering and Service science. My specific research interests are to provide a knowledge-based information architecture for supporting management and interoperability of information and service systems. In my PhD research, I proposed a conceptual framework for building and managing the Information System upon Information Systems (ISIS). The purpose of the ISIS is to provide a knowledge-based infrastructure supporting management and interoperability of information systems based on conceptual schemas. For the time being, my primary research interest focuses primarily on knowledge management, knowledge-intensive services, and enterprise development and management in the knowledge-based economy. My recent research focuses on proposing a conceptual framework for supporting the management, the science and the engineering of information and service systems at a global level. My current work is to apply the framework for promoting the digital transformation of knowledge-based organizations, especially in the areas of higher education, RD, networked enterprises, project management, and internationalization. The objective of this work is to propose an integrated framework that helps knowledge-intensive organizations in managing their knowledge and building their knowledge infrastructure efficiently and flexibly at lower cost. My work has been previously presented in several information system conferences and journals such as conferences organized by AIS (ECIS, HICSS), ACM and IEEE as well as journals published by Springer, IGI Global, Emerald et InderScience. Currently, I am the founder and co-director of LARIDEPED (Laboratory for Enterprise Development in Developing Countries) at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières (UQTR), Canada. • Develop, code, test and troubleshoot the system • Analyze and identify system issues and recommend system enhancements or fixes • Manage and participate in new features development • Write technical reports • Write user guide for the system • Pack the finished software product • Knowledge of OOP, SDLC, MVC, Web services, and Software Architecture . Experience with web developing applications . Front-end development: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery, PHP and MYSQL . Knowledge about open-source content management systems, especially those based on PHP and MySQL such as Drupal, Joomla or Wordpress. • Excellent communication skills, both verbal and written • Detail-oriented with the ability to produce high quality software within given timelines 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 Université du Québec à Trois–Rivières – Trois–Rivières Québec Thang Le Dinh 0 0 null English Structural and Functional Investigation of Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) The research project involves investigating the structure and function of DISC1 subdomains. As DISC1 is a large protein with multiple functions, breaking it down into its subdomains will facilitate our understanding of its biology. The biochemical and biophysical properties of subdomains will be characterized. This 12-week project will allow the student to learn how to use a state-of-the-art protein chromatography system to produce large quantity of proteins needed for downstream structural biological investigation. The student will start working on purifying a protein construct that has been optimized in our lab in order to learn all the basic techniques involved. Then the student will have the opportunity to design and perform molecular cloning of a novel protein construct from scratch. In the process, the student will also learn the various protein designing strategies that structural biologists frequently employ. Neuropsychiatric diseases pose a great burden to our society. Current treatments are limited by poor efficacy and undesirable side effects. However, new treatments are hampered by the complexity and multifaceted nature of these diseases. Human genetic research in the field of psychiatry has uncovered a number of candidate genes that are implicated in brain functions. The focus of my laboratory is to understand the molecular mechanisms of these candidate genes in neuronal functions. We are currently interested in Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), which is one of the strongest risk genes that are linked to autism and several major mental disorders including schizophrenia, major depression, and bipolar disorder. The DISC1 protein functions in many cellular functions by interacting with multiple protein partners, affecting neurogenesis, neural progenitor proliferation, and neural migration. How does one protein manage to affect such a diverse spectrum of brain functions? My lab takes a multidisciplinary and integrative approach to study DISC1 biology using structural biology, neuronal cell culture, and Drosophila genetics. While structural biology provides a three-dimensional atomic arrangement of the protein that will shed light on the detailed molecular mechanisms, Drosophila genetics allow studying the protein function at the level of neural circuitry and behaviour of the whole organisms. Linking these approaches, we will also perform investigation in cell culture that will tell us about the protein function at the cellular level. Working with such an interesting but complicating protein that has multiple functions and binding partners, this integrative experimental approach using diverse techniques from biochemistry to behavioural genetics will promote novel and unique knowledge to be discovered. The student is expected to learn the essential skills and perform experiments independently with guidance directly from me. He/she will have the opportunity to experience the interactive and stimulating environment of an academic research setting by interacting with other members of the research cluster. In addition to performing experiments, the student will be asked to participate in weekly group meetings and maintain a notebook that documents his/her daily activity. The student is expected to understand basic molecular biology and biochemistry. Practical experience is beneficial but the student will rapidly gain hands-on experience as the research progress. Computer skills will be a bonus if the student is interested to also learn the process of determining crystal structures. 1 June, 2015 1 September, 2015 University of Saskatchewan – Saskatoon Saskatchewan Adelaine Leung 0 0 null English Evaluating the Accessibility of the Manitoban Construction Industry to Physically Disabled Construction Workers and its Relation The goal of this study is to investigate the accessibility of the Manitoban construction industry’s accessibility from a disability management perspective and its relation to safety performance. The research aims more specifically to develop and apply a model that would evaluate the maturity of the local industry’s disability management practices and investigate the relationship between the maturity of these practices and its actual disability management and safety performance. The model will aim to evaluate disability management from a managerial perspective; it will focus on physical disability in particular and will target general contractors focusing on building work specifically. The model will be applied to five local construction companies in order to validate it. This research is expected to provide a tool that construction organizations can use to measure disability management using leading indicators of performance and forecast how well a company is expected to perform with respect to disability management. This is also a tool that can be used in a regulator capacity by the WCB and other regulatory bodies for auditing and evaluation purposes. It is expected to enable a better understanding of the relationship between improved disability management practices and improved safety performance. Should this relationship be proven, it would make the case for the need to better integrate disabled workers in the workplace to improve its safety, lower the rate of injuries and fatalities and by extension decrease costs borne by industry stakeholders and the WCB. Plans will be made to publish the results of the research in scientific journals and present them at national and international conferences. The research will also involve targeting local and national industry conferences and connecting with local associations to disseminate the findings to industry stakeholders. Research in the Construction Engineering and Management group that I lead encompasses three main areas: Sustainability in Construction, ICT in Construction and Construction Health and Safety Management. Sustainability in Construction Research in this area focuses on the whole life appraisal and post occupancy evaluation of green buildings in-use in Canada. The objectives of this research include: 1) evaluating the economic performance of existing green buildings 2) evaluating their environmental performance and 3) investigating occupant satisfaction, behaviour, and use of green buildings. Other goals involve evaluating existing green building assessment tools and green building education and training to improve the skillset of new entrants and existing practitioners. ICT in Construction Research in this area focuses on the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to improve collaborative working in the construction industry. Specific objectives include 1) developing evaluation models for collaborative decision-making in the industry 2) Establishing benchmarks for effective group meetings and collaborative decisions, and 3) investigating the effects of ICT use on the effectiveness of collaborative decision-making. Construction Health and Safety Management Research in this area focuses on assessing occupational health and safety management with the aim of improving health and safety performance in the construction industry. The objectives of this research involve 1) developing evaluation models and benchmarks for health and safety management practices and performance at the industry, organizational and project levels 2) investigating the relationship between management and performance and 3) evaluating health and safety education and training to improve health and safety management. The student will be responsible for helping with the data collection phase of the project. This data includes quantitative and qualitative accessibility and safety data collected for five construction companies in Manitoba. The student will be responsible for helping with developing data collection forms, questionnaires, and interviews and with the administration of these. The student may be involved in analyzing some of that data. The student will be working closely with a graduate student on this research and supervised by the faculty member throughout the whole internship. The successful applicant should be pursuing a degree in civil engineering or a related field and have an interest in the field of health and safety and/or disability management in the construction industry. Previous research experience would be an asset, but not a requirement for the position. 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 University of Manitoba – Winnipeg Manitoba Mohamed Issa 0 0 null English Measuring the Indoor Environmental Quality of Office Buildings and its Impact on Worker Productivity Office workers spend significant amount of time in offices working averagely 8 hours per day and 5 days per week. Their interaction with variables of office indoor environment such as air temperature and carbon dioxide concentration will undoubtedly affect their general satisfaction and work performance. This project aims to conduct post-occupancy evaluations of existing office buildings, focusing on indoor environmental quality in these office buildings and their relationship with organizational productivity and workers’ performance. Research methods involve using a mobile cart of instruments to measure various indoor environmental quality parameters such as temperature, air speed, humidity, light level, noise level, concentration of various gases, and a count of airborne particulates at various workstations across the building. These will be correlated with organizational productivity data; the ultimate aim being to incorporate knowledge derived from the study into the design and project management solutions and services offered to clients. The research will develop simple evaluation protocols that business clients can use to conduct routine post-occupancy evaluations of their indoor environments, thereby enabling new business opportunities and thus improving their business competitiveness. Research in the Construction Engineering and Management group that I lead encompasses three main areas: Sustainability in Construction, ICT in Construction and Construction Health and Safety Management. Sustainability in Construction Research in this area focuses on the whole life appraisal and post occupancy evaluation of green buildings in-use in Canada. The objectives of this research include: 1) evaluating the economic performance of existing green buildings 2) evaluating their environmental performance and 3) investigating occupant satisfaction, behaviour, and use of green buildings. Other goals involve evaluating existing green building assessment tools and green building education and training to improve the skillset of new entrants and existing practitioners. ICT in Construction Research in this area focuses on the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to improve collaborative working in the construction industry. Specific objectives include 1) developing evaluation models for collaborative decision-making in the industry 2) Establishing benchmarks for effective group meetings and collaborative decisions, and 3) investigating the effects of ICT use on the effectiveness of collaborative decision-making. Construction Health and Safety Management Research in this area focuses on assessing occupational health and safety management with the aim of improving health and safety performance in the construction industry. The objectives of this research involve 1) developing evaluation models and benchmarks for health and safety management practices and performance at the industry, organizational and project levels 2) investigating the relationship between management and performance and 3) evaluating health and safety education and training to improve health and safety management. The student will be responsible for helping with the analysis of the data collected for this research. This data includes quantitative and qualitative indoor environmental quality and productivity data collected for four office buildings. The student will also be responsible for helping with reporting the results of the data analysis and its dissemination if needed. The student will be working closely with a graduate student on this research and supervised by the faculty member throughout the whole internship. The successful applicant should be pursuing a degree in civil engineering or a related field and have an interest in the field of building performance evaluation. Previous research experience would be an asset, but not a requirement for the position. 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 University of Manitoba – Winnipeg Manitoba Mohamed Issa 0 1 Stantec Winnipeg English Post-Occupancy Evaluation of Energy Consumption in LEED School Buildings in Manitoba Over the past decade, the green building industry evolved into a robust movement promoting high performance and energy efficient buildings. Governments and municipalities were also fostering new green projects due to their energy reduction potential. In some cases, green buildings realized anticipated energy savings and even exceeded them at times. However, several studies demonstrated how some green buildings don’t perform as expected. While many factors may contribute to this outcome, building occupancy and usage may have an effect on buildings’ energy consumption. Only few studies investigated the role of occupancy and usage on energy consumption mostly through qualitative assessment. This research investigates the effect of occupancy and usage on energy consumption in Manitoba’s public schools highlighting the performance of new, especially green schools, in comparison with middle-aged and older schools in the province. The research entails developing protocols for evaluating energy consumption, occupancy and usage where detailed investigation of occupancy and usage will be correlated to energy consumption. The research will also include installing data loggers, plug monitors as well as occupancy sensors in order to monitor the effect of occupancy and usage on energy consumption inside school spaces. It also includes using surveys and visual observations to document occupants’ energy-related activities. Furthermore, this research will investigate the effect of providing energy use feedback to occupants on buildings’ energy consumption over time. Overall, this research will provide a detailed analysis of energy consumption in a sample of Manitoba’s schools which restricts its results to one geographical location. In addition, the detailed space-level analysis of usage and energy consumption will only be implemented at a small number of schools, making it difficult to generalize its results to other schools. On the other hand, the results of this research will provide empirical evidence for the effect of occupancy and usage on schools’ energy performance. It will also highlight best practices to promote energy-efficient usage in schools. Finally, this research presents significant contributions to the body of knowledge in the form of detailed protocols for evaluating energy, occupancy and usage in school buildings. Research in the Construction Engineering and Management group that I lead encompasses three main areas: Sustainability in Construction, ICT in Construction and Construction Health and Safety Management. Sustainability in Construction Research in this area focuses on the whole life appraisal and post occupancy evaluation of green buildings in-use in Canada. The objectives of this research include: 1) evaluating the economic performance of existing green buildings 2) evaluating their environmental performance and 3) investigating occupant satisfaction, behaviour, and use of green buildings. Other goals involve evaluating existing green building assessment tools and green building education and training to improve the skillset of new entrants and existing practitioners. ICT in Construction Research in this area focuses on the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to improve collaborative working in the construction industry. Specific objectives include 1) developing evaluation models for collaborative decision-making in the industry 2) Establishing benchmarks for effective group meetings and collaborative decisions, and 3) investigating the effects of ICT use on the effectiveness of collaborative decision-making. Construction Health and Safety Management Research in this area focuses on assessing occupational health and safety management with the aim of improving health and safety performance in the construction industry. The objectives of this research involve 1) developing evaluation models and benchmarks for health and safety management practices and performance at the industry, organizational and project levels 2) investigating the relationship between management and performance and 3) evaluating health and safety education and training to improve health and safety management. The student will be responsible for helping with the analysis of the data collected for this research. This data includes quantitative and qualitative energy, usage and occupancy data collected for over 30 buildings at the building and space levels. The student will also be responsible for helping with reporting the results of the data analysis and its dissemination if needed. The student will be working closely with a graduate student on this research and supervised by the faculty member throughout the whole internship. The successful applicant should be pursuing a degree in civil engineering or a related field and have an interest in the field of green building/ sustainability. Previous research experience would be an asset, but not a requirement for the position. 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 University of Manitoba – Winnipeg Manitoba Mohamed Issa 0 1 null English Design and Control of a Combination Wheelchair and Lower-limb Orthosis This rehabilitation engineering research project, called COMBO, is a collaboration between BCIT and UBC. It addresses the inadequacy of existing powered exoskeletons designed for people with a mobility impairment. Powered walking exoskeletons enable highly desired standing and walking functions (e.g., for people with spinal cord injury), as well as providing therapeutic benefits associated with rehabilitation gait training. Some of these therapeutic benefits include improvements to spasticity, bone density and body composition, and autonomic functions. Currently available exoskeletons have significant imitations, such as slow speed, limited range, potential skin issues, and difficult transfers. These issues may be addressable with a new mobility concept under development that entails docking a detachable exoskeleton to a wheeled frame. This new integrated concept creates a device, that in its most common state, is analogous to a wheelchair with dynamic positioning capabilities (e.g., by using the exoskeleton frame and actuators as a moveable wheelchair seat). At the same time, the device also offers the option to stand and detach from the wheels to become a powered walking exoskeleton. Thus, the benefits of both wheelchairs and exoskeletons may be realized. In the CARIS lab, we pursue world-class experimental research to advance the science of robots that interact with humans. Our research areas are human-robot interaction, robot vision, standing balance and therapy robotics. All this research is highly interdisciplinary, often intertwined with the fields of cognitive and social sciences, neurophysiology, physical therapy and others. Our researchers are a hard-working and social bunch. We regularly publish in top robotics conferences including IEEE International Conference on Robotics Automation and the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems, and in top biomedical journals/conferences such as the IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, the International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics and the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference. In the summer, our lab has its annual barbeque and retreat (past retreats include hiking to the Chief in Squamish and enjoying a waterpark), and our members often organize their own gatherings such as hiking, playing beach volleyball or enjoying Vancouver's diverse cuisines. The CARIS lab is a research group within the Mechanical Engineering Department of the University of British Columbia (UBC), one of Canada's leading research universities that is consistently ranked among the top 40 in the world. We are located in UBC's Vancouver campus, 30 minutes west of downtown Vancouver. As Canada's third most populous metropolitan area and the world's third most-livable city, Vancouver is a city that has it all. The city has amazing access to both urban and outdoor activities, an excellent local transportation system, and beautiful temperature weather absent of extreme heat or cold. More information about our lab can be found at http://caris.mech.ubc.ca. The work will involve the simulation and analysis of candidate designs for the first-generation of COMBO, based on work done to-date on the project by the investigators and graduate students. The applicant will be involved in modifying and/or creating detailed designs of components and subassemblies, which may involve several visits to BCIT in Vancouver. The applicant will also be assisting in the pilot testing of candidate designs in the ICORD motion capture lab. The applicant will generally have a background in mechatronics and/or biomechanical engineering. A solid understanding of dynamics, kinematics and robotics principles is essential, and an understanding of controls is desirable. Knowledge of machine elements and mechanism design is highly desirable. The applicant will be working primarily with simulation/design tools such as Matlab/SImulink, OpenSim, ROS-Gazebo and SolidWorks. Familiarity with some of these, as well as more general languages such as C++, is essential. 1 May, 2015 1 August, 2015 University of British Columbia – Vancouver British Columbia Mike Van der Loos 0 0 null English Improvements in the Control of a Virtual Reality Robotic Balance Simulator Standing balance in humans is controlled by several inputs, including vision, vestibular sense, and ankle proprioception. Research studies in this field actively engage and manipulate these input mechanisms to examine their effects on the balance output, mainly actuation of the calf muscles. While significant progress has been made, it is often difficult to isolate a single input and test its results on the output. Our "Robot for Interactive Sensor Engagement and Rehabilitation" (RISER) has been developed in the CARIS Laboratory to control each sense independently to further our understanding of human balance control. We have also started to examine impaired balance in persons post-stroke and are are designing strategies to help safely rehabilitate people who have lost the ability to balance safely. RISER uses a unique approach to examining the human balance system: subjects engage in a standing balance motion simulator that controls the subject's body and ankle motion using a six-axis Stewart platform and one-axis foot platform based on ankle torque feedback from force plates. The subjects are secured to the platforms, so they cannot move independently of them. The forces that the subject applies to the force plate are fed back to the controller, creating a simulation of standing balance in which the subject has no risk of falling. Immersive 3D stereo display goggles provide visual balance cues, and galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) can be employed to produce vestibular input. So far, RISER controls balance only in the anterior-posterior direction. In the current phase of work, we are implementing a new component onto RISER. This is a motorized backrest to control medio-lateral postural changes at the level of the pelvis. We will integrate this additional feature to include correction of medio-lateral asymmetry into the training of symmetry of foot forces in stance. These developments will be performed in close collaboration between the therapy community, clinicians, and engineers. In the CARIS lab, we pursue world-class experimental research to advance the science of robots that interact with humans. Our research areas are human-robot interaction, robot vision, standing balance and therapy robotics. All this research is highly interdisciplinary, often intertwined with the fields of cognitive and social sciences, neurophysiology, physical therapy and others. Our researchers are a hard-working and social bunch. We regularly publish in top robotics conferences including IEEE International Conference on Robotics Automation and the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems, and in top biomedical journals/conferences such as the IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, the International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics and the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference. In the summer, our lab has its annual barbeque and retreat (past retreats include hiking to the Chief in Squamish and enjoying a waterpark), and our members often organize their own gatherings such as hiking, playing beach volleyball or enjoying Vancouver's diverse cuisines. The CARIS lab is a research group within the Mechanical Engineering Department of the University of British Columbia (UBC), one of Canada's leading research universities that is consistently ranked among the top 40 in the world. We are located in UBC's Vancouver campus, 30 minutes west of downtown Vancouver. As Canada's third most populous metropolitan area and the world's third most-livable city, Vancouver is a city that has it all. The city has amazing access to both urban and outdoor activities, an excellent local transportation system, and beautiful temperature weather absent of extreme heat or cold. More information about our lab can be found at http://caris.mech.ubc.ca. The applicant will be involved in assisting in the simulation of, the control of, and the detailed design of the motorized backrest to control medio-lateral postural changes at the level of the pelvis. Work will also include integration with the LabVIEW-based control program. The applicant will generally have a background in mechatronics and/or biomechanical engineering. A solid base of dynamics, kinematics, robotics and controls principles is desirable. Knowledge of machine elements and mechanism design is highly desirable. The applicant will be working primarily with simulation/design tools such as MATLAB/Simulink and SolidWorks. Real-time programming experience of mechatronic systems is essential, preferably using the NI-PXI real-time platform with LabVIEW. 1 May, 2015 1 August, 2015 University of British Columbia – Vancouver British Columbia Mike Van der Loos 0 0 null English Looking for clues to onset of Asian desertification and Tibetan Plateau uplift Timing of the initiation of Asian desertification is a contentious topic in paleoclimatology because it enables us to decipher both global and regional environmental changes. Late Cenozoic wind-blown red clay sequences on the Chinese Loess Plateau, which possess abundant paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental information, can be regarded as an excellent indicator of inland Asia desertification. It is calmed that typical eolian red clay appears as early as 25 Ma. This extends the lower limit of the red clay on the Chinese Loess Plateau from the previously thought early Miocene back into the late Oligocene. These sequences provide a unique high-resolution geological record for understanding the inland Asia desertification process since the late Oligocene. At the same time, our group recent study indicates that the accelerating uplift of the Tibetan Plateau influences the paleoclimatic response of the climate proxy variables as well as the orbital forcing. We suggest that using both cyclostratigraphy along with magnetostratigaphy gives us the effective and valid outcome for dating red clay sequences and it also implies that many presently published age models for the red clay should probably be re-evaluated. Magnetostratigraphy studies polarity change registered in the geological sections and drilling cores. Polarity change is a global phenomenon which occurs simultaneously all over the world. The normal / reverse polarity sequence is well known for Cenozoic Era and can be used for dating the sediments and geological events. Cyclostratigraphy is the study of astronomically forced climate cycles within sedimentary successions and can be used as another independent dating tool. Approach of our study may be instrumental to contribute to improvement of our understanding of the Asian monsoon system as an important part of the global climate model. During the project execution the student will bring red clay samples from China to Canada in order to perform laboratory measurement and analyze the data for sedimentary sequence dating using both techniques, magnetostratigraphy and cyclostratigraphy. I study paleomagnetism and climate change. Paleomagnetism studies the past geomagnetic field recorded in rocks and sediments (Kravchinsky, 2014, Geomagnetism, Springer). Since the magnetic minerals are abundant in the Earth's crust, paleomagnetic studies can be applied to a wide range of rocks and sediments. During sediment formation, the magnetic grains align themselves with the local magnetic field until they become locked into place. The acquired magnetization is called a remnant magnetization and can be described by its inclination, declination, and intensity. The direction of the ancient magnetic field has been continuously registered in the mid-ocean ridges when the erupted magma cools down. It enables one to study the geomagnetic polarity reversals, i.e., when the Earth dipolar field reverses 180° relatively to the present-day orientation. Such reversals are common throughout Earth's entire geological history. The most recent polarity reversal occurred at ~780,000 years ago (Brunhes-Matuyama reversal). The polarity change pattern is studied by magnetostratigraphy and can be used for stratigraphic correlation and dating of the geological section separated from meters to thousands of kilometers. Creating a universal reference scale of polarity changes using biostratigraphic and radiometric ages produces the geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS). This scale provides valuable stratigraphic markers for short and long-range correlations of geological sections. Another field of my research is paleoclimatology. I use a variety of proxy methods from the Earth sciences to obtain data previously preserved within sediments. Studies of past changes in the environment and biodiversity often reflect on the current situation, and specifically the impact of climate on evolution and biotic recovery. The student will perform measurements of the red clay sediments from China in the paleomagnetic laboratory of the University of Alberta under my supervision. After completing thermal and alternating field demagnetization experiments, the data will be processed and analyzed. Normal and reverse polarity intervals will be identified in order to build a magnetostratigraphic section and age model of the red clay section. Magnetic susceptibility measurements will be also performed in Alberta; they will be used to model the climate variations in the past in order to build a cyclostratigraphic model of the study section. Student will learn both laboratory measurements and data analysis while working in Alberta. The student should have a solid background in the earth sciences, geology or geophysics. Basic understanding of paleomagnetic data processing and familiarity with theory and application of magnetic methods is considered an asset. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of Alberta – Edmonton Alberta Vadim Kravchinsky 0 0 null English Molecular genetic study of the reproductive system development in C. elegans This project will utilize a cutting-edge polymorphism-based mapping technique to facilitate molecular analysis of Muv genes. Our laboratory has played a leading role in identifying polymorphisms and establishing the mapping technique. In 2010 we published a study (Koboldt et al. 2010, BMC Genomics) describing roughly 25,000 unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertions-deletions (indels). These natural variations serve as a useful resource in genetic mapping applications. In a related study (Zhao et al. 2010, Genetics) we used a SNP-chip approach to rapidly clone candidate genes that are linked to mutant phenotypes. Muv genes will be prioritized for further study based on their molecular identity. The student will focus on one of the genes for molecular genetic anlysis. Experiments will include determining in vivo gene expression pattern during development. For this, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique will be used to clone enhancer/promoter region of the gene in a plasmid that carries a reporter gene such as green fluorescent protein (GFP). Transgenic worms carrying the plasmid will be generated by microinjection technique already established in our laboratory. Depending upon the time the student will also perform genetic interaction and function experiments using mutants and RNA interference (RNAi) approaches. The above set of techniques will expose the trainee to a wide range of important genetics, molecular biology, transgenics and microscopy techniques. The acquired skills will enable the trainee to succeed in academic as well as professional environments. The work experience in my laboratory will inspire critical thinking, team work, and strengthen communication skills, which in turn will increase the awareness of the relevance and importance of research work in finding medical treatments (e.g., cancer) to improve human health. C. elegans is used as a model organism to gain an understanding of developmental processes and diseases. Decades of study in this organism have led to the discovery and analysis of a multitude of genes implicated in diverse processes in humans. One of its best-studied features is the development of the vulva. The C. elegans vulva is necessary for egg-laying and mating. Its robust development makes it an excellent paradigm for comparing biological mechanisms and understanding evolutionary changes between nematode species. C. briggsae, a species related to C. elegans, has been used frequently in comparative analysis of vulva formation. Work in our laboratory, as well as others, has shown that although C. elegans and C. briggsae have a similar looking vulval morphology, there are some interesting differences in characteristics such as vulval precursor induction, generation of vulval progeny, and reproductive efficiency. Therefore, a comparative approach to understanding the mechanism of vulva formation in these two species promises to offer insights into the divergence of gene function and signaling pathways that control organ formation and development of homologous structures. Our laboratory had earlier carried out forward genetic screens to isolate mutations that affect vulval development. Current work focuses on a specific class of mutations, known as multi-vulva (Muv), that cause excessive proliferation of vulval precursor cells. Such worms carry extra vulval progeny leading to multiple ventral protrusions that are visible under a stereo microscope. Since Muv genes control cell division (acting as tumor suppressors), understanding their mechanism of function promises to advance the field of cancer biology, ultimately aiding in the development of more effective cures to treat cancers. The student will have the opportunity to design and perform experiments and analyze data. They will be provided with protocols, background materials and necessary reagents to succeed in the project. Senior students in the laboratory will be available to offer guidance. The student will be working in a team environment which fosters collaboration and ample learning opportunities. It is expected that the student will present work progress in weekly lab meetings that offer informal way to discuss results and wider discussion on the significance of the data. In addition to the work, the student may also be involved in other lab activities such as reviewing literature, preparing media and solutions. All of this will ultimately make them a responsible and well-trained lab citizen. Prospective student should have taken basic courses in areas related to Genetics and Molecular Biology. Project related study materials will be provided and discussed in detail at the time of starting experiments. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 McMaster University – Hamilton Ontario Bhagwati Gupta 1 0 null English Dark Matter search with the PICO superheated liquid detectors Superheated liquids are described by their thermodynamic properties. Often, when new ground is broken with a novel type of experimental technique, the first steps of a breakthrough measurement start in a library. For experiments with superheated liquid the violent nature of the explosions, or nucleations also makes it difficult to perform experiments in an ordinary laboratory environment. For the PICO experiment, we have constructed a small, safe system that allows easy and quick measurements of the properties of superheated liquids that will need to be well understood for the planned, large PICO 250 detector. The students working on this project will be working with a test setup in the low background counting laboratory at the University of Alberta. They will be analyzing data from this setup and from the prototype detectors currently operating at SNOLAB in Sudbury, Ontario. The detection of the particle properties of dark matter is one of the most pressing open questions of particle physics. Dark matter has been first indirectly observed in the 1930s, and to this date no complete explanation of the observed mass distributions in galaxies and galaxy clusters has been found. From a particle physics perspective, more troubling is that there is no convincing particle candidate that theory has put forward. To resolve this long standing puzzle, experiments with different techniques and target materials are being performed all around the world in laboratories deep underground. I am looking for dark matter using superheated liquids that are sensitive to spin-dependent interactions. Keeping large bodies of highly superheated liquid in operation for long periods of time is a new achievement that requires technology from the past, building on the experience of large bubble chambers that were cutting edge technology in the 1960s and low background techniques that were developed only recently for low background neutrino experiments. The PICO collaboration has constructed several chambers filled with different liquids to study what choice of target material will provide the lowest background and therefore the largest sensitivity for future dark matter searches. My group at the University of Alberta is responsible for several components of the upcoming large PICO 250 detector that will be constructed at SNOLAB in the coming years. In order to optimize some aspects of the design and operational parameters of the new detector system need to be experimentally determined. This is an aspect of the research into dark matter detection with superheated liquids that provides many opportunities for short term researchers in a field that normally requires a lot of patience. The student will work with my group to answer the experimental questions pertinent to the research work at the time of the start of the project. A training on the job will be provided for the operation of existing equipment and the analysis of experimental data. The student will present his or her work in the framework of the experimental particle astrophysics research group. The student will be part of the international PICO research efforts. It is expected that the student will document and share the outcomes of the performed research with the local group and the international collaboration in phone conference calls. A good applicant for this position has worked with a programming language, like C++ or python already and ideally has worked with the root (root.cern.ch) data analysis framework already. Prior experience in a research laboratory environment is clearly an asset. Familiarity with UNIX computers and systems is highly desirable. The data analysis makes use of high performance computing clusters. If the student has used or programmed such systems, it would be an advantage. The physics background expected to fill this position is on the level of a second year Canadian undergraduate student, with elementary knowledge of particles, fields, quantum mechanics and thermodynamics. A transcript with above average marks is a requirement. A working knowledge of the English language is mandatory for this position. 1 May, 2015 1 September, 2015 University of Alberta – Edmonton Alberta Carsten Krauss 0 0 null English Utilization of Camelina sativa Residues for Biofuels Production It was previously determined that canola (B. napus) straw can be a suitable substrate for cellulosic biofuels production, and that pretreatment of canola residue with lignin-degrading white-rot fungi confers a range of benefits to the energy balance of biofuels processes. Using this information, a vision for how biological pretreatment using lignin-degrading fungi might be incorporated into a biofuels production chain for agricultural residue was outlined; however, the detailed logistics with any particular residue has to be investigated. As part of an ongoing effort to explore the biofuel potential of Camelina sativa, initial observations made using B. napus straw will be extended to C. sativa straw. This project will generate baseline data for residue from 48 lines of C. sativa from the Plant Gene Resource of Canada (PGRC) germplasm collection regarding cell wall composition, biological pretreatment with white-rot fungi, lignin fragment extraction, enzymatic saccharification/ethanol fermentation, compaction/pelleting characteristics, and thermal combustion properties. Initial work examining cell wall composition in the stems of a single line of C. sativa showed that this material is lignin-rich and cellulose-poor compared to B. napus straw. A wide array of C. sativa lines obtained from PGRC germplasm have shown approximately 26% lignin by weight, with only slight variability observed among the lines. Furthermore, solid-state fermentation of C. sativa residue using a limited number of white-rot fungi showed that the residue was an excellent growth substrate for wild-type Trametes versicolor (strain 52J) but that a mutant T. versicolor strain deficient in cellulose catabolism (strain m4D) as well as wild-type Phanerochaete chrysosporium grew poorly on the substrate under the conditions we used. Material that was treated with T. versicolor 52J was an excellent material for biomass pellet processing, with significant increases in pellet strength and durability compared to other treatments. Pellets formed from T. versicolor 52J-treated Camelina residue were stronger and more durable than pellets formed from thermochemically pretreated barley residue examined previously. Pelletizing biologically pretreated biomass leads to an efficient feedstock logistic system to supply a conversion process (thermochemical or biochemical) with suitable biomass. These results suggest that very low input biological pretreatment using T. versicolor 52J or other fungal strains will provide benefits to a biofuels production chain using crop residue from C. sativa. C. sativa lines from the PGRC germplasm with the most desirable characteristics from a whole-plant utilization perspective will be selected. The most efficient use of the residue for biofuel production will be examined, including techno-economic analysis in order to set yield targets and quantify the potential economic benefits. Residue compression/compaction facilitated by biological pretreatment will be the starting point for analysis, and downstream processes will be optimized as dictated by the composition of the material to maximize the biofuel potential of the substrate. Dr. Lope Tabil is the Principal Investigator of the above-named proposed project. The Co-Investigators are Dr. Tim Dumonceaux and Dr. Edmund Mupondwa of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon Research Centre. Dr. Tabil a professor in Biological Engineering at the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan with expertise in value-added processing of biological materials and postharvest technology. He holds research grants/contract from NSERC, Saskatchewan Agriculture and Food-Agriculture Development Fund and the National Centres of Excelence through BioFuelNet. He currently supervises or co-supervises 4 graduate students (3 Ph.D., 1 M.Sc.), and has supervised/co-supervised 11 M.Sc. graduates, 6 Ph.D. graduates, 3 Post-doctoral fellows and 34 other highly qualified personnel. He has published 94 refereed journal papers, 8 book chapters, and more than 190 conference papers. For the past few years, his projects has been focused mainly on biomass pre-processing (grinding, densification and pretreatment), logistics and techno-economic evaluation in collaboration with faculty within the University of Saskatchewan and research scientists at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada-Saskatoon Research Centre. Compression and compaction characteristics of agricultural biomass, lignocellulosic material characterization using facilities of the Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, pretreatment of biomass (using steam explosion, microwave and infrared heat treatment and microbial) prior to densification, densification (pelleting and briquetting) of biomass for thermochemical and biochemical conversion, techno-economic evaluation of biomass pre-processing operations are some of the activities in his research program. The student will work directly with the Principal Investigator and the Co-Investigators. The project involves communication with scientists and researchers at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon Research Centre and the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan for experimental material procurement, and laboratory work planning and execution. Information gathering will also be done using the Internet. The main role of the student is to conduct cell wall analysis, solid-state fermentation experiments of biomass and thereafter determining the compaction properties of biomass and its physico-chemical properties. He/she will be trained in the operation of different equipment for chemical analysis and physical properties test. He/she will also be trained to operate the Instron tester for pelleting single samples of biomass. At the end of his/her work term, the student is expected to write a report in a paper format (based upon conference paper format of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers) and give a seminar based on the research project he/she has conducted. The student should have completed at least 3 years of Engineering or Science/Technology, particularly in Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Chemical/Biochemical Engineering, or Biotechnology. A good command of the English language, written and spoken, is also required. Since repetitive biological material testing is part of the work, the student should possess the necessary theory behind strength of materials and physico-chemical properties of biological materials. The student should have personal attributes of patience and enthusiasm. Knowledge on basic statistics and proficiency in computer operation (reference and information search, programming and/or equipment interfacing) are desirable skills. 4 May, 2015 24 July, 2015 University of Saskatchewan – Saskatoon Saskatchewan Lope Tabil 0 0 null English Meiosis-specific checkpoints and regulators for sexual differentiation under nutrient starvation conditions. A number of studies have shown that trace elements such as copper and zinc are necessary for normal progression of meiosis. Insufficient concentrations of these metal ions result in meiotic blocks as well as errors during meiosis, which give rise aneuploidy, cancer, infertility, and developmental defects. Despite the known essential role for essential metals during meiotic differentiation, metal-requiring and metal ion transport proteins involved in this developmental process remain poorly understood. Schizosaccharomyces pombe is one of the best genetically amenable organisms to use in deciphering key molecular aspects of meiotic division from its initiation through to the generation of gametes. Yeast meiosis-specific genes, especially those from S. pombe, share elevated degrees of homology with corresponding human genes. The proposed project will undertake the characterization of novel metal-dependent proteins that play critical signalling functions during meiosis. One system use for these studies is based on the S. pombe pat1-induced meiosis, which produces a highly synchronized meiotic entry, allowing the exquisite determination of transcriptional profiles and steady-state protein levels of cell-cycle regulators. A second system for the proposed studies is called azygotic meiosis and allows sufficient synchrony for cytological studies throughout the meiotic program. The learning and use of these 2 systems will allow, for the student, the discovery of new transporters and metal-dependent regulation processes during the cellular program that reduces the chromosomes complement by half, generating haploid gametes to ensure both genetic diversity and faithful reproduction. On a daily basis, micronutrients serve as catalytic and structural cofactors for many enzymes that are intimately linked to essential cellular functions. Dysfunction of micronutrient-dependent proteins underlies severe human disorders including anemia, metabolic syndromes and neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. SLA, Alzheimer, Parkinson). In the case of pathogenic fungi, acquisition of micronutrients is so critical that they have evolved in order to "steal" micronutrients from their host or environment. Pr Labbé’s work consists to identify fungal molecules and mechanisms that are involved in the regulation and transport of micronutrients, including a number of proteins that play crucial roles in iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) homeostasis. Meiosis is an essential process in sexually reproducing species that allows the transmission of the genetic information to the next generation. Its dysfunction causes numerous disorders, including infertility, aneuploidy and cancer. The relatively short life expectancy of mammalian meiotic cells in co-culture represents a hurdle to use these cells for studies of the whole meiotic program. Moreover, they are very difficult to synchronize with respect to their entry into meiosis. Consequently, the use of model organisms has become an attractive avenue for the study of the molecular mechanisms that initiate and regulate meiosis. Among these models, the fission yeast is one of the best genetically amenable organisms to use in deciphering molecular aspects of meiotic division from initiation to generation of mature haploid cells. We have developed fission yeast derivative systems that allow the study of the key mechanistic aspects of Fe and Cu homeostasis, from membrane transporters to transcription factors, during the generation of haploid gametes. The student will be incorporated into ongoing projects. After 6 weeks, the student will be invited to develop its own project, which will be linked with other major projects that are underway in the lab. Education in biotechnology or/and molecular and cellular biology. 1 May, 2015 1 August, 2015 Université de Sherbrooke – Sherbrooke Québec Simon Labbe 0 0 null English Customizable Designs at the Junction of Everyday Objects and and Specific Medical/Health Conditions Specific Medical/Health Project aim This project will explore the use of 3d printing and other local manufacturing techniques to develop customized products for individual users. This research will focus on evaluating current and potential design and production tools to create a framework for designers to create customized ergonomic and biometic products. Proposed methodology • Conduct background research into local production facilities, the use of sustainable materials and manufacturing techniques within the context of product design. • Precedent research- finding processes, practitioners and locations who focus on customizing objects for individual biometric features within the medical and commercial fields. A key part of this research will be assess the experience of getting fitted • Assess existing CAD programmes that assist in the fitting and making process. Software and hardware that will assist in the fitting and the making process will be evaluated • Test design scenarios- Create and evaluate a design process for individually fitted products as the outcome. As part of the design and evaluation process, applied research will be conducted with individually selected users. Potential specialized areas of study could include: • Eye glasses frame design and local manufacturing • Personalized foot braces post hip/knee surgery • Products that assist in everyday tasks but where the movement of the body is restricted through injury or other medical issues ( i.e. arthritis) • Products that assist user but when their health impairment improves or worsens, the product or parts of the product could be replaced to reflect their current state of mobility/impairment. Research Question How can product designers, assisted by digital tools, develop and create everyday objects that are fitted to the ergonomics and biomechanics of one specific user? Background In the medical field, customization of fit to the particularities of the human body is already commonplace. Scanning of joints, bones, organs etc. for prosthetic fitting or for creating items is common practice within the medical field. This research intends to explore the extension of these bespoke approaches to the design of everyday objects. With the proliferation of 3D printing and other local manufacturing technologies, coupled with the development of digital design tools that foster customized designs, there is a developing need for industrial design approaches that support a bespoke and localized approach. This research will examine new design processes and tools to enable next generation design - a combination of local production, bespoke design using tailoring and generative techniques, 3d printing and other local manufacturing techniques, with design tools to manage ergonomic/biomechanics at the level of the individual. One area where there has been considerable development of these new approaches is in healthcare. Here there have been some exemplar projects such as bespoke prosthetics enhanced by digital design tools and fitting techniques, and 3D printed implants. We propose that these examples can be used as a reference to extrapolate bespoke design and manufacture beyond medical to consumer products in a range of industries including accessories, eye wear, shoes and sporting goods. 1. http://www.nike.com/us/en_us/c/nikeid 2. http://newyork.ardenreed.com/tailor-truck/ 3. http://www.leftshoecompany.com/how_it_works The student will assist in the background and precedent research and will be involved in the design and evaluation process. Depending on the project stage this work may also involve in testing and applying new software, working on 3D CAD models ideally using generative design methods as well as creating tangible mock ups and finished models that are bespoke and fitted to the individual and can be tested. The student may also assist in interviews as well as data analysis. Documentation of the process and work is crucial element and can be done in the form of written reports that will have a visual component (rendering/ visualisation of data). Student may also be involved in the user testing and generating iterative tangible outcomes. Design Products, Interaction Design or Design Engineering. Students should have excellent knowledge of how to analyze, conceptualize, represent, define and develop products. They should possess an in-depth understanding of the context of the design, its humanistic and global nature, and its international dimension. Students should be capable of developing a design that meets the user’s actual requirements. Excellent design skills required in: 3D CAD modeling and visualization skills (Rhinoceros 5 Grasshopper or Solidworks or Autodesk Inventor/ Keyshot or similar); Adobe In Design; Illustrator; Photoshop and basic skills in movie making. Experienced in different research methodologies such as ethnographic research, contextual Inquiry and observations also an asset. Sample of work is required. 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 OCAD University – Toronto Ontario Angelika Seeschaaf Veres 0 1 to be confirmed English Assessing and Improving Deposition of Oil Sands Tailings The Canadian oil sands industry is viewed as a vital component to the Canadian economy. At the same time, the environmental impacts of oil sands operations are also growing. Processed oil sands ore yields a tailings slurry composed of water, sand, silt and clay (or “fines”), and a small amount of residual bitumen. The tailings are discharged into a settling basin, allowing the sand fraction to settle quickly on the beach with the balance of fine tailings settling in the pond. Dr. Ward Wilson was awarded the NSERC/COSIA Industrial Research Chair in Oil Sands Tailings Geotechnique to investigate how Canada's oil sands industry could minimize and eventually eliminate the long-term storage of fluid tailings in the reclamation landscape as well as to eliminate or reduce the containment of fluid tailings and external tailings disposal areas during operations. It is anticipated that this research program will result in the development of new field investigation techniques, understanding of fine tailings behaviour, tailings simulation models and unsaturated soil mechanical models, which will be transferred to Canada’s oil sands tailings industry. Further, the collaboration between industry and academia will enable fundamental discoveries for the behaviour and improved management of fluid fine tailings. Dr. Wilson is a Professor in the Department of Civil Environmental Engineering at the University of Alberta and is currently the Principal Investigator of the Oil Sands Tailings Research Facility (OSTRF) located in Devon, Alberta. He brings over 25 years of industrial experience to his practice in advanced mine waste management and unsaturated soil mechanics. He has extensive work experience as a consulting engineer and has maintained a strong industrial focus through his research programs. Dr. Wilson is involved in mine waste management systems for numerous sites worldwide. He has also served as a specialist consultant to several large international mining companies such as the well-known ARD Risk Review recently completed by Rio Tinto. In addition, Dr. Wilson recently served as the lead author responsible for the chapter on Prevention and Mitigation in the Global Acid Rock Drainage Guide prepared for International Network for Acid Prevention. Dr. Wilson has developed extensive programs in soil cover systems for mine waste management and long-term closure of tailings and waste rock. He led the development of the comprehensive numerical model ‘SoilCover’ (under the Canadian MEND program) for the prediction of soil cover performance. In addition, he was responsible for the benchmark research programs for predicting and monitoring of the performance of the cover systems at the Equity Silver and Kidston Gold Mines. Dr. Wilson is currently engaged in large scale-up experiments for waste rock at the Grasberg and Antamina mines to investigate various mitigation techniques as well as a new and innovative research program for the blending of tailings and waste rock (Paste Rock) to produce new high-strength sealing materials for mine waste management systems. Students will assist with compiling and analyzing data obtained from site investigations of various tailings deposits and present the results in a technical report in collaboration with other researchers. This data may include pore water pressures and density for comparison with laboratory and model results. Students will assist with preparing, characterizing and laboratory testing of tailings samples obtained from the field as well as preparing samples for geotechnical centrifuge testing. Laboratory testing may include slurry consolidation properties and unsaturated soil properties. Students must be critical thinkers, show creativity in problem solving and enjoy the challenge of working through difficult, real-world problems. Students should have a strong background in geotechnical engineering and experience in geotechnical laboratory work. Students with a background in mine waste and tailings management preferred. Students should be proficient in Microsoft Office Suite applications (i.e. Excel) and have an excellent command of English (both oral and written). 1 May, 2015 15 August, 2015 University of Alberta – Edmonton Alberta Ward Wilson 0 1 COSIA English Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems Renewable energy sources such as wind and solar are integral to smart microgrids. A recent study completed by the California Energy Commission indicates that the performance of the power grid degrades ‘significantly’ with 20% renewable energy sources, and becomes ‘extreme’ at 30%. Energy storage technologies play a critical role in efficient operation of microgrids by ensuring energy availability during periods of high demand, smoothing fluctuations in supply and demand, and enhancing grid reliability. Advances in battery and fuel-cell technologies have made it possible to design multi-hundred watt to multi-hundred megawatt energy storage systems. The success of these energy storage systems critically depends on modelling of energy storage elements, efficient power electronics conversion and development of hybrid power systems (wind, PV, battery and fuel-cells). The proposed project will develop new hybrid power architecture to minimize energy storage requirements. Fuel cells and batteries will be modelled to design high power storage systems, with emphasis given to optimizing the sizing of each type of energy storage and dynamic behaviour of the system. In designing these architectures, new power converter topologies will be developed that provide bidirectional operation to charge and discharge the batteries, and to connect the energy storage system to the power grid, with emphasis given to innovating technology for efficiency optimization and grid compatibility. Requirements for optimal system control, dynamic islanding, power quality and fault tolerance as dictated by the smart microgrid will be embedded in designing the new hybrid power architectures. The worldwide electricity generation exceeds 22,000 TWh and is growing continuously. This is exerting tremendous pressure on the governments throughout the world to build new centralized electricity generating power plants requiring expensive new transmission and distribution lines. Moreover, the generation of electricity is responsible for producing over 30,000 Mt of CO2 emissions yearly. There is increasing demand for more eco-friendly technologies, and today’s electrical power grid is no longer capable of meeting societal demands. In order to reduce CO2 emissions and cost of building the new power infrastructures, a concerted effort is being made by the governments worldwide to produce more electricity from renewable energy sources and to build new decentralized smart power infrastructures known as ‘microgrids’. The smart microgrid research to be undertaken by Dr. Jain’s research team over the next seven years proposes to develop a prototype smart microgrid platform: a flexible and adaptive grid that will incorporate practical power electronics, real-time energy generation, distribution, storage and consumption to facilitate the development of optimized next-generation smart grid technology systems that fulfill industry standards and help to meet greenhouse gas emission goals. The proposed research program is focussed in devising new approaches to design smart microgrids. The major emphasis is placed in developing autonomous control methods and novel power electronics technology that integrates all the requirements of a reliable smart grid at the components’ level. In particular, new control techniques, power electronics converters and architectures will be developed for renewable electricity generation, electric cars and energy storage. To help senior graduate students and post-doctoral fellows in performing mathematical analysis, simulation and building and testing simple prototypes of power electronics converters. Electrical Circuit Analysis, Basic Electronics, Mathematics, Analog and Digital Electronics. 1 June, 2015 1 June, 2015 Queen's University – Kingston Ontario Praveen Jain 0 1 Cistel Technology English Critical awareness for e-health literacy through digital and social inclusion: A conceptual model This project addresses the current trend among government, professional associations, and non-government organizations to spread e-health information (e-HI) regarding health promotion, as well as diseases’ prevention, treatment and rehabilitation. Little remain known about the views of users of e-HI about the effectiveness of the aforementioned approach, as well as how they appraise such e-HI as accurate, credible and safe. In other words, the critical components of the e-HI users remain uncovered. The key objective of this research is to develop a conceptual understanding of the use of Paulo Freire’s critical pedagogy to promote autonomy among the users of e-HI. Considering that critical awareness could lead to community and personal empowerment and then, to transform people’s life, the lack of a direct dialogue between the health educator/promoter and the user of e-health information may threaten the feasibility of empowerment aiming to achieve high e-health literacy (e-HL). I am particularly interested in learning with the research intern about Brazilian innovation in the area of e-health education, health promotion, as well as digital inclusion for socially vulnerable populations. Moreover, this project relates to the development of a new research project about e-HL in host society and the promotion of digital and social inclusion currently under planning with Dr. Rogério Meireles Pinto (Associate Professor, Columbia University (NY, USA) School of Social Work). This project will offer research training opportunity to a Brazilian undergraduate student in the disciplines of information technology or educational technologies, who has experienced and developed a critical view about his/her own discipline and scope of practice as a member of a multidisciplinary team for mass health education. This proposed project concerns the knowledge synthesis and knowledge production of a new conceptual understanding about the use of critical pedagogy in mass health education. The key objectives are (a) to conceive a robust conceptual modelling of such self-educative work; (b) to draft an outline of manuscripts about knowledge synthesis and the new conceptual model; and (c) to offer a conceptual model to guide the development of an international validation study in Canada, Brazil and USA. Therefore, the expected learning outcomes for the student research trainee are: (1) the acquisition of refined analytical skills regarding the use of scientific evidences and the incorporation of research findings in health promotion, (2) the acquisition of high conceptual skills, and (3) the development of scholarly writing skills for publication. The plan of work involves: - conduct a literature including grey (popular) and scientific literature; - retrieve reports of original, creative projects targeting mass health education through media as implemented in Brazil for digital and social inclusion; - prepare commented summaries of the retrieved projects and reviewed literature; - identify analytical research questions and interpretative hypotheses; - design a conceptual model on critical awareness and e-health literacy; - write abstracts for conferences and draft a scholarly manuscript The research intern will be directly supervised by Dr. Zanchetta in collaboration with Dr. Pinto; her/his work environment will allow direct contact with Dr. Zanchetta and virtual communication with Dr. Pinto. Since 2003, I have studied issues of Brazilian primary health care and educational practice of community health agents. My research program in Canada and Brazil explores health literacy under conditions of social marginalization and linguistic minorities as factors of social vulnerability. My work in Brazil has involved so far 10 undergraduate Canadian interns support by Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, 3 Canadian volunteers for social development projects, as well as 3 Canadian faculty in a project financed by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research in a knowledge dissemination and exchange project about social determinants of health. In Canada, I am studying Francophone linguistic minority populations and masculinity as a determinant of health. My research interest is refocusing on issues of e-health literacy and digital inclusion for Canadian ethno-linguistic minorities, as well as young adult male use of online e-HI to respond to their knowledge curiosity and needs for solving health and wellness issues. In addition, as a research trainer/mentor, since 2007, I have been involved in working with more than 30 research volunteer trainees who were interested in working with my research program in Brazil and Canada, as well as being trained in public presentations and scholarly publications. Due to my previous experience as a research mentor, the achievement of proposed activities to be developed by the research intern will depend on his/her learning style, as well as own learning expectations as a RA. By my pedagogical philosophy based on Paulo Freire’s ideas, a learner’s dreams and plans are the core of the learning process. Therefore, some proposed responsibilities for the student will be thus, negotiated and refined. The main responsibilities will include: - Participate in a training on RefWorks, CINAHL, MEDLINE database with a librarian - Review publications about systematic review of literature - Review publications about qualitative data analysis using inductive methods - Arrange team meetings with US and Brazilian based researchers - Keep a log of discussions and proposed ideas - Conduct a literature review in English and Portuguese to support interpretation of findings(including scholarly and grey literature) - Contact Brazilian governmental and community organizations to obtain documents and publication to support new data interpretation - Participate in discussions with the research team to develop analytical research questions and interpretative hypotheses about e-HL and critical pedagogy - Explore literature contents supporting those hypotheses, as well as responding the analytical research questions - Prepare a summary of the analytical work - Collaborate in the conception of a conceptual framework about e-HL and critical pedagogy - Contribute to knowledge dissemination activities targeting Brazilian audience, as well as, Canadian and USA ones (conference abstracts, university presentations, fact sheets, scholarly manuscripts) The candidate must have been enrolled for a minimum of 3 months in practicum field in any project of development and pilot testing of information technology, or in a project of new educational technology implemented in a school, physical or virtual, environment. The candidate should possess experiential knowledge in creation of those technologies targeting for adult users. Personal skills include: Be creative, inquisitive, independent, and autonomous, had successfully completed a research methods course, able to follow instructions and meet deadlines, as well as, to demonstrate excellent organizational skills, computer literacy, and mastery of English language -excellent oral and written communication. 1 June, 2015 31 August, 2015 Ryerson University – Toronto Ontario Margareth Zanchetta 0 0 null English Environmental dependency and vulnerability in rural China OBJECTIVES Rural populations in developing countries rely heavily on the environment for survival. Yet we know little about how this dependency varies over time or space, what demographic or market factors affect it, and which parts of the landscape are most critical for continued livelihood support. This project aims to develop methods to measure and map ecosystem service dependency. The main objectives are to: 1. estimate an ecosystem service dependency index (ESDI), a quantitative estimate of how much a household livelihoods depend directly on local ecosystems, 2. estimate an ecosystem service vulnerability index (ESVI), a quantitative summary of how changes in the environment may impact household livelihoods. SUMMARY This project aims to further our understanding of the links between human welfare and “ecosystem services” – the benefits we receive from nature. While we all depend to some degree on functioning ecosystems for our survival, this project focuses on populations that depended directly on the environment for their livelihoods, in particular rural households in developing countries. Numerous case studies have measured populations’ environmental dependency, usually defined as the percent of their total livelihoods that comes from environmental resources. These efforts have shown that the environment can provide stability for households in areas with weak markets and help buffer against agricultural risks (such as drought or crop disease) and unforeseen household “shocks” (like illness or death). However, in the face of changing environmental conditions, we have little understanding of whether households that are highly dependent on the environment are also highly vulnerable to environmental change. Further, we have no way of knowing which parts of a landscape are most valuable to poor and vulnerable communities. For example, what is more important: forests in the headwaters of a watershed that help provide adequate water quality to a community, or wild herbs collected nearby? Additionally, how do multiple communities’ dependencies aggregate over the landscape as a whole? We will create a method for developing an ecosystem service dependency index (ESDI), and its dynamic variant, an ecosystem service vulnerability index (ESVI) that rely on a detailed understanding of household livelihoods and welfare. We will pilot these methods through household surveys in the Miyun Reservoir watershed, which provides drinking water to the nearly 20 million residents of Beijing. Understanding land use and livelihood relationships in this area is immediately relevant to ongoing policy efforts to protect the water quality and quantity of the reservoir. This project also builds on previous joint research efforts with partners at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Natural Capital Project. We have historical land use and population data already in hand, and applicable ecosystem service models for the area have been parameterized and analyzed. Household data will be collected in August 2014. My research is centered in the growing field of "ecosystem services" -- which I define as simply the benefits that people get from nature. I work to better understand how to measure, account for and value ecosystem services so that we can make better decisions about how to shape development. I often look at the local level to assess how people meet their needs through use of ecosystems and natural resources, and the role this plays in development in poorer regions of the world. Some questions that drive my research include: - How do people use ecosystems to support their livelihoods? What parts of the landscape are most critical for that support? - Why do communities create management institutions? How do these impact resource use and livelihoods? - How does household behavior interact with policy intentions, for instance in payment for ecosystem services programs? Some of my recent projects have evaluated the livelihood impacts of a payment for ecosystem services program (PES) near Beijing, how rural villages choose to manage mushroom harvests in southern China, and how land tenure influences deforestation. Much of my research looks at the household level and assesses how livelihoods depend on ecosystem services. But I am also interested in how land use change can impact the benefits we get from the environment. Most of my work is quantitative and uses an institutional and economic lens. I look at these issues through the use of household surveys, statistical analysis, and ecosystem services models. My methods draw from environmental and development economics, ecology, development geography, and geographic information sciences. A good general understanding of both natural and social systems are necessary for this kind of work. The student will work with data collected from the Miyun watershed to investigate links between livelihoods and environmental resource use. There is some flexibility in the exact nature of the project the student undertakes so long as it fits within the broad framework outlined in the project description. Here are a few examples of the kinds of projects a student could pursue: 1. Using the data at hand, characterize variation in wealth in our sample of households, and the sources of wealth that contribute most to households' livelihoods (ie farm sources, off-farm sources, environmental sources). 2. Combine historic land use change data with household survey data to assess how household livelihood opportunities have changed over time. 3. Develop future land use "scenarios" that lay out options for alternative land use policies. Then, using existing GIS models (eg, InVEST - see http://www.naturalcapitalproject.org/InVEST.html) estimate changes in the supply of ecosystem services for the study population. 4. Characterize the demand for ecosystem services in the study region from household data. The ideal student will have a background in environmental/ecological economics, environmental geography, statistical analysis/econometrics, and proficiency with GIS software. Desired skills include programming skills, particularly python, and knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. Necessary skills will depend on the exact nature of the project a student pursues. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 McGill University – Montréal Québec Brian Robinson 0 0 null English Biogeochemical interactions with food and foodwebs in streams. Ecological processes are strongly influenced by biogeochemistry, including the availability and forms of N, P and C. Recent approaches to studying effects of concentration and stoichiometry are not enough to capture the effects of the forms of these nutrients on ecological interactions. In streams, the main sources of biological energy are dissolved organic matter (through groundwater) and particulate organic matter (primarily leaf litter). These food sources are used by a range of microbes (bacteria and fungi) which make the energy available to higher trophic levels. However, they often still require additional N and P from the surface water. This also puts these microbes into potential competition with each other and with algae, a primary producer. This set of studies will experimentally manipulate concentrations and ratios of N and P, while at the same time altering the quality of the carbon source with different forms of dissolved organic matter. We will also use knock-out experiments to adjust the microbial community, using antimicrobial drugs. This work will be partly field based (at our research forest on the outskirts of Vancouver) and lab based. The work will require laboratory work to characterise the water chemistry and carbon sources, as well as analysis of algal, fungal and bacterial biomass. The intern will have the opportunity to learn about experimental design, laboratory procedures, ecology of stream ecosystems, and analysis of data. characterising groundwater dissolved organic carbon nutrient effects on DOM breakdown productivity effects (experimental manipulations of inputs) contributions to support of biodiversity My research program seeks to determine the mechanisms and regulatory processes by which communities are structured, and how population densities within communities are set. My usual approach is to use experimental modulation of one or more variables within a community to test causal predictions. Most of these studies take a mechanistic view to understanding the rates and controls on processes operating within ecosystems. Experiments in combination with descriptive studies have provided a foundation for extending our understanding of how stream and riparian systems function. Indirect and food-web interactions are clearly strong determinants of community organisation and themselves subject to perturbation. I have used these approaches for a variety of basic and applied questions, such as examining the effects of forest management, while maintaining a sound theoretical foundation. All of these components are destined to provide inputs to synthetic and predictive models of stream and riparian areas that will be designed with management or restoration of natural areas as objectives. One current theme is to determine how the quality, timing and quantity of cross-ecosystem resource subsidies affect consumer populations (in streams or riparian areas) and the communities that populations are part of. This includes consideration of the stoichiometry and pathways of entry into food webs. Cross-ecosystem resource subsidies can also account for higher biodiversity of riparian and stream food webs, and one of our questions is how those resources contribute to diversity. Another theme that permeates our research is how anthropogenic changes affect these resources and subsequently the populations and communities that can benefit. The student intern will assist with field-based experiments in experimental streams to test the role of DOM and nutrients on food web productivity. More details were provided above. Undergraduate courses in ecology, and preferably freshwater ecology, will be important. Some chemistry, statistics and knowledge of experimental procedures would be helpful. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of British Columbia – Vancouver British Columbia Dr. John S. RICHARDSON 1 0 null English Near-Living Architecture The Near-Living Architecture project aims to support examination of new technologies and new aesthetics of complex architectural systems. The general objective of this project is to explore a new role for architectural environments, transforming portions of static buildings into dynamic responsive generative surfaces and equipping them with near-living intelligent distributed computation systems and 'metabolic' (chemically active) functions. New generations of interactive architecture have entered a period of rapid acceleration marked by innovative technologies. Current frameworks for evaluation of these environments (Kolarevic, 06, Fox, 08 et al) have tended to value performance as a key criterion, and a wide knowledge gap is evident in applications that attempt to integrate specialized aesthetic language and distributed systems technologies applied to immersive architectural environments. The topic focus aims to shift theoretical balance from purely performative aspects toward hybrid, mutually dependent, 'empathic' relationships between occupants and their environment. Pointed criticism is appearing within contemporary discourse suggesting that new generative and parametric design practice has yet to engage the critical consequences of ‘responsive’ design [Mertins, 2004 ; Khan, 2009 ]. In response, the NLA program seeks to develop a practical and theoretical platform that examines the associated paradigms of 'performative', 'responsive' and 'interactive' qualities, considering these expanded architectural functions as mutable and contestable. Striking advances in the field have been achieved by following a method of designing, simulating and testing prototype large-scale immersive environments in partnership with cultural institutions worldwide. The receptor ACADIA community of North American educators in computational design of architecture provides a research forum in which the Hylozoic Series, the key series of prototype environments undertaken by NLA has been widely cited as a pioneering case study in the evolving field. The work involves structured exchanges between collaborators from architecture and digital media design, The work is organized in three streams: • Meshwork Design Systems employ flexible structural scaffolds for mounting interactive and chemical systems. • Living Chemistry systems capable of processing environmental gases and effluents are at the early stages of integration within the experimental architectural facades and canopies being developed by the research partnership. • Digital Design Tools and Complex-Systems Simulation serves conception, practical design process, and analysis of the prototype assemblies. • Design strategies for technical implementations of these adaptive systems would be informed by recent research into Kinetic Architectural Systems Design and the integration of information, gesture and cognitive control into architectural envelopes. [Fox,2003; Kemp,2008] Current sensory-based kinetic design research, [Pan, Jeng, 2008; Oxman, 2007] on how our bodies experience and adapt to digital environments,will provide theoretical basis for discussions around the embodied experiences of empathic interactions. The Near-Living Architecture (NLA) project responds to emerging ecologies of responsive, intelligent, kinetically and chemically active systems within new built environments. These complex systems can increase architecture's capacity to be more responsive to its inhabitants as well as the natural environment, but the integrated, dynamic and evolving nature of these systems exceed the capacity of existing design disciplines. How might we more precisely simulate, visualize and represent the dynamics of open systems? Design paradigms based on adaptation offer substantial qualities that can meet the challenges of this emergying field. Adaptation is a quality of living systems. Adaptation can include evolution in response to new conditions, and it can also involve resistance to change. What are useful models for emulating living systems and ecologies, and how might these new models be translated into effective tools and interfaces for design? What tools, materials and assemblies might we use in designing for adaptation? What new possibilities might emerge for new architectural technologies and new architectural aesthetics? The work builds on the Hylozoic Series of works (first presentation at Montreal Beaux-Arts Museum 2007, now with nearly two dozen international iterations), an interdisciplinary body of creative work and research that integrates lightweight digitally-fabricated kinetic meshwork structures, living chemistry explorations, and interactive microprocessor technology. These projects are a hybrid of sculpture, engineering, biology and architecture that focus on creating flexible structural meshwork densely populated with arrays of mechanisms that can modify the environment and interact with the user. Role of the student in the above-mentioned research project (Max 300 words): *0 words The Architectural Intern will have direct involvement in design, prototyping, fabrication and installation of experimental installations, interactive hybrid assemblies that lead toward next-generation architectural environments. The practical program will involve phases of research and experimentation (material explorations), design and visualization, rapid prototyping and digital fabrication, iterative testing and implementation. Research and Experimentation: The intern will focus on customization techniques that could be employed for rapid prototyping, research into actuated mesh systems, systems analysis and mechanism component design and fabrication. Research and experimentation at this stage will involve two and three dimensional reflection of intended streams of development. Design and Visualization: The intern will make use of computer modeling, simulation, and visualization techniques to explore the conceptual possibilities for the projects and establish design ideals. These models will allow the simulation of such elements as the sensing and actuation systems, the physical properties of the material, and the resulting prototype’s overall physical configuration on large and small scales. Prototyping and Systems Integration: Alongside digital visualization, physical prototyping of components, testing of systems, and mock‐up of assemblies will be employed to ensure that all aspects of the work can be integrated successfully. Through several iterations of design, testing and refinement, components assemblies will be created. Manufacturing and Pre-Assembly: Intensive repetition of small parts and their assembly are key elements. The intern will lead this work, and coordinate with a large contingent of prefabrication volunteers who assist leading up to installation phases. An in‐house laser cutter, CNC router and a three dimensional printer provide core support for small prototype fabrication, while output capacity is supplemented by outsourcing to local production facilities. The position requires advanced architectural skill in three-dimensional modeling and drawing, and practical experience in physical fabrication. The research work will include manipulation design and fabrication tools and software for architectural and industrial design, laser cutting, 3D printing, and graphic design. Specialized training will be provided. While fully specialized skills are not required, experience in in digital design, craft and fabrication skills are assets. 1 May, 2015 1 August, 2015 University of Waterloo – Cambridge Ontario Philip Beesley 0 1 Philip Beesley Architect Inc. English Mexican Material Culture in the Archaeology Department Museum In 2012 the Department of Archaeology at the University of Calgary acquired a large collection (estimated at over 2000 pieces) of pre-Columbian artifacts from the local Glenbow Museum. The majority of these objects originated in Latin America, including many from ancient Mesoamerica. The catalogue that accompanied these pieces is rudimentary, with minimal and often inaccurate identification. The goal of this proposed research project is to generate a reliable catalogue of the Mexican artifacts to include with the more developed Central American catalogue. Like many museum collections, the history of the collections are vague. In the case of the Central American objects, it is known that many were collected by a Costa Rican family who then sold the collection to an American, and eventually to the Glenbow. The Mexican artifacts have no comparable accession information. Some of the pieces were mounted on wooden bases with typewritten labels, but most are unmounted and unidentified. The Mexican materials are generally small ceramic objects, such as figurines. They appear to originate from various parts of Mexico, including Aztec, Teotihuacan, Cholula, Maya, and Gulf Coast cultures. The goal of the research project would be to research and identify different elements of the Mexican collection. This will involve library and on-line research to detect the culture group and time period for the different pieces. The research will then include the detailed measurement and description of the objects, and photography, with the goal of creating a reliable catalogue entry for each object. Finally, the catalogued artifact swill be entered onto the on-line catalogue for worldwide access. The University of Calgary's Latin American collection represents one of the best collections of pre-Columbian art in Canada, and has the potential to become a valuable teaching collection for University classes. The University of Calgary offers extensive classes on Latin American archaeology, and attracts both undergraduate and graduate students for that specialization. A well-developed museum collection will further enhance that learning experience. Furthermore, the on-line catalogue as the potential to educate interested visitors worldwide. I am an anthropological archaeologist with research expertise in Mexico and Central America. My current fieldwork takes place in Nicaragua, where I have directed several projects that have incorporated both Canadian and Central American students. My research focuses on domestic culture as a means for interpreting past social identities, especially gender and ethnicity. These studies utilize material culture such as ceramics, figurines, and spindle whorls to infer social practices. The work in Nicaragua builds on previous research in central Mexico, and relates to ethnohistorical accounts of prehispanic migrations from Mexico to Central America in the centuries prior to European contact. Prior to beginning research in Nicaragua, central Mexico was my research focus, especially the Mexican states of Puebla and Oaxaca. My dissertation research centered on the major urban site of Cholula, Puebla, and I continue to publish on that theme. I have also directed excavations in Oaxaca, another theme of continued publication. As a result I am knowledgeable about the material culture of these and other regions of Mexico, and am therefore able to supervise the research project being requested. In 2012 the University of Calgary's Department of Archaeology acquired a large collection of pre-Columbian artifacts from Central America and Mexico. Since then I have been working with students to organize the collection, and students have presented their research in conferences and in publications. To date the focus has been on the Central American artifacts, but a significant number of Mexican artifacts are also in the collection. The goal of this research fellowship would be to catalogue the Mexican collection. The student would be responsible for researching a variety of artifacts in the museum collection. This research would include use of library collections and on-line resources. Once identified, the student would then have the task of creating a detailed description of the artifact, including illustration and photography. Each artifact would then need to be entered into the digital database which will be maintained in the department, but will also be made available on the worldwide web through the departmental website. A student should have a background in Mesoamerican art and/or archaeology. Basic photography and computer skills, particularly for electronic cataloguing, would also be useful. Ability to read in both English and Spanish would also be helpful. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of Calgary – Calgary Alberta Geoffrey McCafferty 0 0 null English Kinetic modelling of continuous production of anhydrous ethanol using membrane reactor Presently world is facing atmospheric pollution (particulate matter, CO, NOx and SOx emissions) and climate changes as consequences of the use of oil-derived fuels. Ethanol, produced from renewable sources is an alternative fuel to petroleum. Several industries have been producing bioethanol using various techniques. Bioethanol producers are facing a common problem in the separation of water and ethanol to produce high purity of ethanol due to the existence of an azeotrope in the mixture. Various traditional and emerging techniques such as extractive, azeotropic and salt distillations and pressures wing and techniques are being used to solve this problem. Among all above techniques, membrane separation process is considered a clean technology which is widely used in the separation of a liquid–liquid mixtures. The majority of the water from the pure ethanol can be separated at low temperatures by using a membrane bioreactor (MBR). The membrane separation process can reduce the thermal heating and cooling load as well as it will help to save the water and energy. A membrane bio-reactor is a multifunction reactor that combines with the reaction and separation, in one integrated unit, i.e. in-situ removal. In general the ethanol–water separation depends on the thermodynamic properties such as the vapour-liquid equilibrium and interphase equilibrium relationships. The purpose of this study is to explore the application of thermodynamics in membrane technology for the membrane purification process for production of high purity ethanol. The present work will give substantial insight into understanding the efficiency and performance of the membrane reactor by optimizing the process parameters such as temperature, ethanol concentrations, operating time, and separation mechanism and reaction kinetic studies. In addition, scaling up and process economics can be studied to evaluate the commercial viability of the process. Dr. Ajay K. Dalai is a professor of Chemical Engineering and Canada Research Chair of Bioenergy and Environmentally friendly chemical processing, and has been spear-heading a big research group of about 25 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows (PDFs) since 2000 in the Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering Laboratories, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan. Dr. A.K. Dalai’s research areas include environmental catalysis such as alkylates from butane using solid acids and conversion of sulfur-containing compounds from gases, waste water and other streams; chemical processing and products development; upgrading and hydrotreating of crude petroleum feedstocks; alternative renewable energy production such as hydrogen and bio-diesel from biomass and bio-oils; production and application of carbon supports such as carbon nanotubes, ordered mesoporous carbons, carbon nanohorns, and their potential applications for the conversion synthesis gas (mainly CO H2) to clean/green transportation fuels by the gas-to-liquid (GTL) technology via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis approach. In this regards, he has supervised research activities on the development of novel solid acid catalysts for biodiesel production from various feedstocks and production of value added chemicals from crude glycerol. With a wide range of sophisticated analytical equipment such as XRD, TPR/TPD, BET, FTIR, TGA/DTA, Raman, etc., readily available at his disposal for catalysts preparation and extensive characterizations coupled with various reactors such as micro-trickle bed CSTRs equipped in his laboratories, cutting-edge research activities is of utmost desirability in his research group. The intern will be working in conjunction a post-doctoral research student, Dr. Nedunuri Rambabu, under the supervision of Dr. A.K. Dalai. The student will be trained on the basic preparation protocols for the preparation of membrane for ethanol/water applications. Furthermore, the intern will also be introduced to various characterization techniques for analyzing prepared membranes. He/she will learn design the membrane reactor and get it ready for operations. Moreover, the intern will be given a thorough operational schedule of the reactors to facilitate in-depth understanding of the operability of the reactors. Subsequently, he/she will then be tasked to develop process flow diagrams. He/she will prepare a report based on the work performed and make an oral presentation of his/her work to at least 25-30 scientists/students working in this area. Presently, Rambabu Nedunuri is working on the preparation of membrane separation of ethanol and water. He will be working closely with the intern by providing the necessary guidelines and information regarding process and operation. The successful intern would be a chemical engineering undergraduate student, academically sound, and has some understanding in separation techniques, reaction engineering, process control, fluid mechanics and optimization with interests in research activities. It would be necessary for the intern to know how to apply these techniques to develop process flow diagrams pending economic analysis assessments. He should also be versatile with the use of Microsoft office package for the basic development of charts and graphs resulting from economic analysis assessments to ascertain the potential commercial ramifications of the project. The intern should be able to write-up significant findings of the project and prepare a report summarizing the outcome of the project at the end of the internship period. 1 June, 2015 30 August, 2015 University of Saskatchewan – Saskatoon Saskatchewan Ajay Dalai 0 0 null English Techno-economic study of crude glycerol purification Biodiesel is produced from various vegetable oils using alcohols; usually methanol through transesterification reaction. Glycerol is one of the major by-products of biodiesel production. It was estimated that approximately 1 kg of crude glycerol is generated for every 10 kg of biodiesel produced. With the rapid growth of the world’s biodiesel production in recent years, a large surplus of glycerol has been created, leading to the closure of several traditional glycerol production plants. At present, crude glycerol is of little economic value, i.e., approximately $0.1/kg, due to the presence of various impurities such as methanol, soap, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs, i.e., biodiesel), and alkaline catalyst residues. It has become a serious issue and financial and environmental liability for the biodiesel industry. Currently, one of the major challenges for the utilization of crude glycerol is the inconsistency of its composition since it varies with the feedstocks, production processes, and post-treatments involved in biodiesel production. Upgrading or refining crude glycerol to technical grade glycerol (98% glycerol content) makes its composition more consistent. Typical crude glycerol purification techniques involve neutralization of acids.bases catalysts, removal of neutralized salts, and the final step involves purification of glycerol by either vacuum distillation or membrane separation. This research project focuses on techno-economic studies of different processes of crude glycerol purification. The aim of this project is to recommend a profitable purification process to the biodiesel industry. The techno-economic study will be carried out with the help of commercial process simulation packages (i.e. Aspen Plus, Aspen HYSYS). The data for basis of the simulation and composition of the crude glycerol will be collected from local biodiesel production plant. After finishing this project a profitable crude glycerol purification process will be recommended for the biodiesel industry and the student involved in this project will gain knowledge on process design and conducting process feasibility study. Dr. Ajay K. Dalai is a professor of Chemical Engineering and Canada Research Chair of Bioenergy and Environmentally friendly chemical processing, and has been spear-heading a big research group of about 25 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows (PDFs) since 2000 in the Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering Laboratories, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan. Dr. A.K. Dalai’s research areas include environmental catalysis such as alkylates from butane using solid acids and conversion of sulfur-containing compounds from gases, waste water and other streams; chemical processing and products development; upgrading and hydrotreating of crude petroleum feedstocks; alternative renewable energy production such as hydrogen and bio-diesel from biomass and bio-oils; production and application of carbon supports such as carbon nanotubes, ordered mesoporous carbons, carbon nanohorns, and their potential applications for the conversion synthesis gas (mainly CO H2) to clean/green transportation fuels by the gas-to-liquid (GTL) technology via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis approach. In this regards, he has supervised research activities on the development of novel solid acid catalysts for biodiesel production from various feedstocks and production of value added chemicals from crude glycerol. With a wide range of sophisticated analytical equipment such as XRD, TPR/TPD, BET, FTIR, TGA/DTA, Raman, etc., readily available at his disposal for catalysts preparation and extensive characterizations coupled with various reactors such as micro-trickle bed CSTRs equipped in his laboratories, cutting-edge research activities is of utmost desirability in his research group. The intern will be working in conjunction a Ph.D student, Chinmoy Baroi, under the supervision of Dr. A.K. Dalai. The student will be trained on conducting process feasibility study using commercial process simulation software (i.e., Aspen Plus, HYSYS). Additionally, the student will have a chance to be familiarized with different catalyst preparation protocols Furthermore, the intern will also be introduced to the various characterization techniques for analyzing prepared catalysts. In addition, it would be required of the intern to conduct a Life Cycle Assessments (LCA) spanning the project’s entire lifecycle to assess the potential environmental impacts of products/byproducts, process, and possible design of disposal systems. Finally, he/she will prepare a report based on the work performed and make an oral presentation of his/her work to at least 25-30 scientists/students working in the area of Catalysis and Chemical Engineering. Presently, Chinmoy is working on conducting process feasibility of his own laboratory developed processes for biofuel production. He will be working closely with the intern by providing the necessary guidelines and information regarding process development, process economics and environmental impact analysis. The successful intern should have Chemical Engineering (3rd or 4th year) background, sound knowledge of process design (completed introductory Process Engineering, Heat Transfer, Mass Transfer, Fluid Mechanics courses), excellent data analysis, report writing and presentation skills, knowledge on process simulation packages (i.e. Aspen Plus, HYSYS) will be an asset. 1 June, 2015 30 August, 2015 University of Saskatchewan – Saskatoon Saskatchewan Ajay Dalai 0 0 null English Role of a nuclear enzyme “PARP-1” in determining the “do or die“ responses of cells to DNA damage When a cell from higher organisms, such as humans and other mammals, suffers damage to its genomic material (DNA) by endogenous agents or exogenous chemicals or radiations, it will first and foremost try to repair the damaged genome, i.e., restore it to its native state using different types of DNA repair pathways. However, if there is an overwhelming extent of DNA damage and the repair effort would be futile, there is a risk that the damaged cell may survive with a mutated genome, which can cause harm to the entire organism, for example by turning into a mutant cancerous cell. To prevent such bad outcomes, the cells of higher organisms perform an altruistic act of committing suicide or cell death in a programmed or unprogrammed manner; thus destroying the potentially harmful damaged genome along with the cell. Multiple cellular factors play an active role in these two “do or die” responses of higher organisms, and the host laboratory specializes in examining the role of a nuclear protein called poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in these two responses. PARP-1 is not present in bacteria or yeast but is present in cells of higher organisms including human and other mammalian cells. This evolutionary quirk also indicates a unique role of PARP-1 in the cellular responses of higher organisms to DNA damage. The basic response of PARP-1 to the damaged genome is fairly simple: as soon as it senses the damage to the genome, it binds to the damaged site on DNA and gets strongly activated within seconds to manufacture a large number of branched-chain product called polymer of ADP-ribose (PAR). The real challenge in the field is to understand how this extremely rapid activation reaction by PARP-1 controls the eventual “do or die” response of the cell to DNA damage. The host team has been examining the role of PARP-1 in these two diametrically opposite DNA repair or cell death responses for the past twenty years using a variety of old and newly developed tools, i.e., human and other mammalian cells or animals in which PARP-1 function is altered by deletion or knockdown of the gene for PARP-1 or by blocking its enzymatic activity using pharmacological inhibitors. More recently, the host team made a prestigious discovery of a novel role of PARP-1 in specific repair of DNA damage caused by solar ultraviolet radiations (Robu et al. 2013, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. (USA) 110, 1658-63). In addition, the host team has been examining on the role of PARP-1 in death of cells with damaged genome for last 2 decades and has discovered its unique novel role in causing unprogrammed necrotic death, as well as its role during programmed death by apoptosis. Current work from our team has identified many other novel functions of PARP-1 in a specific nucleotide excision pathway of DNA repair. The intern is expected to work in the ongoing projects of the graduate and post-doctoral students characterizing these novel ”do or die” functions of PARP-1 using various cellular and molecular biology techniques. The principal applicant (host) Girish Shah is a Full Professor in the Faculty of Medicine at Laval University and a senior researcher in the Hospital Research Centre of Quebec (CHU-Q). His work focuses on fundamental biomedical research to understand how human cells that sustain genetic damage will make efforts to first repair their damaged DNA and survive; failing which they will opt for the last ditch but safe response of committing “hara-kiri” or suicide so as not to harm rest of the body. The applications of these concepts are relevant in the development of cancer or in cancer therapy. The work in his team involves use of cultured cells, gene knockout and knockdown models of cells or animals, and a strong emphasis on cellular and molecular biology techniques. To get a better idea of the scope of the work, the interns are encouraged to read some of the recently published articles from Professor Shah’s team (Robu et al. 2013, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (USA), 110, 1658-63 web: http://www.pnas.org/content/110/5/1658.full.pdf. Montoni et al. (2013) Frontiers in Pharmacology, 4:18, http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fphar.2013.00018/abstract; and Shah et al (2013), Frontiers in Oncology, 3:279, http://www.frontiersin.org/Journal/FullText.aspx?s=151 In addition, Professor Shah has ongoing research collaborations with Indian Universities, which has led to many exchange students from India studying in his team from 3-6 months for research internships, and these efforts have produced data that will lead to scientific publications. His team also has students from different parts of the world, resulting in a stimulating work environment for research and education. The intern will work in host laboratory at the hospital research center of Quebec at Laval University in Quebec city. The intern will be guided by the host professor and will learn from and conduct experimental research under direct supervision of graduate and post-graduate students as well research associates in his team. The intern will participate in projects that will require him to learn and master various cellular and molecular biology techniques, such as DNA cloning, methods to knockdown genes, immunoprecipitation, Western, SouthWestern or Northern blotting, microscopic immunofluorescent visualization of proteins, affinity purifications and protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. The intern, if he/she wishes, may get an opportunity to work with ongoing work with animal models. A laboratory notebook is required to be maintained by the intern for all the research work conducted, results obtained and the conclusions drawn. The intern is also expected to read relevant literature for the project. At the end of the term, the intern will be required to summarize the work, analyze the information gathered and prepare a detailed report to be submitted to the supervisor. A suitable acknowledgment of the work by the intern will be made in future publications that use substantial part of the intern’s work. The intern is required participate in the seminar club of the laboratory or in scientific meetings (as required) to listen to the work of others and to present his/her own work to others. If given an opportunity by the supervisor, the intern is expected to present the work at local or distant scientific meetings within Canada. We are looking for an intern preferably in the last year or at the end of undergraduate studies. The intern must have bright academic records and must be enrolled in or just passed the undergraduate studies in any of the medical and biomedical disciplines, such as medicine, pharmacology, biochemistry, microbiology, cell and molecular biology, biotechnology with training in fundamental molecular and cell biology courses. The intern must have strong interpersonal skills and enjoy working in a team. A previous wet-lab research experience in biomedical laboratories will be considered a plus. 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 Université Laval – Québec City Québec Girish Shah 0 0 null English Regulation in the financial aggregation industry The research project consists in examining the financial aggregation industry - mainly institutions either banks or non-banks which collect data online, group them together and present them to customers within a single application interface. Financial aggregation is an expanding industry south of the border and has already conquered foreign markets in Europe (UK), Asia (Japan and South Korea) and Canada. Mint and Yodlee, two very well-known financial aggregators catering so far to the American public are expanding rapidly internationally. Although their international divisions are not fully-fledged yet, the increasing competition makes them more alert and ready to deploy strategies which will strengthen their operations in Canada and elsewhere. After having experienced high growth rates during the pre-financial crisis of 2007-2008, the industry has undergone significant changes in terms of structure, behavior and performance. Plagued by lack of trust on behalf of the customers and under the pressure of changing technologies and in the absence of a regulatory framework, new entrants had difficulties in penetrating the market the way have originally anticipated. In the meantime, banks and other financial institutions refined their strategies and consolidated their positions in the new emerging industry. To survive, many early entrants developed new strategies and became suppliers of technology to the banks and other financial institutions. This research explores the privacy, fraud and potential online financial risks and security issues arising from the increasing use of account aggregation services offered to consumers by a growing number of nonbank and bank aggregators. It uses a modified version of the so-called SCP (structure-conduct-performance) paradigm in order to identify the main issues to be investigated and analyze them in detail with the objective to understand thoroughly the structure of the aggregation industry, the conduct of financial aggregators and their respective performance. To further explore the behavior of individuals who use the financial aggregation services online, a questionnaire will be designed and distributed to Canadian and international users. The results of the findings will be compared to the results available from recent similar studies realized chiefly in the US. I'm working in the area of regulation of public utilities and of the financial industry. The financial sector is undergoing important changes because of the financial crises and/or the advent of disruptive technologies which affect the behavior of customers and investors. New rivals appear - the financial aggregators - who exert pressure for changing the traditional boundaries of traditional industries. These are new areas of research with important ramifications on industry, regulators and society. The research analyzes the trends of the financial aggregation industry in Canada and internationally and examines the issues of privacy, fraud and security with the purpose to design a regulatory framework which will provide incentives for greater security online. Public utilities - electricity, gas, telecommunications, transport and the regulation of the financial sector are opening up to competition but they are increasingly regulated by independent regulators. I make comparative studies in various jurisdictions and international comparisons on the issues related to market design, competition in the markets, the establishment of regulatory frameworks, and the design of optimal models of regulation which provide incentives for investment in infrastructure. Regional integration of energy markets and its impact on the environment, regulation, competition and pricing are also subjects of research. Power Pools and their functioning in Europe, North America, China, Brazil and elsewhere are also investigated. The use of financial instruments, like options, swaps, futures and forwards for hedging purposes and their impact on the cost of capital and regulation are the subjects of interest. The student will assist the professor in the review of the literature by finding articles and writing brief descriptions of their main findings. The student will research various data banks and find useful data to be used in our research. The student will also administer two questionnaires, one for the industry and another for the users of financial aggregation services. The answers will be codified and indices will be created to be used for making a quantitative analysis of the results. The student will use Excel and programing to analyze the data. Finally, the student will participate in meetings and team conversations and exchange of information. The student will have the opportunity to participate in various academic and industry seminars in Sherbrooke, Montreal and possibly Toronto. Good knowledge of economics and finance concepts. Familiarity with the usual computer programs (Office Suite) and excellent knowledge of EXCEL. Good knowledge of econometrics and familiarity with data banks. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 Université de Sherbrooke – Sherbrooke Québec Anastassios Gentzoglanis 0 1 OPC Canada English Trainee position within the industrial Pfizer / UdeS Chair on process analysis (PAT) in pharmaceutical engineering technologies Pfizer/Université de Sherbrooke Industrial Chair on PAT in pharmaceutical engineering The internship will be offered in the framework of the Pfizer/Université de Sherbrooke industrial chair on process analytical technology (PAT) in pharmaceutical engineering. Led by Professors Nicolas Abatzoglou and Ryan Gosselin, this chair has the following objectives:  Develop knowledge of: 1) the physical and chemical phenomena governing the behavior of processes involved in the production of pharmaceutical products, and 2) the criteria surrounding technology transfer based on phenomenological models or mathematics (e.g. the scaling and the introduction of new technologies);  Implement improved processes and products based on PAT monitoring and control;  Train highly qualified personnel, both in academia and industry;  Build a critical research mass in the field of pharmaceutical process monitoring at the Department of Chemical Engineering at Université de Sherbrooke. Ryan Gosselin is an engineer and assistant professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology Engineering from Sherbrooke University. He is a member of the Research Group on Technologies and pharmaceutical Processes (GRTP-P) and the University Centre GREEN-TPV (Research Group on Energy and Environment - Green Technologies and Processes). His expertise lies in the field of industrial process optimization using multivariate data analysis methods. His current research includes: • Process Analytical Technolgies (PAT) in the pharmaceutical industry mainly applied to divided solids. • The stochastic imaging of industrial processes applied to the pharmaceutical and metallurgical industries. Nicolas Abatzoglou is an engineer and professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology Engineering from Sherbrooke University. He is the director of the Research Group on Technologies and pharmaceutical Processes (GRTP-P), and Director of the University Centre GREEN-TPV (Research Group on Energy and Environment - Green Technologies and Processes ). He is the principal investigator of two projects and national coordinator (Leader) Theme of the thermochemical conversion of BioFuelNet network Network of Centres of Excellence and the theme "Fuel Pretreatment" of SOFC Canada Network National Network on fuel cell solid electrolyte. His expertise lies in the analysis of divided solids (particulate) in reactive and non-reactive environments. His current research regarding the project area are: (a) PAT divided solids (b) rheological studies of powders, granules and nano-suspensions, (c) nano-catalyst in reactors 2-φ bed fixed and 3-φ (bubbling in suspensions). The candidate will be responsible for providing technical support to various development projects related to the work undertaking within the Chair. Reporting to the Chair and Senior Scientist at Pfizer, the candidate will, more specifically:  Develop strategies and practical applications related to the use of new PATs. These include determining the feasibility of using certain monitoring tools (e.g. ; new spectral probe) to monitor a pharmaceutical unit operation;  Develop experimental designs for projects and carry out the experiments;  Develop and optimize robust processes;  Depending on results, the candidate will work to transfer lab-scale monitoring tools to production-scale applications and may even be asked to coordinate technology transfer to industrial sites;  Write reports.  The trainee must have a background in engineering; industrial chemistry or any field closely linked to pharmaceutical engineering;  The trainee must have a strong mathematical background and be proficient in programming (Matlab);  Good knowledge of the English language is essential. Knowledge of the French language is considered an asset. 1 May, 2015 1 September, 2015 Université de Sherbrooke – Sherbrooke Québec Ryan Gosselin 0 1 Pfizer Canada English Physiologic, Environmental and Nutrition Determinants of Food Intake and Glycemic Control in Children The origins of the current obesity epidemic start in early life. The 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey reported that the number of overweight/obese adolescents aged 12-17 years has more than doubled since 1978/79. Obese children are at high risk of becoming obese adults and suffering from chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, stroke and diabetes. In 2001, the associated economic cost of obesity was $4.3 billion demonstrating the costly impact of an unhealthy population on Canada’s health care burden. Screen time activities have been identified as one of the etiological factors contributing to obesity in children. It is unknown if this is due to decreased physical activity or increased energy intake. Given that these activities are common in the pre-meal environment, it is imperative to determine how they affect hunger and food intake. We recently reported that glucose suppressed short-term food intake and pre-meal video game playing lead to increased mealtime satiation in normal weights boys. An ongoing study in our laboratory will examine if these effects are different in overweight/obese boys. Physically active video games have been suggested as healthy alternatives to sedentary video games but studies on their efficiency are limited in children. The objective of the current study is to investigate the effect of active video game playing before mealtime on children’s subjective appetite and food intake following the consumption of a glucose preload. Normal weight, overweight, and obese boys and girls in the age range of 9 to 14 years will consume a glucose preload and play a physically active video game on Nintendo® Wii for 30 minutes prior to meal consumption. Energy intake will be measured at the meals. As the causes of obesity remain undefined, the potential benefits from this study will be a better understanding of the regulation of food intake in children. In addition, we believe that there is a potential to provide evidence based guidelines on children’s video game use for managing overeating at mealtime. Our research program focuses exclusively on the determinants of overeating and obesity in children by identifying the physiologic and environmental determinants that control appetite and food intake, and leading to positive energy balances. Our Food Intake Regulation Satiety Testing (FIRST) Laboratory is the only research facility in Canada dedicated to this area of research. We have a fully equipped satiety testing and exercise physiology laboratory, and a large experimental kitchen for developing food formulations. In addition, we have taken a leadership role in this area of research by validating many of the study protocols and test instruments that are employed by other research laboratories. At Penn State, I advanced my understanding in the area of girls and women’s health where I studied the role of menstrual cycle disturbances on bone health and markers of energy balance. At SickKids Hospital in Toronto, I led studies related to obesity and gastrointestinal hormone physiology in adolescent gastric bypass patients. Since 2009, I have led an independent, externally funded research program from both Federal and Agri-Food industry sources, published 13 papers (12 others in preparation), have 9 active randomized clinical trials related to food intake regulation in children, and approximately 50 high-quality personnel have received training in FIRST Lab integrating biological, behavioral, and environmental approaches to study energy intake and energy balance in children. In summary, I have an emerging record of excellence in the study of food intake regulation in children, and have completed many studies employing all the methods and test instruments in the proposed studies. Reporting directly to the research associate, you will provide assistance to the applied research team and participate in development of project study designs. As part of an interdisciplinary team, you will learn basic laboratory practices central to clinical nutrition research including anthropometrics, food preparation, fitness testing, running experimental sessions, data input and analysis, and literature review. You will have the opportunity to work with a special pediatric population. You will be expected to present your progress during weekly laboratory meetings and contribute to final written and oral reports for scientific and lay audiences including manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals. The ideal candidate will have completed courses in nutrition and exercise physiology, and will have completed at least one research methods course and have previous experience working with children. The candidate must have strong written and verbal communication skills, especially in the explanation of complex concepts to a non-technical audience. Proficiency in Microsoft Office is required, and experience using statistical software would be helpful. The candidate must have exceptionally strong conceptual, analytical and problem solving skills. A track record of excellence in meeting program objectives and deadlines is an expectation of the position. 1 May, 2015 1 August, 2015 Ryerson University – Toronto Ontario Nick Bellissimo 0 0 null English Optrode-based optofluidic sensor The project will focus on the development of an optofluidic-based label-free sensor through the integration of microfluidics with optrodes. The optofluidic sensors will consist of low-cost microstructured silica optical fibres. Photonic-crystal fibres made from microstructured synthetic fused silica have been used as sensors in a wide variety of applications including biomolecular recognition. This project aims to (i) develop sol-gel technique to create a thin film of a functionalized colloidal agent in the microstructured fibre and (ii) to integrate the sensing element into a microfluidic platform. The role of the microfluidics in the optofluidic platform will be to convey the fluid containing the analyte to the detection point. The characteristic small footprint of the fibres will facilitate the integration of multiple detectors within the same microfluidic chip to enable multiplexed detection. Additionally, the optrodes will be tested not only as detectors, but also as entire optofluidic systems, using the microstructures in the fibre as microchannels. Specific tasks for the student will include: (1) optical testing (hands-on training) of commercial microstructured silica optical fibres; (2) coating of the optical fibres with nanoparticles through sol-gel techniques; (3) optical testing of the nanoparticle-coated fibres in the detection of changes in refractive index changes of the solution in contact with the fibre; (4) integration of the fibre into microfluidic platforms designed and manufactured in our lab; (5) estimation of the production cost of the integrated optofluidic platform. The student will dedicate 3 weeks to acquire or reinforce the optics-related lab experience and sol-gel fabrication techniques required for the specific tasks of the project, 5 weeks to fabricate and test the nanoparticle-coated fibres, 3 weeks in the integration with microfluidics and 1 week for the production cost estimate. The student is expect5ed to work under the supervision of the researcher but also in collaboration with postdocs and PhD students from Queen’s University. Two potential participating universities in Mexico and Brazil that could provide the ideal candidate have been identified: Universidad de Salamanca (Mexico) and Universidade Federal de Pelotas (Brazil). I specialize in combination of microfluidics with optics, also referred to as optofluidics, for sensing applications and single-cell studies. My research approach includes the design of optofluidic sensing platforms through the generation of CAD models and computer-based simulations; fabrication of the platforms through micro- and nanofabrication techniques; and experimentation. For sensing applications, I mainly focus on label-free detection through surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using metallic nanostructures, which clusters several experimental techniques and the analysis of fundamental problems at the micro- and nanoscale. In the past, I have contributed with the development of a novel biochemical sensing approach that enables improved response time and sensitivity. My experiments provided the first demonstration of flow-through nanohole array sensing and a six-fold improvement in sensor response. Through subsequent theoretical, scaling and computational analyses, I quantified the benefits of the flow-through nanohole sensing format. Including both molecular transport and binding kinetics, the flow-through format was found to offer up to 20-fold improvement in response time for typical biomolecules, demonstrating its potential for biomedical diagnostics. For cell studies, I focus on the development of technology to interrogate single-cells in microfluidic environments. To this area, I have contributed with research on new techniques for permanently disrupting the cellular membrane of cells, and with the development of microstructured biosensors for pharmacokinetics studies through the assessment of bio-mechanical forces exerted by mammalian cells. Specific tasks for the student will include: (1) optical testing (hands-on training) of commercial microstructured silica optical fibres; (2) coating of the optical fibres with nanoparticles through sol-gel techniques; (3) optical testing of the nanoparticle-coated fibres in the detection of changes in refractive index changes of the solution in contact with the fibre; (4) integration of the fibre into microfluidic platforms designed and manufactured in our lab; (5) estimation of the production cost of the integrated optofluidic platform. The student will dedicate 3 weeks to acquire or reinforce the optics-related lab experience and sol-gel fabrication techniques required for the specific tasks of the project, 5 weeks to fabricate and test the nanoparticle-coated fibres, 3 weeks in the integration with microfluidics and 1 week for the production cost estimate. Required: knowledge in optics; hands-on lab experience including microscopy techniques, instrumentation (electrical circuits and electronics) and bench chemistry; experience with data acquisition systems and software (e.g. LabView); and hands-on experience with lasers. Desirable: theoretical and experimental knowledge in photonics; hands-on experience in microfabrication techniques. 1 May, 2015 31 August, 2015 Queen's University – Kingston Ontario Carlos Escobedo 0 0 null English Nanomechanics of graphene-polymer nanocomposites Graphene nanocomposites show hold great promise as materials for superior energy storage, e.g. batteries; for building strong and light-weight structures, e.g. wind turbine blades into batteries and for biomedical applications. However, their thermomechanical properties have not been investigated thoroughly. In this project we will investigate these material properties through computational materials engineering (CME) methodology. Since the length scale of concern in such systems is nanometer, our focus will be to understand underlying material behavior at the atomic scale. Towards this end, large scale 3D molecular dynamics (MD) simulations will be conducted in order to investigate the fundamental failure mechanisms in these systems. Our particular attention will be the polymer/graphene interaface properties. This project will provide insights into how these novel material systems can be utilized into practical usage. Computational materials engineering (CME) has quickly emerged as an indispensible tool to understand fundamental material behavior and design next generation material systems. It can help solve many of grand challenges facing humankind in the 21st Century. The core themes of our lab's research are: (a) Design and development of ultra-strong, ultra-light materials for future aerospace, automotive and energy technologies, (b) Multi-scale modeling of thermo-mechanical behavior of novel carbon-based materials and systems (graphene, nano-composites etc.), and (c) Computer aided design of next generation hydrogen production and energy storage materials and devices. We utilize a combination of state-of-the-art atomistic modeling and continuum modeling techniques to investigate material behavior at multiple length and time scales. A significant emphasis is on the validation of our computer models through experimental collaborations, and physical realization of our suggested novel material designs through industrial collaborations. Material systems of interest include nano-crystalline and nano-structured materials, graphene, carbon nanotubes, photocatalytic materials, age hardened alloys, energy storage materials, polymer matrix composites and bio-materials. We study research problems and underlying fundamental aspects related to atomic scale fracture, fatigue and damage failure of materials, dislocation, grain boundary engineering, precipitation hardening, irradiation hardening, design optimization and computational design of materials. Applications of research include nanotechnology, aerospace and automotive sectors, energy storage and sensing devices. The student is expected to work in close coordination with a graduate student in the supervisor’s CME lab. The summer student will focus on the molecular dynamics investigation of the thermomechanical behavior of polymer/graphene interface. They are expected to report the research progress regularly to the project supervisor and learn the essential research skills. The student should be vigilant and should be able to grasp information from all sources of literature before they start modeling. During the course of modeling and analysis, they should consider all the important parameters mentioned in the project proposal and analyze them thoroughly. The student is also expected to interact with other undergraduate students and faculty members in the department and the university at large. Towards the end of his/her internship, the student will be advised to present his project results to the University of Toronto research community. Publication into high quality journals will be considered a worthy achievement. The student must have materials/mechanics/physics background. A basic working knowledge of molecular dynamics, density functional theory or any other atomistic modeling technique will be considered as a plus. During the course of the project, the student will be thoroughly trained in the state-of-the-art atomistic modeling techniques. Both theoretical and hands-on training will be targeted. 1 May, 2015 15 August, 2015 University of Toronto – Toronto Ontario Chandra Veer Singh 0 0 null English Ultrastrong, ultralight nanocrystalline hybrid materials for future aerospace technologies While nanocrystalline metals and alloys have shown substantial enhancements in strength and hardness, improvements in ductility have been rather disappointing. Recently, Prof. Hibbard's group in our department at University of Toronto has developed novel hybrid nanocrystalline microtruss materials with significantly improved strength and elongation to failure while maintaining light-weight advantage. However, to realize the full potential of the proposed material systems, their failure characteristics need to be properly established. Experimental observations suggest that a complex set of mechanisms such as inelastic buckling, nanocrystalline sleeve fracture, and plastic wrinkling cause material failure at multiply connected length and time scales. The long-term goal of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of failure mechanisms at the atomic-scale using molecular dynamics. The plan is to connect atomic scale modeling to the macro-scale through cohesive zone laws. Large-scale atomistic simulations will be conducted to evaluate material properties inaccessible to experiments and to derive these cohesive laws. The summer project will be part of the above larger research activity, and will be focused more on molecular dynamics investigation of failure in these material systems. Computational materials engineering (CME) has quickly emerged as an indispensible tool to understand fundamental material behavior and design next generation material systems. It can help solve many of grand challenges facing humankind in the 21st Century. The core themes of our lab's research are: (a) Design and development of ultra-strong, ultra-light materials for future aerospace, automotive and energy technologies, (b) Multi-scale modeling of thermo-mechanical behavior of novel carbon-based materials and systems (graphene, nano-composites etc.), and (c) Computer aided design of next generation hydrogen production and energy storage materials and devices. We utilize a combination of state-of-the-art atomistic modeling and continuum modeling techniques to investigate material behavior at multiple length and time scales. A significant emphasis is on the validation of our computer models through experimental collaborations, and physical realization of our suggested novel material designs through industrial collaborations. Material systems of interest include nano-crystalline and nano-structured materials, graphene, carbon nanotubes, photocatalytic materials, age hardened alloys, energy storage materials, polymer matrix composites and bio-materials. We study research problems and underlying fundamental aspects related to atomic scale fracture, fatigue and damage failure of materials, dislocation, grain boundary engineering, precipitation hardening, irradiation hardening, design optimization and computational design of materials. Applications of research include nanotechnology, aerospace and automotive sectors, energy storage and sensing devices. The student is expected to work in close coordination with a PhD student (Mr. Matthew Daly) on molecular dynamics investigation of failure in nanocrystalline hybrid materials. They are expected to report the research progress regularly to the project supervisor and learn the essential research skills. The student should be vigilant and should be able to grasp information from all sources of literature before they start modeling. During the course of modeling and analysis, they should consider all the important parameters mentioned in the project proposal and analyze them thoroughly. The student is also expected to interact with other undergraduate students and faculty members in the department and the university at large. Towards the end of his/her internship, the student will be advised to present his project results to the University of Toronto research community. Publication into high quality journals will be considered a worthy achievement. The student must have materials/mechanics/physics background. A basic working knowledge of molecular dynamics, density functional theory or any other atomistic modeling technique will be considered as a plus. During the course of the project, the student will be thoroughly trained in the state-of-the-art atomistic modeling techniques. Both theoretical and hands-on training will be targeted. 1 May, 2015 15 August, 2015 University of Toronto – Toronto Ontario Chandra Veer Singh 0 0 null English ALTAIR Dark Energy Analysis and Instrumentation Development We request a student to join the international ALTAIR team (http://projectaltair.org), in which s/he would play a major role both in the development of propulsion for future ALTAIR payloads, and in the operations of present ALTAIR flights over several major astronomical observatories. Propulsion will very greatly benefit future ALTAIR flights, as having the ability to modify the path of the flights will allow us to pass directly in front of type Ia supernovae in telescope images, rather than merely nearby, which will allow us to more precisely calibrate the magnitude of the supernovae (as well as other astronomical sources, including white dwarf stars and other sources which require precise photometric calibration). ALTAIR is a collaboration of 4 Canadian universities and 2 U.S. universities, plus NRC and NIST, and we launch flights approximately monthly during the summer months. The monthly balloon launches and payload recoveries each require a small team of students, staff, and faculty, and are a fun and exciting way to get started with ALTAIR. Analysis of the observation and telemetry data, in order to obtain precise photometry of supernovae and other astronomical sources, brings students into the heart of the scientific analysis required to obtain required results, and the associated systematic and statistical uncertainties with each measurement. The development of instrumentation and software for future ALTAIR flights is necessary for the continued improvement of ALTAIR, and for improvements in the precision of the measurements that ALTAIR enables, and is another great way for students, especially students with backgrounds in engineering, to improve their skills and gain experience working with a major scientific collaboration, while still playing a major hands-on role in developing primary parts of the actual instrumentation and software used for scientific measurement. Instrumentation development will be in collaboration with our industrial partner, World Star Technologies in Toronto, which provides the (cooled and fiber-coupled) laser diode light sources for ALTAIR. Understanding the nature of dark energy, the mysterious substance that permeates the universe, contains over 2/3 of the total mass-energy of the universe, and is causing the expansion of the universe to accelerate, is one of the primary open problems in astronomy and cosmology (and in all of science). The astrophysics, engineering, and technology required to understand dark energy, and whether it has been constant throughout the history of the universe, or if it has changed over cosmic time, requires both astronomical data analysis, combined with key developments in aeronautical engineering, in order to eliminate the largest uncertainty on the present measurements of dark energy, which is due to measurements of the magnitude (i.e. the brightness) of type Ia supernovae. The most promising way to sharply reduce uncertainties on supernova magnitude measurements is to fly very small, precisely-calibrated light sources on small high-altitude balloons above astronomical observatories, to very precisely measure the brightness of stars and supernovae that the balloons fly past (before returning the payload light sources to earth via parachute). The ALTAIR collaboration (http://projectaltair.org), an international collaboration funded by multiple federal agencies in Canada and the U.S., which we lead, launches these small high-altitude balloons multiple times per year over major astronomical observatories such as Pan-STARRS in Hawaii and LSST in Chile. We are looking for a student to help with an upgrade of ALTAIR so that we can perform more flights to provide even more precise calibration, and thus improve the world’s understanding of dark energy. The student will be first introduced to ALTAIR by participating in the balloon launch, and the payload recovery, of one of our monthly high-altitude balloon flights. This will give the student the initial hands-on experience required to better understand the data analysis to provide precise photometry of the astronomical sources on the telescope images in which we observe the ALTAIR light source, as well as experience necessary for assisting with the development of instrumentation for future ALTAIR flights. We will introduce the student to the present ALTAIR 3-D solid model, and the present software for data analysis, and point out areas (such as the development of propulsion), which could use improvement. The student will then have a choice on what specific task to work on for the remainder of the summer: improvement of the instrumentation for future ALTAIR flights, or improvement of the data analysis software chain, and with our help and guidance, s/he will make a major contribution to the future success of ALTAIR, and be an author on ALTAIR publications. The continued success of all of our students is a foremost priority for us, and we are very proud to say that previous ALTAIR summer students of ours have done extremely well: three of our former summer students are graduate students at McGill, one at University of Cambridge, one at the University of Chicago, one at the Perimeter Institute MSc program, and one at Toronto. We are also very proud to say that each one of those students has been a major author on at least one ALTAIR journal publication, and we intend to also continue that tradition with our future MITACS Globalink undergraduate. We are extremely interested in a student who has a background in aeronautical and/or space engineering, together with at least an interest in astronomy and/or astrophysics, to work with us on ALTAIR. Useful skills include programming experience, and knowledge of computer-aided design (in SolidWorks, or SolidEdge, or equivalent 3D modeling software). 1 May, 2015 31 August, 2015 University of Victoria – Victoria British Columbia Justin Albert 0 1 World Star Technologies English Characterization of blood storage lesions using photoacoustic technologies There is a significant clinical need for blood products used in blood transfusions. Typical clinical situations where blood is needed include traumatic or surgical bleeding, anemias and diseases that affect hemoglobin production. The Canadian Blood Services collects approximately 850,000 units of blood that are administered to thousands of patients each year. Blood is typically stored for about 42 days. Increasing evidence suggests that significant alterations occur in the structure and function of red blood cells (RBC) during this storage period, and that the transfusion of RBC that have been stored for this or longer periods of time may increase patient morbidity and mortality, especially in vulnerable patient populations. A technique that could rapidly characterize the suitability of stored RBCs could potentially have a significant impact on clinical practice but also serve as a tool to assess the blood quality in the development of new blood storage protocols. We have recently discovered a new technique for the rapid characterization of red blood cells that analyzes the frequencies of the sound waves produced when red blood cells are exposed to short pulses of laser light. In this technique, which is based on the photoacoustic effect, conventional optical spectroscopy (which provides functional information about the cell) is combined with ultrasound radiofrequency spectroscopy (which provides structural information about the cell), to assess the RBC suitability for transplantation. This novel technique can also be adapted to study other forms of red blood cell pathology. In this work, we propose to develop protocols that will allow the rapid characterization of blood products that are required for blood transfusions. We will test the system suitability by comparing the results of our analytical techniques to standards used in the characterization of blood and develop a prototype system that will enable the rapid characterization of large numbers of RBC. Dr. Michael Kolios is a Canada Research Chair that heads a laboratory in the Physics Department at Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada. Medical Physics and Biomedical engineering are the main areas of Departmental interest. Dr Kolios's lab consists of 20 people with differing scientific backgrounds, creating a multidisciplinary environment. Students (graduate and undergraduate) and technical staff work on ultrasound and opto-acoustic imaging with access to state of the art facilities (http://goo.gl/Wk1EL1). The imaging systems are primarily used to monitor the viability and changing properties of tissue and cells. One of the high frequency ultrasound / photoacoustic imaging systems is a unique SASAM operating up to 2GHz (Kibero GmbH, Saarbrücken - a spin off from Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT). This is one of the only machines in the world that can produce 1GHz opto-acoustic images (http://goo.gl/ejzZre). There is also a staffed biology lab which maintians blood products for the experiments proposed in this work, and which grows several cancer cell lines to provide individual cells, cell suspensions, cell pellets and tissue engineered constructs to be used by the various imaging systems. Weekly group seminars are held with to inform the group about the various research projects and to create interdisciplinary exchange and graduate students that are working towards their MSc or PhD degrees as well as post-doctoral fellows and other research staff participate. Dr. Kolios has extensive research and development collaboration projects with research clinical institutes and industrial centers in Canada and abroad. The student will use the spectrophotometer to measure blood optical properties as a function of time in storage. the student will betray her position of this data, and will work with a graduate student that will be performing the photoacoustic imaging as to rapidly acquire the data stored blood. Moreover, the student will design some of the experiments, make tissue equivalent materials ( called phantoms in medical physics ) and collect the data. Comparisons of the various methods by which the data are acquired will be made. The student working on this application will require good laboratory skills, and we are rudimentary programming skills to automate the experiments performed. the study is ideally a student in biophysics or biomedical engineering. The student will develop skills in optoacoustic imaging, optical spectroscopy and biomedical imaging and therapy. Peer reviewed publications from the group can be found at: http://web.physics.ryerson.ca/mkolios/publications/index.html. 1 May, 2015 1 September, 2015 Ryerson University – Toronto Ontario Michael Kolios 0 0 Canadian Blood Services English Optical Fiber Space Division Multiplexing based MIMO Wireless Distribution for Cloud Radio Access Networks Explosive growth of wireless communications traffic for radio access network presents technical challenges in wireless signal distribution. Digital optical transmission technology has been widely used at present macro cell wireless signal distribution, but it may not be a sustainable technology for small cell wireless. This is because antenna sites are complicated such as digital to analog conversion and signal processing etc., and also digital optical transmission is not transparent to wireless RF carrier frequencies and bit rates, thus costly, and high energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to have a low-cost and sustainable broadband wireless signal distribution technology for current and future wireless. In addition, to have dynamic traffic loads from time to time, cloud radio access networks (C-RAN) combined with MIMO wireless (MIMO-multiple input multiple output) has been proposed for the next generation of wireless access networks. Cloud radio access networks consist of two parts: back-haul and front-haul, in which back-haul networks are based on digital optical transmission, while front-haul networks can be based on either digital optical fiber transmission or analog optical transmission (radio over fiber). As pointed above, digital optical transmission based front-haul is not considered sustainable. Instead, radio over fiber based front-haul will simplify the radio access networks and also is transparent to RF carriers and bit rates. Unfortunately, radio over fiber is analog optical transmission, susceptible to nonlinear distortion. On the other hand, MIMO wireless has been proposed and will be utilized widely in the future wireless, such as 5G. Presently, there are no simple technologies to support the distribution of MIMO wireless signals. Optical fiber space division multiplexing has been just proposed for high speed optical communications. When using multi-mode fiber, the space division multiplexing can be realized by mode division multiplexing. In the mode-division multiplexing, mode coupling is the major technical limit for MIMO radio over fiber based front-haul transmission. The research topics in this project: 1) Broadband digital pre / post -distortion circuit and design of analog pre-distortion circuit Investigate circuit topologies of analog pre-distortion circuits that can inhibit third order nonlinear distortion, to achieve spurious free dynamic range improvement of over 10 dB . Taking into account the existing systems and future applications 5G and other millimeter-wave systems, he or she will study the analog 0-10GHz ,20-30GHz and 70-80GHz 3 bands predistortion circuit . Digital pre -distortion is applied to the Front-haul down-links, digital post-distortion is applied to the up-links. Both pre and post distortion will suppress second and third order nonlinear distortion. Digital distortion will be based on base band signal processing. 2) MIMO optical transmission supported MIMO wireless front-haul systems He or she will investigate and simulate MIMO optical transmission for MIMO radio over fiber signals. Dr. Zhang's research topics are: 1. Enabling technologies for wireless signal distribution in cloud radio access networks Dr. Zhang has conducted this research for about 10 years. He is a world leader in radio over fiber transmission that is considered a sustainable technology for broadband wireless access networks. For this part of research, he has been mainly focused on linearization and optical transmission technologies etc. In the linearization technologies, he mainly focuses on analog and digital pre-distortion circuits and digital post distortion circuits. In optical transmission, he is considering optical fiber mode division multiplexing to support MIMO wireless, i.e. optical MIMO to support wireless MIMO. This technology has not been investigated yet in the world. 2. InP quantum dot lasers Dr. Zhang is focusing on InP quantum dot lasers for multi-wavelength lasers, and mode-locked lasers. InP quantum dot lasers can emit tens of modes or beams that do not have mode partition limit, thus the lasers can be used for multi-wavelength beam lasers. The research includes dynamics, optical bandwidth, and noise of the lasers. In addition, when the driving current is certainly high, the above lasers become mode-locked lasers, emitting short pulses (hundreds of femtosecond pulse width). This research includes investigation of mode-locking mechanisms. 3. InP uni-traveling carrier photodiodes This research mainly focuses on broadband and high power photodiodes, and the goals are 500 GHz in bandwidth and 100 mW in output power. This research involves in design of the photodiode structures and characterization of the fabricated photodiodes. Student 1: Investigate digital pre-distortion and post-distortion algorithms based on base band signal processing. The algorithms they find can be used to suppress both 3rd and 2nd order nonlinear distortion in both radio over fiber transmission and wireless transmission. Student 2: Investigate MIMO radio over fiber transmission using mode division multiplexing in a multi-mode fiber, to support MIMO wireless systems. This student will be also involved in design of analog pre-distortion circuits. 1. Signal processing for digital pre/post- distortion 2. microwave circuits 3. Communication theory 4. Optical fiber communications 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 Concordia University – Montréal Québec (John) Xiupu ZHANG 0 0 null English Punching Shear Behaviour of FRP‐Reinforced Concrete Slab‐Column Connections The main objective of this research program is to investigate, experimentally and analytically, the effect of different parameters on the shear behaviour of FRP‐reinforced concrete slab‐column connections under both monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. The objective of the experimental phase is to generate an urgently needed test data, where virtually no data is available, and to evaluate the effects of the FRP reinforcement type, ratio and layout in both longitudinal and transverse directions in addition to type of loading and concrete strength on the behaviour of such connections. While the objective of the analytical phase is to formulate a non‐linear mathematical model for the ultimate capacity of slab‐column joints to simulate the basic mechanisms of flexure and shear transfer in the joint zone and to implicitly account for the bond characteristics of FRP bars and the effect of reversed‐cyclic loading and presence of FRP shear reinforcement. A total of 12 full‐scale slab‐column interior connections totally reinforced with GFRP bars will be constructed and tested. The slab measures 27002700200 mm with a central square column (250250 mm) that extends 1200 mm below and above the slab. The connections will be tested under monotonic loads taking into consideration the unbalanced moment transfer (due to gravity loads only) with a constant moment‐toshear ratio of approximately 0.25. The main test parameters include 1) flexural (tension) reinforcement ratio and layout ‐ ratios ranging from light (0.5%) to heavy (2.0%) and concentration of slab top reinforcement in bands around the column); 2) adding transverse FRP shear reinforcement; 3) slab thickness – commonly used 200 mm and relatively thick (300 mm); and 4) column aspect ratio (rectangularity) – ranging from 1.0 (square column) to 3.0 (rectangular). This research project will generate urgently needed data for understanding the behaviour and providing design formulas for slab‐column connections reinforced with FRP bars under various loading conditions. Thus, it will contribute to the development of durable and maintenance‐free concrete structures, which will cut a significant amount of the maintenance and rehabilitation cost. The corrosion problem of steel reinforcing bars is the greatest factor in limiting the life expectancy of reinforced concrete (RC) structures. One promising solution to the problems caused by deterioration of steel reinforcement is the use of the non‐corrodible FRP reinforcing bars in concrete. FRP materials in general offer many advantages over the conventional steel such as light weight and corrosion resistance. However, they have linear‐elastic behaviour until failure, different bond characteristics, low strength under compression and shear stresses, and a relatively‐low modulus of elasticity compared to steel. These characteristics of FRP materials make the behaviour of FRP‐RC structures different from their counterparts reinforced with steel. Structures built in harsh environments such as bridges and parking garages would be an ideal location for the use of the non‐corrodible FRP composite bars. In North America, many of the RC parking structures is constructed using flat slabs directly supported on columns. The vicinity of the column is the zone where transverse shear stresses, ultimately cause punching shear failure, are the largest. For a flat plate floor system subjected to uneven gravity loads, the transverse shear stresses, in the vicinity of a column, are caused not only by concentrated loads but also by moments that must be transferred between a slab and a column. These moments can be increased significantly under the application of lateral loads as a result of wind or earthquake action. Furthermore, punching shear failure is usually brittle, sudden and catastrophic in nature and, therefore, it should be certainly avoided. This research project, which is funded by NSERC, is conducted by a PhD student and the Globalink student will be helping (and sometimes taking a leading role) in the following tasks: 1‐ Preparation of test specimens including the installation of the innovative FRP composite bars and strain gauges. 2‐ Preparation of test set‐up including instrumentations, data acquisition systems and hydraulic actuators. 3‐ Running the laboratory tests and collecting data. 4‐ Analyze and implement the experimental data in a written technical report format. Strong knowledge of the following: 1‐ Structural analysis and design of reinforced concrete structural elements. 2‐ Microsoft office applications (especially, excel, power point and word) 3‐ Moderate knowledge of Auto Cad 1 May, 2015 1 August, 2015 University of Manitoba – Winnipeg Manitoba Ehab El-Salakawy 0 0 null English Multi-phase Process Engineering: Simulation, Design Optimization We currently have on-going projects in a variety of fields related to heavy oil processing and metering, multiphase neutralization, simulation of droplet dynamics with phase change and surface tension effects, and compact system design for analytical systems and small-scale chemical production. Given the lead-time of the Mitacs program, the nature of projects we have available will vary, and will be selected from on-going research based on a given candidates interests and skills. Our current Mitac's student is working on the design and fabrication of a plate-and-frame reactor platform, specifically focusing on different distributor technology and monitoring methods. Students looking for hands-on experience will be assigned to projects involving use of our on-site CNC and manufacturing capabilities to design and test new flow platforms or systems relevant to industry-sponsored projects. Students wishing to look more at simulation and modelling will focus on the application of OpenFOAM to industrially-relevant systems, simulating phenomena like two-phase separation, phase change, free surface phenomena and mass transfer systems. Multiphase systems have traditionally been viewed as processes involving mixtures of gas(es), liquid(s) and/or solid(s) where the interaction of these phases plays a significant role in behavior of the system. This definition can be extended to also include single-phase systems where physical boundaries create internal resistance to basic properties like heat and mass transfer. While common to many facets of our lives and key to industrial technology, the complexities of multi-phase systems continues to drive dynamic research and development focused on improving fundamental understanding and practical system performance. Technological advancements in this area have influenced today's landscape of medical diagnostic equipment, extraction and energy operations, environmental systems, forensic analysis methods, just to name a few. At the Lab of Multiphase Process Engineering, it is our mission to: •explore fundamental aspects of multi-phase flow in all it's facets, •assist in the practical application of emerging technology, •collaborate with industrial, commercial and government interests to address practical challenges and find efficiencies in processing systems, and to •develop practical expertise at both the undergraduate and graduate level within young engineers from all disciplines to better prepare them for opportunities both local and abroad. To achieve this mission within a diverse range of multiphase systems, our approach attempts to leverage the often extensive knowledge of our collaborators against fundamental theory and industry best-practices to find solutions which are practical, effective and economical. Depending on the project, the student will assist in the design and execution of either experiments or simulation as needed to answer empirical questions related to the specific project they've been matched with. Over the 12-week period, we expect a student to progress their project from conceptualization to physical construction and testing (or meshing, simulation and validation if simulation-based). If interests exists on the part of the student, the scope of each project will be catered to result in at least one publication submission from their work. Key factors that we look for are the ability to work independently, exercise creativity in design and care in analysis. Applicants will ideally have good communication skills and an interest in multi-phase systems (extraction, multi-phase flow, etc.), and strength in mathematical analysis. 4 May, 2015 24 July, 2015 Dalhousie University – Halifax Nova Scotia Adam Donaldson 0 0 It varies by project. With a 12 month lead time, it is difficult to provide this information in adv English Ultraviolet Photoreactors for Advanced Water Purification Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation has emerged in the past years as one of the best water purification alternatives, with many major cities in Canada, USA, and Europe adopting UV as their primary disinfection process. Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) could potentially revolutionize water treatment systems by replacing UV mercury lamps, given the trend observed in LEDs recent performance enhancement and cost reduction. The proposed project aims to develop the new generation of UV reactors operating with UV-LEDs. We will direct our efforts towards investigating the fundamentals of inactivation of various pathogens by UV-LED. Finally, we will fabricate, operate, and assess UV-LED photoreactors for water purification. My main research interests are in the computational modeling and experimental study of chemical and photochemical systems with application to energy and environmental engineering. Specific research areas include: Artificial Photosynthetic Systems: Artificial photosynthesis involves capturing energy from the sun and storing it in the form of chemical fuels. The focus of this research is to create engineered solar fuel generators for the photocatalytic production of hydrogen, a leading candidate for the fuel of the future. Our team develops photoelectrochemical cells and multifunctional photocatalysts activated by solar and ultraviolet radiation for hydrogen generation by water splitting. We design and build original photoreactors for the scalable production of hydrogen and other chemical fuels. Our target is to create sustainable ways of producing solar fuels by utilizing earth-abundant materials and cost-effective processes. Photoreactors for Water Purification: The ultraviolet (UV) reactor is today’s fastest growing water treatment technology. The primary emphasis of this research is to formulate the next generation of UV photolytic and photocatalytic reactors, by studying their fundamentals including their hydrodynamics, kinetics, and optics. We develop models of UV reactor performance and evaluate them through extensive experimental studies. Our current strategic project focuses on the development of a new generation of UV reactors operating with UV-LEDs. The research program we have been leading in this field has and will continue to have a significant impact on product development in the UV reactor industry. The student will be engaged in designing experimental apparatus, conducting experiments, and analyzing the results. Basic Chemical Engineering skills; laboratory experience/skills; Analytical skills and report writing. 4 May, 2015 25 July, 2015 University of British Columbia – Vancouver British Columbia Fariborz Taghipour 0 0 null English Computational design of efficient photocatalysts through surface modification One of the core challenges in the 21st century is providing sustainable energy to the large masses. In recent decades, technological development has focused on renewable energy sources such as solar and wind power. However, these sources cannot produce electricity at all times. A hydrogen-enabled energy economy would not suffer from this limitation. Nonetheless, an efficient large-scale production of hydrogen fuel remains a significant challenge. One state-of-the-art technology involves photocatalytic splitting of water to yield hydrogen in the presence of sun light. The efficiency of photocatalysts is currently low and significant research activities are being undertaken world-wide so as to alleviate this limitation through various approaches. This project aims to utilize the computational materials science approach to assess, design and develop novel photocatalyst material through surface modification. Development of such a material design would be instrumental in achieving the goal of a safe, economical and environmentally friendly hydrogen economy. Our focus will be on titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalysts. At first, atomic level computer simulations will be utilized to understand the electronic band structure and the photocatalytic properties of the pristine and surface modified TiO2. Thereafter, useful parametric studies will be carried out to understand the effect of important nano-structural variables and propose novel material designs with optimized water splitting capabilities. The long term plan will be to realize proposed designs through collaboration with experimentalists. Computational materials engineering (CME) has quickly emerged as an indispensible tool to understand fundamental material behavior and design next generation material systems. It can help solve many of grand challenges facing humankind in the 21st Century. The core themes of our lab's research are: (a) Design and development of ultra-strong, ultra-light materials for future aerospace, automotive and energy technologies, (b) Multi-scale modeling of thermo-mechanical behavior of novel carbon-based materials and systems (graphene, nano-composites etc.), and (c) Computer aided design of next generation hydrogen production and energy storage materials and devices. We utilize a combination of state-of-the-art atomistic modeling and continuum modeling techniques to investigate material behavior at multiple length and time scales. A significant emphasis is on the validation of our computer models through experimental collaborations, and physical realization of our suggested novel material designs through industrial collaborations. Material systems of interest include nano-crystalline and nano-structured materials, graphene, carbon nanotubes, photocatalytic materials, age hardened alloys, energy storage materials, polymer matrix composites and bio-materials. We study research problems and underlying fundamental aspects related to atomic scale fracture, fatigue and damage failure of materials, dislocation, grain boundary engineering, precipitation hardening, irradiation hardening, and computational design of materials. Applications of research include nanotechnology, aerospace and automotive sectors, energy storage and sensing devices. The summer student will use state-of-the-art atomistic modeling techniques to analyze and predict the band structure and photocatalytic properties of surface modified TiO2 and compare results against recent experimental evidence. Once the model is verified, the student will carry out parametric studies to propose new material designs. In particular, the student will investigate: (a) doping or nano-coating of the TiO2 surface, (b) modification of surface geometry by creating an amorphous layer on top portion of bulk TiO2, as suggested in a recent article published in the Science magazine (Chen et al., Science 331:746-50). The student is expected to work in close coordination with the project supervisor and learn the essential research skills. The student should be vigilant and should be able to grasp information from all sources of literature before they start modeling. During the course of modeling and analysis, they should consider all the important parameters mentioned in the project proposal and analyze them thoroughly. In the absence of the supervisor, the student will be advised by Mr. Shwetank Yadav, a graduate student in the supervisor's lab at UofT. The student is also expected to interact with other undergraduate students and faculty members. Towards the end of his/her internship, the student will be advised to present his project results to the University of Toronto research community. Publication into high quality journals will be considered a worthy achievement. The student must have materials/mechanics/physics background. A basic awareness of computational modeling, e.g. molecular dynamics, density functional theory or any other atomistic modeling technique is good and any hands-on experience will be considered as a plus. During the course of the project, the student will be thoroughly trained in the state-of-the-art atomistic modeling techniques. Both theoretical and hands-on training will be targeted. 1 May, 2015 15 August, 2015 University of Toronto – Toronto Ontario Chandra Veer Singh 0 0 null English Deterioration and Repair of Concrete Pavements This project aims at analyzing the real damage mechanisms of concrete pavements and hence improving the overall process of partial depth repair (PDR) of concrete pavements to achieve optimum performance, longevity and life-cycle cost effectiveness. The scope of work involves macro-scale and microstructural analysis of various concrete cores extracted from concrete pavements in the City of Winnipeg to investihgate the underlying damage mechanisms. It also involves evaluating the performance of different commercial repair products in comparison to novel repair mixture designs developed by the research team; these novel repair materials are based on blended binders comprising cement, fly ash and nano-particles. The laboratory program consists of tests on fresh, hardened and durability properties relevant to the performance of repair materials used in PDR of concrete pavements. These experiments are corroborated with sophisticated analytical techniques such as microscopy to reach definitive conclusions on which performance indicators obtained from standard tests are most expressive, robust and reliable, yet convenient to be implemented by practitioners and government agencies. Findings from this project will be compiled in a comprehensive Guide to PDR of Concrete Pavements (containing sections on specifications, materials selection, construction/troubleshooting procedures, etc.) which will be adopted by the Public Works Department, City of Winnipeg to effectively reduce the annual expenditures on PDR of concrete pavements. My research interests are in the area of civil engineering infrastructure from a materials perspective with emphasis on the durability, rehabilitation and sustainable development of concrete infrastructure. The international shift to performance-based standards and specifications for concrete necessitates improving the reliability of current testing standards and introducing rigorous performance-based test methods for cementitious materials. It is particularly important to reslove some key durability issues of concrete and so more reliably qualify innovative concrete mixture designs incorporating novel/smart cement-based materials such as nano-particles and recycled waste by-products, which concurrently have positive engineering and environmental effects. Improving the reliability of experimental data and understanding of combined degradation mechanisms of concrete structures will inevitably lead to appropriate selection of cementitious materials, rehabilitation strategies and preventive measures, and thus reducing life-cycle costs. In addition, significant development can be achieved in service life/life-cycle cost analyses of concrete structures, which are not adequately developed so far due to the use of unreliable data and classical-logic that has been proven incapable of describing the degradation of concrete structures affected by a multitude of aging mechanisms. Comparatively, emerging computational intelligence-based methods such as fuzzy-logic inference systems are promising tools in modeling the durability performance of concrete structures under variable environmental conditions and multiple degradation mechanisms. The trainees will be engaged in experimental work with PhD students. They will help them to conduct experiments on simulated field exposures on concrete, while monitoring the deterioration of engineering properties and microstructure. The undergraduate students will be given the opportunity to learn about advanced analytical techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. In addition, they will participate in developing novel cement-based materials incorporating nano-particles. They will also be encouraged to participate in the analysis of data and preparation of research publications. Civil engineering students, High academic credentials and achievements; fluency in written and spoken English, completed courses on civil engineering materials (especially the part on concrete materials); knowledge of computer software (AutoCad, MS Office) 15 May, 2015 15 May, 2015 University of Manitoba – Winnipeg Manitoba Mohamed Bassuoni 0 1 Public Works Department, City of Winnipeg English 2D linear array for three dimensional photoacoustic imaging Some of the the most recent coverage on the general work on blood flow and photoacoustics can be found at: http://www.physics.ryerson.ca/node/1769 and recent publications at: http://web.physics.ryerson.ca/mkolios/publications/index.html This particular project will focus on 3D photoacoustics. We have recently purchased new hardware (the Ultrasonix DAQ) that allow data acquisition of multichannel pre-beamform data of each array channel on an ultrasound with our clinical ultrasound imaging instrument. The research version of a commercial imaging scanner [Ultrasonix RP] will be used to provide real time imaging of tissue equivalent phantoms. In opto-acoustic imaging sends a short pulse of laser energy into a target which undergoes microscopic heating and expansion to create pressure waves (ultrasound) which are detected by an ultrasound transducer. This system combines the benefits of the deep penetration of ultrasound and the high contrast of the optical properties of tissue and will produce better images than either system alone. More experiments are required on phantoms, ex-vivo tissue, and in-vivo models. Programming and graphic interfaces will be used for the opto-acoustic imaging system and creating novel beam-forming algorithms. This requires programming and Electrical Engineering skills. The opto-Acoustic imaging system requires simultaneous control of the laser (which provides the illumination) and the Ultrasonix RP which is used in passive mode to detect the ultrasound and to build images. Work is required on the overall control system and more work is required on the low level control of the Ultrasonix RP imaging machines to co-ordinate their operation to that of the laser and the imaging system. Dr. Michael Kolios is a Canada Research Chair that heads a laboratory in the Physics Department at Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada. Medical Physics and Biomedical engineering are the main areas of Departmental interest. This lab consists of 14 people of differing scientific backgrounds. Students (graduate and undergraduate) and technical staff work on high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy, histotripsy (non-thermal ultrasound shock wave therapy), rheology on a cellular scale, opto-acoustic imaging and several high frequency ultrasound imaging systems. The rheology and imaging systems are primarily used to monitor the viability and changing properties of tissue and cells during chemotherapy. One of the high frequency ultrasound imaging systems is a unique SASAM operating up to 2GHz (Kibero GmbH, Saarbrücken - a spin off from Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT). This is one of the only machines in the world that can produce 1GHz opto-acoustic images. There is also a staffed biology lab which grows several cancer cell lines to provide individual cells, cell suspensions, cell pellets and tissue engineered constructs to be used by the various imaging systems. Weekly group seminars are held with to inform the group about the various research projects and to create interdisciplinary exchange and graduate students that are working towards their MSc or PhD degrees as well as post-doctoral fellows and other research staff participate. Dr. Kolios has extensive research and development collaboration projects with research clinical institutes and industrial centers in Canada and abroad. The student will program the ultrasound imaging device so as to rapidly acquire the data for three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging. Moreover, the student will design the experiments, make tissue equivalent materials ( called phantoms in medical physics ) and collect the data. Comparisons of the various methods by which the data are acquired will be made. The student working on this application will require good programming skills to access the low level functions that control the Ultrasonix RP imaging scanner to automate the experiments performed. The student will develop skills in ultrasound imaging and beamforming, optoacoustic imaging, and biomedical imaging and therapy. Peer reviewed publications from the group can be found at: http://web.physics.ryerson.ca/mkolios/publications/index.html. 1 May, 2015 1 September, 2015 Ryerson University – Toronto Ontario Michael Kolios 0 1 Ultrasonix Inc. English The development of an R package for quantitative fatty acid signature analysis While quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (or QFASA) has proven to be a useful diet estimation method, currently QFASA tools are not widely available to scientists. The goal of this research project is to begin the development of a much needed QFASA R package where existing methods are compiled and made easily accessible to biologists. Among other benefits, having such a package would allow biologists to apply current QFASA tools to a variety of data sets and practical settings while ensuring that the latest and statistically valid methods are being applied. My recent research contributions have been in the area of ecological and environmental statistics where (in collaboration with statisticians and biologists) I have been developing statistical tools for a recent diet estimation method called quantitative fatty acid signature analysis, or QFASA. Through various validation studies, QFASA has proven to be a useful method of estimating the diet of predators such as seals, seabirds and sea lions. The approach involves using statistical methods to match fatty acid signatures of predators to representative prey signatures from species potentially in the predators' diet. Both the fatty acid signatures and QFASA diet estimates are compositional (their components are proportions that sum to one) and may contain an abundance of essential, rounded and/or below detection value zeros. My research area therefore includes compositional data analysis, applied multivariate analysis and zero-inflated models. Another statistical challenge of QFASA is the problem of sample size (number of sampled predators) often being much less than the number of variables (the number of fatty acids or the number of species of prey used to obtain the diet estimates) and we have been studying nonparametric methods to handle this difficulty. We have had to devise novel methods of simulating pseudo-predators to assess our methods and I would also describe my research area as computational statistics. In addition to ecological and environmental statistics, I have worked on a variety of interdisciplinary projects in the health sciences area and, in particular, the field of gerontology. The student would be required to first review QFASA literature to gain an understanding of the methods available, and to determine (through discussions with me) what tools should be included in the R package. With my help, the student would then need to understand how the existing QFASA R code functions. Before implementing an R package, the code would need to be cleaned up by adding appropriate comments, possibly making some modifications and then testing it. There is online documentation available (including tutorials) on how to build an R package and the student would need to spend some time learning how to create a package in R. Finally, the student would begin developing a QFASA R package. The student should have a strong statistics (particularly multivariate analysis) and computer science background. The student will be programming in R and a knowledge of R would be an asset. Good writing skills are also required. Some courses in biology would be helpful but are not necessary. 18 May, 2015 18 May, 2015 University of New Brunswick – Saint John New Brunswick Connie Stewart 0 0 null English Nanostructured Sn-based Anodes for High Performance Lithium Ion Batteries There is a growing awareness that nanoscience and nanotechnology can have a profound impact on energy storage and utilization by exploiting the significant differences of energy states and transport in nanostructures and macrostructures. Nanotechnology–based solutions are being developed for a wide range of energy problems such as: solar cells, hydrogen generation and storage, fuel cells, and lithium ion batteries. Over the past few years, there has been a dramatic increase of interest in large scale batteries for energy storage, especially for the transportation sector (HEVs and EVs) and energy storage (smart grid). The lithium-ion rechargeable battery is one of the most promising power systems because it can offer a higher operative voltage and energy density than competing technologies. While there are many challenges and opportunities in developing advanced cathode materials for Li-ion batteries, in this proposal, we will focus on advanced anode materials considering the impact of the unique advantage of nanomaterials on battery performance, and apply nanotechnology to address challenges in lithium ion batteries for clean energy. The objective of this proposed research will apply nanotechnology to address the key challenges in development of high performance lithium ion batteries. We will increase the cyclabilities of Sn-based anode materials with high specific capacities and energy densities by use of nanostructure materials. Our increased understanding of the nanostructure on the electrochemical performance of Sn–based materials will help guide us in designing novel Sn-based composite anodes and improve their cycle performance as well as rate capability. It is expected that nanostructured Sn-based anode materials offer high charge/discharge kinetics and good cyclic stabilities as well as enhanced energy densities and power densities because of their high surface area for faradic reaction, good electric conductivity, short path lengths for both electronic and Li+ transport (permitting operation even with low electronic or low Li+ conductivity, or at higher power), and better accommodation of the strain of Li+ intercalation/de-intercalation. The successful completion of this innovative research project could obtain high performance lithium ion batteries; thereby accelerate the adoption of lithium ion batteries in electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The short-term objective of the proposed research program is to understand how nanostructures significantly buffer the large volume expansion/shrinkage during charge/discharge processes, resulting in enhanced cycle performance and rate capability, through synthesizing and employing Sn-based nanostructures as anodes of lithium ion batteries. The increased understanding of the influence of structure of Sn-based nanostructured anodes on their electrochemical performance will give significant guidance to design nanostructured anodes with a controlled and desired structure to obtain good cycle performance and rate capability. The long-term objective of the research is to use the obtained knowledge and understanding to design and synthesize large amount of novel nanostructured composite anodes for high performance lithium ion batteries for EV and HEV applications. This would help to make lithium ion batteries technically and economically competitive with current energy method, impelling remarkable progress of lithium ion batteries. I, one full professor at Western University, am a Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in the development of nanomaterials for clean energy. I have extensive experience in materials and surface science and, in the past ten years, and have established a remarkable track record in nanoscience and nanotechnology for clean energy, mainly in the areas of synthesis and structure control of low-dimensional nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and metal oxide nanowires, and nanocomposites with nanoparticles and nanofilms as well as their applications for fuel cells as well as Li-ion batteries. I have published 180 papers with peer-reviewed journals. I have authored or co-authored 11 patents. Recently, I co-edited a book to be titled by “Electrochemical Technologies for Energy Storage and Conversion”, which was published by Wiley-VCH in 2012. I have also written 8 chapters for 8 books. Since I joined Western in 2004, I have given 30 invited and keynote talks and around 80 presentations in international and national conferences or workshops about nanomaterials and fuel cells. My group has collaborated extensively with many organizations, e.g. Phostech Lithium Inc., General Motors Canada, Ballard Power Systems, Canadian National Defense, INCO, the Canadian Space Agency and many university groups. Currently, his group consists of twenty researchers, with thirteen Ph.D students, six PDFs and one research Engineer. My group is well equipped, from synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials to their applications to fuel cells and Li-ion batteries at the Centre of Green Technologies in a new engineering building at Western. In these 12 weeks, the applicant will be part of my research group team. My group is responsible for the applicant’s trainings including safety and research work. The applicant will apply his/her knowledge and background to do some research work related to nanostructured Sn-based anodes for lithium ion batteries. In our previous work, my group has synthesized SnO2 nanowires on carbon paper substrate by CVD technique. Carbon paper has high electrical conductivity but a high cost and poor mechanical strength, which is not suitable to application for lithium ion batteries. Therefore, we propose to use stainless steel substrates with both good mechanical strength and electrical conductivity in order to match commercial lithium ion batteries. Using similar strategy, the applicant will try to grow Sn-based anodes on stainless steel substrates. The challenges come from two aspects. Firstly, the applicant will control morphology, dimension and structure of Sn-based anodes by control of deposition temperature and reaction time. Secondly, the applicant needs, simultaneously, to control the thickness and nature (amorphous and graphite) of carbon in the composites which is introduced to increase the electrical conductivity of the anodes by deposition temperature, reaction time, the ratio and flow rate of argon gas and ethylene gas. After successful synthesis of the anodes, the applicant will involve and study the property characterization of obtained nanostructures using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field-emission SEM (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Moreover, the applicant will assemble the coin cells to evaluate the electrochemical performance of the nanostructured anodes. Various electrochemical properties techniques, including cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and battery station, will be used to evaluate the electrochemical performance, cycle performance and rate capability of the anodes. All these techniques are available at my group. The applicant should have a broad basis of knowledge in building materials and structures, and show specific skills in nanomaterials to understand and master the structure of matter down to the atomic scale, and understand the relationship between microstructure and structural and functional properties of nanomaterials. More importantly, these skills allow the potential applicant to design, transform and manufacture nanostructured materials which serve the anodes by taking into account the requirements of sustainable development of lithium ion batteries. The applicant should have some experiences of nanomaterials synthesis, and author or co-author several scientific research articles in peer-review journals. 25 June, 2015 24 September, 2015 Western University – London Ontario Xueliang Sun 0 0 null English Visual Analytics Across Multiple Dimensions Research brings together approaches from digital humanities, visual analytics, HCI, design thinking and practice and computational linguistics to provide new insights into the creation, exploration and analysis of online data and users’ behaviours. The central goal of our research is to develop tools to support media companies and other industries in transition from print to digital; or from face to face to virtual. We want to (i) better understand the differences in consumer interaction between print and digital media, or from f2f services to virtual supports (ii) facilitate better interactions with the new digital products and overall consumer experience through personalization and sentiment analysis of existing consumers, and (iii) develop visualization tools to improve management, staff and consumer understanding of the available data. In the third wave of convergence traditional media industries are undergoing tremendous disintermediation (i) as internet culture, with its history of free content, subverts traditional subscription based paper media models and (ii) as linear print moves into interactive, multi-media and social formats and as iii) vertical integration requires companies to make discretionary investments. These transformations impact every aspect of existing business models, including production, consumption, and supply chain management. Yet the same technological changes that bring about such disruption also provide potential opportunities. Similar kinds of disruptions are occurring in healthcare and education. Consumers and organizations are increasingly interested in tools and techniques that allow them to manage and visualize their own data collections, online paths and social networks and status (for example health data). These tools and their associated analytic approaches have already demonstrated value. Media industries (including companies such as the Globe and Mail and data analytics companies such as BBM Analytics and Kaypok that support them) use tools to understand, analyze and support the dramatic and disintermediating shift from print or linear media to multimedia formats with intensive user interaction. They need to build sophisticated databases, repurpose content, track digital rights, analyze user responses, often in real-time, and provide bespoke experiences and tools for subscribers across different screen platforms. They need to understand the ways that online subscribers and non-subscribers use their media in distinct ways in order to build effect tools to retain them, build advertising and brand strategy and manage their supply chain. Interestingly, similar challenges and opportunities exist in other industries, such as health care where there is demand for tools to support long-term care and aging in place. Visual analytics tools are required that provide real-time analytics on the fly on mobile platforms, as well as cross-platform analysis with archived data. Hence a component of the research will be the translation of visual analytics tools across platforms, including smart phones, tablets and stationary screen display. Understanding the aesthetics and possible expression of data through alternate means such as sonification or vibro-tactile expression is an additional aspect of our funded research as companies or institutions strive to support different kinds of users, some with disabilities or facing cognitive impairment. I am the Principal Investigator with the Visual Analytics Laboratory at OCAD University. The laboratory is a major Canada Foundation for Innovation and Centre for Information Visualization and Data Driven Design funded infrastructure that houses multiple OCAD University faculty researchers, interns, industry, health care and NFP partners. I bring almost a decade of experience in design research on mobile platforms and wearable applications of these as well as two decades of research in data visualization and visual analytics. I am co-principle investigator of the Centre for Information Visualization and Data Driven Design, York University/OCADU collaboration. My data visualization research centres on text and other communications data and includes sentiment analysis and visualization; social media visualization; ambient visualization; personal data visualization and the representation of data in the n-screen environment. I was co-Principal Researcher on two large scale mobile research networks – the Mobile Digital Commons Network (2002 - 2005) and the Am-I-Able Network (2002 – 2004) and created Mobile Experience Innovation Centre (ongoing). These projects researched and prototyped location based context aware technology and application. Current partnered research is extensive and includes media firms, health care institute in Canada and Brazil, business analytics companies and transportation industry. My research considers the aesthetic qualities of visual analytics and design process as well as the practical applications of VA. Interns will join NSERC Strategic, CRD, ORFE, and OCE funded research. The RA will assist with conducting research on the design, prototyping and evaluation of interactive tools for the visualization of data provided by the institutional and industrial partners of the Visual Analytics Lab (e.g., BBM Analytics, Globe and Mail, Baycrest). Bringing a background in computation the student will assist in the preparation of the data for visualization, the integration of design prototypes with data analytics tools and the porting of tools across a number of different platforms, such as Android tablets. The intern will be assigned questions such as: • Integrating social media tools with healthcare applications requires attention to privacy and security. Design an appropriate communication method for sharing data between these social tools and the application taking into account patterns of data sharing. • Taking into account data on the demographics of media subscribers, their dwell time on various media offerings and their attention to brand placement with articles, develop a visualization system that indicates their consumption patterns and can be used for more effective advertising placement. The RA will actively collaborate with the researchers and industry partners under the supervision of Dr. Sara Diamond and postdocs Drs. Arunachalan and Szigeti. The RA is expected to attend meetings not only at OCAD University, but potentially at industrial partner sites. Participation in design and engineering context literature review as well as participation in the communication of research results in the form of academic publications, reports, exhibitions, posters and presentations is expected as part of the research process. As well as technical skills described earlier the intern should bring: • Knowledge of data visualization • Knowledge in mobile application development (asset) • Some exposure to design thinking and broad range of design methods • Comfort working in a highly interdisciplinary and cross-cultural team, but also to work independently, and meet deadlines The student will have skills in computer science with a focus on graphics computation, and will be capable of programming in a number of computer languages. Ideally the student will have worked on data analytics projects and will ideally bring capacity in data visualization. Experience with at least some of Tableau, C++, C#, Objective C, Processing, JAVA, IBM SPSS, SAS VA, Many Eyes, is required as well as Processing. Exposure to the principles of Human Computer Interaction will be valuable as well as experience in interface design and evaluation. Exposure to Android alos helpful. Relevant course topics: Visual Analytics, Data Analytics, Human Computer Interaction, User Interface Design, Network Computing, Mobile Computing, Ubiquitous Computing, Media Studies, Health Informatics. 25 May, 2015 14 August, 2015 OCAD University – Toronto Ontario Sara Diamond 0 1 The Globe and Mail; BBM Analytics; IBM; Kaypok; Waterfront Toronto English Culturing microalgae at extreme pH and salinity In this project, we will explore the factors affecting the productivity of microalgae when cultured at extreme conditions of pH (10) and salinity ( 1 M). Extremophilic microalgae and cyanobacteria has been identified by our collaborators, and we are working at optimizing the culture conditions in order to maximize carbon dioxide uptake rate and oil accumulation rate. Growing at high pH means that the concentration of carbonate ions in solution (needed to support photosynthetic activity) is several orders of magnitude higher than when operating at neutral or acidic pH. The research will be in the area of process optimization for biofuels and green chemicals production using microalgae. Microalgae are of great interest as a source of biofuels (green diesel, biodiesel, hydrogen, and ethanol), nutraceuticals, and other chemicals. Microalgae are photosynthetic unicellular organisms that use light and carbon dioxide to power their metabolism. Certain microalgae species are also capable of growing in the dark feeding on organic carbon substrates. Whether they are growing with light (photoautotrophically) or in the dark (heterotrophically), microalgae are highly efficient organisms capable of accumulating large amounts of lipids or starch, as well as other high-value chemicals. The accumulated lipids (or starch) can later be converted into diesel (or ethanol). Other algal strains can be manipulated to direct their metabolism for the production of hydrogen or the direct production of ethanol (without intermediate starch accumulation). Despite the great potential of microalgae, current commercial applications are limited to very-high value, low-volume products. This is mainly due to the very low cell densities that characterize microalgal culture systems (normally less than 1 g/L on a dry weight basis) and the high processing costs associated with handling large volumes of liquids and harvesting from diluted streams. In our group we are focused on optimizing and intensifying microalgal cultivation processes through the systematic regulation of the environment surrounding the cells, with the goal of raising cell density and productivity to commercially feasible levels. It is expected that the student will be involved in: - culturing selected microalgae species under different conditions as indicated in project description above, - collecting and analyzing daily samples, - processing data, - report writing and presentation of results to group members. Specific student involvement will be tailored to student’s needs and background, with the idea of maximizing student learning during the 12 weeks of the project. - Background in Chemical, Biochemical, or Biomedical Engineering. Students with background on microbiology or biological sciences can also apply if they are interested on learning about industrial applications of biology. - Basic training on laboratory t 1 May, 2015 30 July, 2015 University of Calgary – Calgary Alberta Hector De la Hoz Siegler 0 1 Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. English Optimization of oil productivity in cyclic cultures of microalgae The goal of this research project is to identify and model the effect that light has on the growth and productivity of microalgae when an organic carbon substrate is present. Certain algal strains are capable of growing in the absence of light by feeding on an organic carbon substrate that serves both as an energy source and as a carbon source. This type of growth is called heterotrophic growth, as opposed to photoautotrophic growth in which the algal cells use light as an energy source and CO2 as a carbon source. Because the metabolic pathways followed for each one of these two growth modes are different, algal cells require different sets of enzymes to survive and thrive: one set for the photo-mode and another enzyme set for the hetero-mode. As enzyme building is an expensive metabolic process, cells try to optimize the amount (expression level) and type of enzyme of each type being produced. The photo-mode enzymes are not required by cells growing in the dark; consequently, cells that have been growing for long periods in the dark tend to lack photo-mode enzymes. On the other hand, cells that have been continuously growing without an external organic carbon source will lack hetero-mode enzymes. Cells growing in a cyclic mode, switching from light to dark, and in the presence of an organic carbon source will be in need of the two sets of enzymes if they are going to take advantage of all the resources available for them: light and the organic compounds as source of energy, and CO2 and the organic compounds as a source of carbon. The need of two different enzyme sets, however, implies that cells that want to take advantage of all the available resources have to pay a metabolic price in terms of energy and carbon requirements. In some cases, the metabolic price may be more than the benefits obtained by having access to all the resources and the cells will be more efficient if they were only using some of the available resources. In this project, algal cells will be cultured in the presence of an organic carbon substrate in a cyclic way alternating periods of light with periods of darkness. Control experiments will include: i) cyclic cultures without an organic carbon source (photoautotrophic), ii) photoautotrophic cultures with continuous illumination, and iii) heterotrophic cultures without light. Biomass growth, lipid accumulation, and carbon utilization will be measured at regular time intervals, and the data will be used to develop a dynamic model to correlate the manipulated variables (light intensity and carbon substrate concentration) to the system performance (biomass and lipid productivity). The research will be in the area of process optimization for biofuels and green chemicals production using microalgae. Microalgae are of great interest as a source of biofuels (green diesel, biodiesel, hydrogen, and ethanol), nutraceuticals, and other chemicals. Microalgae are photosynthetic unicellular organisms that use light and carbon dioxide to power their metabolism. Certain microalgae species are also capable of growing in the dark feeding on organic carbon substrates. Whether they are growing with light (photoautotrophically) or in the dark (heterotrophically), microalgae are highly efficient organisms capable of accumulating large amounts of lipids or starch, as well as other high-value chemicals. The accumulated lipids (or starch) can later be converted into diesel (or ethanol). Other algal strains can be manipulated to direct their metabolism for the production of hydrogen or the direct production of ethanol (without intermediate starch accumulation). Despite the great potential of microalgae, current commercial applications are limited to very-high value, low-volume products. This is mainly due to the very low cell densities that characterize microalgal culture systems (normally less than 1 g/L on a dry weight basis) and the high processing costs associated with handling large volumes of liquids and harvesting from diluted streams. In our group we are focused on optimizing and intensifying microalgal cultivation processes through the systematic regulation of the environment surrounding the cells, with the goal of raising cell density and productivity to commercially feasible levels. It is expected that the student will be involved in: - culturing selected microalgae species under different conditions as indicated in project description above, - collecting and analyzing daily samples, - processing data, - report writing and presentation of results to group members. Specific student involvement will be tailored to student’s needs and background, with the idea of maximizing student learning during the 12 weeks of the project. 1- Background in Chemical, Biochemical, or Biomedical Engineering. Students with background on microbiology or biological sciences can also apply if they are interested on learning about industrial applications of biology. 2- Basic training on laboratory techniques and safety procedures, including use of analytical balances and handling of aseptic cultures is desirable. Specific training on culturing microalgae will be provided on-site. 3- Interest on learning about or previous experience with biofuels and renewable energy. 4- Strong analytical skills: have a basic understanding of differential equations and material balances. Experience using Matlab or other numerical software is a plus. 1 May, 2015 1 July, 2015 University of Calgary – Calgary Alberta Hector De la Hoz Siegler 0 0 null French Valeur adaptative du comportement de gaspillage chez le prédateur furtif Aphidoletes aphidimyza Titre : Valeur adaptative du comportement de gaspillage chez le prédateur furtif Aphidoletes aphidimyza. Modèle biologique : cédcidomyie, pucerons et prédateurs aphidiphages Expérimentation : Approche expérimentale Superviseurs : Éric Lucas Période : Été 2015 Résumé : La cécidomyie Aphidoletes aphidimyza est un prédateur furtif qui vit au stade larvaire au sein des colonies de pucerons sans déclencher de réactions de défenses significative chez les proies. La cécidomyie est néanmoins attaquée par des prédateurs intraguildes comme les punaises et les coccinelles. L’objectif du travail est d’établir quelle est la valeur adapatative de ce comportement. Les prédateurs furtifs comme les cécidomyie manifestent un comportement de gaspillage, c'est à dire qu’ils tuent plus de proies qu’ils n'en consomment, lorsque celles-ci sont en abondance. La larve du prédateur est alors entourée de pucerons morts qu'elle a partiellement vidés et qu'elle se remettra éventuellement à consommer par la suite. Hypothèse: Le gaspillage en fournissant des proies de substitution au prédateur intraguilde réduit l'intensité de la prédation intraguilde sur les prédateurs furtifs. Méthodologie: Des expériences en laboratoire permettront de contrôler le gaspillage en régulant le nombre de pucerons paralysés mais non vidés. L'impact du gaspillage sur l'intensité de la prédation intraguilde sera évalué par la suite. Aspect théorique : Interactions entre prédateurs entomophages Cet axe de recherche fondamental étudie principalement les interactions au sein des communautés animales terrestres, et plus spécifiquement la prédation intraguilde (quand un organisme dévore un compétiteur) et la prédation furtive. La prédation intraguilde est considérée comme une interaction majeure, tant au niveau de l'individu, des populations que des communautés. Elle peut en outre déterminer le succès de programmes de conservation ou de lutte biologique. Le but du programme de recherche est de caractériser les mécanismes qui favorisent ou limitent la prédation intraguilde au sein des guildes d'insectes prédateurs et d'analyser les stratégies défensives développées en réponse au risque de prédation. À plus long terme, l'objectif est d'exploiter ces connaissances pour mettre sur pied des programmes de lutte biologique plus efficaces. Le second programme porte sur l'étude de la prédation furtive. Un prédateur furtif est un prédateur qui vit au contact de ses proies en les exploitants sans déclencher de réactions de défense significatives. Ce type singulier de prédation peut permettre dans certaines circonstances au prédateur furtif de se protéger contre ses propres prédateurs (intraguildes). Le projet vise à évaluer la compatibilité entre prédateurs furtifs et autres ennemis naturels. Le projet vise également à évaluer dans quelle mesure le prédateur furtif peut exploiter les défenses passives (effet de dilution, effet de rencontre, …) et actives (phéromones d'alarme) de sa proie ou encore des fourmis entretenant ses proies. - Rédaction d'un protocole de recherche - Gestion des élevages entomologiques - Prise de données, expérimentation, observation - Analyse des résultats avec aide des superviseurs - Rédaction dun rapport de stage Connaissances élémentaires en Ecologie, capacité de travailler avec des insectes, connaissances entomologiques de base, motivation, 1 mai, 2015 1 septembre, 2015 Université du Québec à Montréal – Montréal Québec Eric Lucas 0 0 null English Employing Homotopy Methods for Circuit Simulations The rapid growth of the radio frequency (RF) integrated circuit (IC) market has led to increasing demands for accurate evaluation of system performance before circuit fabrication. System characteristics, such as distortion power, frequency, and noise, can be accurately determined only if the circuit operates in its periodic steady-state domain. Hence, finding a circuit’s dc operating points and its periodic steady-state are very important to the IC design community. The SPICE simulator can be used to find the steady-state response of circuits only by performing transient analysis over a long period of time and the designer needs to ensure that the circuit settles into its periodic steady-state. This approach is often inefficient and, in some cases, not suitable for simulating RF circuits. Therefore, the periodic steady-state circuit response is simulated directly using either the time-domain Newton-Raphson shooting method or the frequency-domain harmonic-balance method. The time-domain Newton-Raphson shooting method is preferred for simulating highly nonlinear circuits. However, an appropriate set of initial conditions is required for its convergence. This is a challenging problem when simulating oscillators, where the period of oscillations is not known a priory. Homotopy methods are robust and accurate numerical techniques for solving nonlinear algebraic equations. These methods have been used to find dc operating points of nonlinear circuits (HomSPICE) and for their steady-state analysis (HomSSPICE). The initial implementations proved promising for finding periodic steady-state solutions of non-autonomous and autonomous circuits that could not be otherwise simulated. HomSPICE and HomSSPICE are derived from SPICE and HOMPACK (a numerical package that implements homotopy algorithms). HomSSPICE is a tool for exploring the use of globally convergent homotopy algorithms for the periodic steady-state analysis of both autonomous and non-autonomous circuits. The simulator is shown to have robust convergence for a variety of sinusoidal oscillators. The proposed project deals with using homotopy and continuation methods to solve differential algebraic equations emanating from analysis of electric circuits. HomSSPICE and HomSPICE software packages employing these methods have not been made publicly available. We are interested in completing the new generation of these tools and releasing them to the research community. References: 1. W. Ma, Lj. Trajkovic, and K. Mayaram, “HomSSPICE: a homotopy-based circuit simulator for periodic steady-state analysis of oscillators,” Proc. IEEE Int. Symp. Circuits and Systems, Scottsdale, AZ, May 2002, pp. I-645-I-648. 2. Lj. Trajkovic, S. Sanders, and E. Fung, “HomSPICE: simulator with homotopy algorithms for finding dc and steady-state solutions of nonlinear circuits,” Proc. IEEE Int. Symp. Circuits and Systems, Monterey, CA, June 1998, TPA 10-2. I lead the Communication Networks Laboratory in the School of Engineering Science at Simon Fraser University: http://www.ensc.sfu.ca/~ljilja/cnl/index.html. My research interests span two areas: nonlinear circuits and systems and communication networks. In the area of nonlinear circuits and systems, my research deals with: analysis of complex systems and networks; theory of nonlinear circuits and systems; software tools for circuit simulation, and homotopy methods for finding dc, steady-state, and transient solutions of transistor circuits. I made fundamental contributions to the advancements of theory of dc operating points of bipolar transistor circuits. I have also developed and implemented homotopy algorithms for finding dc operating points, steady state, and transient responses of electronic circuits. In 2005, I was elected IEEE Fellow with the citation ``for contributions to computer aided design tools for circuit analysis.'' In the area of communication networks, I worked on modeling and analysis of computer networks; characterization and modeling of network traffic; performance analysis of communication networks; simulation of protocols and network control algorithms; and intelligent control of communication systems. My research activities encompass wireline and wireless data networks, with emphasis on traffic modeling and characterization, simulation of network protocols and algorithms, and analysis of network performance. Current projects deal with collection, characterization, and modeling of traffic from deployed networks such as BCNET in British Columbia, Canada. Student will collaborate on the NGSPICE open source project available at http://ngspice.sourceforge.net/. The project involves enhancing the original UC Berkeley SPICE3 tools. NGSPICE is a mixed-level/mixed-signal circuit simulator based on three open source software tools: SPICE3 (the circuit simulator developed by UC Berkeley), CIDER (a mixed-level simulator based on SPICE3f5 and the DSIM device simulator), and XSPICE (an extension to SPICE3 to include event-driven algorithms). NGSPICE tools are used to validate circuit designs by Universities and several IC CAD (integrated circuits computer-aided) companies. At the end of 12 week term student will: • Have good understanding of SPICE3 simulation tool. • Be able to implement theoretical concepts, methods, and algorithms used in analysis of circuit designs. • Enhance his/her computing skills and knowledge of programming languages. • Acquire analytical skills crucial in solving engineering problems. • Demonstrate knowledge of tools for integrated circuit design. • The student should have research interests in circuit design and in developing computer-aided software tools for circuit analysis. • Background in the analysis and design of electric circuits, exposure to circuit design and circuit simulation tools such as SPICE. • Strong programming skills with ability to learn new programming languages and tools with minimum supervision. • Experience with C, C++, Matlab, CGI scripting, Java Script and HTML is preferred. • Fluency in written/spoken English is must. 15 May, 2015 15 August, 2015 Simon Fraser University – Burnaby British Columbia Ljiljana Trajkovic 0 0 N/A English Role of Nlrs in neurodegenerative diseases Nlrx1, belongs to NLR family of intracellular sensors that regulate mayor cellular pathway including cell death and inflammation. Previous research implicated Nlrx1 in regulation of autophagy and reactive oxygen species production during viral infection. In addition most recent publication implicated Nlrx1 in regulation of the cell death in fibroblasts cultures. Our preliminary data show that Nlrx1-/- mice are more prone to develop experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. The increased susceptibility of the Nlrx1-/- mice is associated with increased (2 fold) inflammatory infiltrate and induced astrogliosis (2 fold) compared to WT control. We also noted a drastic reduction (7 fold) in neuronal content in the spinal cords of Nlrx1-/- compared to WT mice. Such profound differences in the neuronal content cannot be explained by magnitude of the inflammatory response. Therefore, the cell death phenomenon that we observed has to be neuron specific. Aim 1 is to characterize inflammation-induced cell death in primary cultures from WT and Nlrx1-/-mice. Hypothesis: Nlrx1 inhibits inflammation-induced neuronal death. We will study inflammation-induced cell death in the mixed brain cultures that contain neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. In addition we will use oxygen/glucose deprivation model of stroke to screen several drag candidates. We will assess cell death by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and Western blotting. The results of these studies will lay foundation for development of new therapeutical agents to treat neurodegenerative diseases For a long time, central nervous system was considered an immunoprivileged site for its limited arsenal to mount an inflammatory response. In the recent years, work of many researchers throughout the world demonstrated that the immune system plays a critical role in maintaining CNS homeostasis during healthy state and disease. Neuroinflammation emerged as a common denominator in many neurodegenerative diseases including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntigton’s disease, epilepsy, stroke, etc. Therefore, I believe that lessons learnt from one neurodegenerative disease can be applied to study mechanisms of several other neurodegenerative diseases. My goal is to find key players that regulate neuroinflammatory response and to use this knowledge to design novel therapies to treat neurodegenerative diseases. A recently discovered family of proteins, Nlrs, are among main regulatory proteins of the immune system. The Nlr family of proteins comprises 23 members in humans and 34 in mice. Nlrs can regulate both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Upon pathogen recognition, these proteins activate multiple pro-inflammatory molecular pathways, including formation of inflammasome, activation of NFκB and MAP kinase pathways. Nlrs have been implicated in the development of autoimmune disorders; however, their function in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration is poorly understood. The long term objective of this program is study the role of Nlrs in neuroinflammation. For more details please visit our website www.neuroimmunology.ca Be able to independently carry out project and present results during lab meetings. Help rest of the lab members. General duties include cell culture, DNA, RNA, and protein extraction and analysis. We are looking for students with general science background and knowledge of molecular biology. Most importantly, we are looking for highly motivated individuals with excellent academic standings and good team players 1 May, 2015 1 August, 2015 Université de Sherbrooke – Sherbrooke Québec Denis Gris 0 0 null English Developing competencies to appropriate innovations in the health care sector: the case of ICT for readapting people with intelle Intellectual disability (ID) is a condition that is characterized "by significant limitations both in intellectual functioning and in adaptive behavior." Between 1% and 3% of the population meets the criteria for intellectual disability (Harris, 2006). New practices to improve quality of life emerged in the field of ID, particularly in the last two decades, such as the use of information technologies ((mobile apps, ipads, touch screen, intelligent apartments, etc.). These innovations intend to reduce the disability in order to increase social participation. Results of recent studies show that information technology and communications (ICT) contain an undeniable potential to intervene with persons with intellectual disabilities and support them. Although several studies have shown the positive impact of the use of such technologies, specifically those addressing the usage patterns of people with ID are not as encouraging demonstrating a clear under-utilization compared to the general population. Stakeholders are unfamiliar with available technological solutions and have little time to explore the available material and make it adapted to the needs of people with ID application. Budget cuts in health and social services also restrict training activities that can be provided to stakeholders. In addition, users currently have no technical support in supporting the use of technology. Therefore, the use of technology is made by some stakeholders on an individual basis and approaches advocated approach a trial and error procedure. This approach is unfortunately not viable for large-scale deployment of technologies in a rehabilitation center. Using technology from the perspective of self-determination has certain implications for managers who must also take account of this principle in the way they manage organizational change. This research project intends to explore the links that can be established between the existing models of organizational change management, technology management and the concept of self-determination. The goal is to explore the use of technological innovation trajectory: a priori acceptability (prediction of the potential use of a technology based on subjective representations), acceptance (understanding the factors that will play in the first interactions between an individual and technology) and appropriation (assessment of effective usage in a regular activity) (Reerink-Baker, 2012). The study intends to explore the knowledge, skills and capacities to being developed or being acquired by the care staff, patients and their families to ensure the safe and efficient utilisation of ICT. Bunduchi and co-authors (2011) view the adoption of innovation as “a stage process involving the generation of an innovative idea, the acceptance of that innovation represented by an organizational mandate to change and its implementation so that the innovation becomes ingrained within the organization.” This definition suggests that the concepts of acceptance and appropriation are intrinsic to the process of adoption of innovation (Bunduchi et al., 2011). However, these concepts are ill-defined. Hendrick et al. (1984) defined technology acceptance as “an individual’s psychological state with regard to his or her voluntary or intended use of a particular technology.” Wertsch (1998) proposes that appropriation refers “to taking something that belongs to others and making it one’s own” (cited by Overdijk and Van Diggelen, 2006). This implies a process of social construction that goes beyond the proficient use of a technology or the mastering of a tool as it allows the technology itself, its meaning and effects to be shaped by users. Appropriation takes place at the individual level and recognizes the user as an active change agent. It provides some explanations on how individuals integrate ICTs in their work practice or in their daily lives. Appropriation can also occur at the user group level and at the organizational level. In the case of mobile phone or Internet applications, “mass” appropriation becomes societal and universal implicating individuals from different socio-economic background in almost any country and shaping the ever-evolving features of these applications. To accomplish the latter research objective, students will analyze and evaluate the development and use of ICTs (mobile apps, Ipads, touch screen, intelligent objects, etc.) in rehabilitation center for people with intellectual disabilities. During his internship, the student would be responsible for: - Assessing actual use of ICT by care staff, patient and his family - Supporting the development of ITC for intellectual disability people - Analyzing actual practise and strategies to develop, implement and use ITC - Defining practices to acquiring knowledge, tools and competencies Students could have the following skills and knowledge - Information technology development life cycle - Information technology development skills - Process analysis - Statistical data analysis - Experience in healthcare sector Students should have a background in information technology engineering or biomedical engineering. 1 May, 2015 1 September, 2015 Université du Québec à Trois–Rivières – Trois–Rivières Québec Alejandro Romero 0 1 Centre de réadaptation en déficience intellectuelle et en troubles envahissants du développement de English Exploration of InP Quantum Dot Coherent Frequency Comb Lasers and Mode-Locked Lasers The recent research on QD lasers has focused on C- and L band (1.5-1.6 micron) using InP and 1.3 micron using GaAs. So far, only two-section (gain+saturable absorber) InP/InAs QD mode-locked lasers (MLLs) had been extensively explored. Relatively high threshold current density and waveguide internal loss limit the performance of two-section QD MLLs to relatively wide pulse width at low repetition frequency. In comparison, one-section MLLs generate much narrower and faster pulses, lower power consumption, lower threshold, and higher output power, etc. Unfortunately, the current one-section MLLs are worse in mode-locking depth. One-section QD MLLs have not been well investigated in both theory and physical designs. For one-section QD MLLs, physical design of QD waveguide is the key for optimum performance. The ridge width and waveguide length are also essential parameters to determine the optical spectrum. A shorter waveguide length could improve the output power and spectral width. Alternatively, stacking more QD layers would lead to substantial improvement of optical confinement and possible spectral width, and also markedly reduced threshold. Capping QDs with a thin GaAs layer was found to shift the emission spectrum of QDs to C- and L- bands. Different barrier thickness incorporated to the chirped QDs also led to broader gain spectrum. It can be seen that current studies of physical structure design to improve the performance of QD lasers had not been studied comprehensively. Broadband dynamic characteristic is another desired feature of QD lasers but difficult to achieve. The best 8-GHz bandwidth of QD laser was demonstrated by shortening waveguide length. However, the bandwidth required is usually more than 20 GHz. Again, intensive investigations of waveguide designs are necessary to broaden the modulation bandwidth for future applications. Theoretical modeling is vital for designing QD lasers. There is no such application software to model QD lasers with a comprehensive approach. Objectives: 1) Create physical models for modeling of InP QD lasers. With inputs of basic physical structures and materials, the model can predict the laser performance, such as gain spectrum, and noise etc, and mode-locking performance, and so on. 2) Design certain QD lasers with prerequisites using the modeling. The prerequisites like modulation bandwidth, RIN, and gain spectrum width, for example. 3) Fabricate the designed QD lasers by NRC with the help of CMC. We shall characterize and compare to/with the modeling. 4) Improve the physical models using the characterization results, and optimize the designs of QD lasers. 5) Propose novel and new designs of QD lasers using the launched modeling to improve gain bandwidth, modulation bandwidth, RIN, linewidth and mode-locking, etc. Hence, QD lasers have gain bandwidth of more than 20 nm, modulation bandwidth of more than 20 GHz, and RIN of less than -140 dB/Hz, and other conditions. This will address certain QD laser design challenges. 6) Perform comprehensive study of mode-locking physical mechanisms of QD MLLs and finally investigate the design techniques for highly mode-locked lasers (high mode-locking depth) so that timing jitter of the pulse train is reduced. For InP quantum dot lasers, mode-locking can be achieved using one-section quantum dot lasers. Dr. Zhang has pioneered the research of one-section quantum dot mode-locked lasers and coherent frequency comb lasers in the world. He and his team demonstrated a one-section quantum dot mode-locked laser emitting 25, 50 and 100 GHz, 403, 457 GHz repetition rate pulses with hundreds of femtosecond pulse duration and tunable THz pulses of 1-2.2 THz. It was found by his team that the mode-locking mechanism in one-section mode-locked lasers is different from that in two-section mode-locked lasers, where four-wave mixing between multiple wavelength lights emitting from the one-section quantum dot lasers and saturation effect are the key for the mode-locking, which was demonstrated and verified experimentally. Recently , he established and reported the physical model to analyze mode-locking mechanisms. For this topic of research, he has mainly focused on InP QD multi-wavelength lasers, InP QD femtosecond mode locked lasers, and InP QD DFB single-mode lasers. In addition, he is considering study of InP QD lasers (1.5 micron) based on Silicon substrate. The results from this work will lead to new developments in QD lasers and open-up many new applications. This laser can be used for advanced coherent optical communications, high sensitivity optical sensing, medical imaging and frequency comb generation. For the research of this topic, Dr. Zhang has been supported by NSERC strategic project, CIPI projects, O/E Land Inc., and NSERC discovery projects as well as NRC in Ottawa. The students' duties are 1. Establish the physical model of one-section QD mode locked lasers 2. Design physical structures of QD lasers to achieve the above objectives 3. Test the fabricated QD laser chips The students are required to know 1. basics of physics 2. Semiconductor physics 3. Matlab 4. good mathematics The students who have degree in physics, or have more knowledge in photonics and nanotechnology are welcome. 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 Concordia University – Montréal Québec (John) Xiupu ZHANG 0 0 null English GRAND NCE Digital Media Globalink Intern Partnership The interns will be involved in designing, evaluating, and implementing interactive digital media systems related to education, entertainment, health, collaboration and sustainability applications. Typically they will be critiquing and testing user interface designs for systems that are under development. The Integrated and Interactive Design and Engagement Media for Sustainability (IIDEMS) project. Planning and design for sustainability in the built environment are technically complex, information- and visualization-rich tasks. To be successful, they must engage diverse public, professional, regulatory and political stakeholders in meaningful, collaborative decision-making about the future. IIDEMS investigates digital media approaches and tools that inspire, engage and inform stakeholders to imagine, plan, design, construct, operate and inhabit a more sustainable built environment. This will be a 'cluster' of interns (at least 8, at most 10) working on projects within the GRAND NCE in the Greater Vancouver Area at the three universities affiliated with GRAND (Emily Carr, Simon Fraser, and UBC). All of the research will be related to digital media, but it will specifically connect to research underway by multiple researchers in GRAND at the three universities. As part of the internships all students will have an opportunity to see research underway at all three schools and to interact with each other during field trips and other events that will be available to them (in addition to events provided by Mitacs through Globalink). Ronald Kellett is a Professor of Landscape Architectur at UBC. He holds degrees in environmental studies and architecture. He has practiced architecture in British Columbia and taught architecture at the University of Oregon until 2004, when he joined the Landscape Architecture program at the University of British Columbia. His work focuses on issues of environmental quality and urban form and the development of form-based tools for urban design. He is co-author, with Cynthia Girling, of the book Skinny Streets Green Neighborhoods: Design for Environment and Community (Island Press, 2005) on the making of contemporary 'green neighbourhoods' and elementsdb, a web application of case-based data for urban design. Their work, through the elementslab, in the Centre for Interactive Research for Sustainability at UBC, creates sustainability-oriented urban design tools, plans, codes, standards, guidelines and prototypes. Students will work within a research team to assess user interfaces for interactive systems to support applications in learning, entertainment, health, collaboration or sustainability applications and will participate in design critiques and prototype implementations. Experience in one or more of the following: (a) programming in C++, Java, or similar languages, (b) designing and evaluating user interfaces, (c) conducting experiments with human subjects to assess performance using interactive systems 1 May, 2015 1 July, 2015 University of British Columbia – Vancouver British Columbia Sheryl Staub-French 0 0 Some of the research projects involve industry partners. English GRAND NCE Digital Media Globalink Intern Partnership The interns will be involved in designing, evaluating, and implementing interactive digital media systems related to education, entertainment, health, collaboration and sustainability applications. Typically they will be critiquing and testing user interface designs for systems that are under development. The Integrated and Interactive Design and Engagement Media for Sustainability (IIDEMS) project. Planning and design for sustainability in the built environment are technically complex, information- and visualization-rich tasks. To be successful, they must engage diverse public, professional, regulatory and political stakeholders in meaningful, collaborative decision-making about the future. IIDEMS investigates digital media approaches and tools that inspire, engage and inform stakeholders to imagine, plan, design, construct, operate and inhabit a more sustainable built environment. This will be a 'cluster' of interns (at least 8, at most 10) working on projects within the GRAND NCE in the Greater Vancouver Area at the three universities affiliated with GRAND (Emily Carr, Simon Fraser, and UBC). All of the research will be related to digital media, but it will specifically connect to research underway by multiple researchers in GRAND at the three universities. As part of the internships all students will have an opportunity to see research underway at all three schools and to interact with each other during field trips and other events that will be available to them (in addition to events provided by Mitacs through Globalink). Ronald Kellett is a Professor of Landscape Architectur at UBC. He holds degrees in environmental studies and architecture. He has practiced architecture in British Columbia and taught architecture at the University of Oregon until 2004, when he joined the Landscape Architecture program at the University of British Columbia. His work focuses on issues of environmental quality and urban form and the development of form-based tools for urban design. He is co-author, with Cynthia Girling, of the book Skinny Streets Green Neighborhoods: Design for Environment and Community (Island Press, 2005) on the making of contemporary 'green neighbourhoods' and elementsdb, a web application of case-based data for urban design. Their work, through the elementslab, in the Centre for Interactive Research for Sustainability at UBC, creates sustainability-oriented urban design tools, plans, codes, standards, guidelines and prototypes. Students will work within a research team to assess user interfaces for interactive systems to support applications in learning, entertainment, health, collaboration or sustainability applications and will participate in design critiques and prototype implementations. Experience in one or more of the following: (a) programming in C++, Java, or similar languages, (b) designing and evaluating user interfaces, (c) conducting experiments with human subjects to assess performance using interactive systems 1 May, 2015 1 July, 2015 University of British Columbia – Vancouver British Columbia Ron Kellett 0 0 Some of the research projects involve industry partners. English Metabolic performance and reproductive success in forest birds For this project, we aim at linking individual winter performance of chickadees to fitness. This can be done (1) by estimating winter survival and (2) by tracking individual reproductive success in the field. This MITACS projects is included in this second objective. To measure individual reproductive effort and success of birds that were measured in winter, we use a network of over 1100 nest boxes during the summer. Only about 4% of these boxes are used, which allows us to follow reproduction in about 40 breeding pairs. Students involved in this project are measuring eggs, and weighing chicks every day to obtain basic data (clutch size, egg size, date of laying, growth rate of chicks). Then adults must be captured as well for banding and part of these individuals are then taken to the field laboratory for metabolic performance measurements. The MITACS student would be involved in all parts of the field work during the 2015 reproductive season. Depending on the interests, the student could also be invited to join the lab later as a graduate student to keep working on this project or to develop another field or experimental project. Our research focuses on periods of high energy demands for birds such as migration, reproduction and wintering. My students and I are studying how birds manage their energy resources and adjust their physiology to deal with these constraints. We are particularly interested in individual changes in metabolic performance, body composition and physiological condition over the annual cycle. One goal of our research is to understand how birds adjust their physiology in the context of global warming. We are particularly interested in constraints that result from temperature variations and stochastic weather events that are expected to increase with climate change. To do so, we are studying several species of birds (Zonotrichia albicollis, plectrophenax nivalis, taeniopygia guttata,Poecile Atricapillus) in experimental and semi-natural conditions where we can manipulate variables such as temperature and food quality and availability and determine the effects on individual performance. We are particularly interested by the rate of adjustment that birds show to rapid change in environmental conditions. In the field, we are following a population of black-caped chickadee (Poecile Atricapillus) every winter since 2009. Birds are captured and brought to a field laboratory where we measure several parameters that define the energetic costs of physiological maintenance and cold endurance. We are also tracking individual condition and hormonal status of individuals. These data are then interpreted in terms of winter climatic variations and seasonal acclimatization. The student will be a member of the field team. He\she will be involved in daily box checks, egg and bird captures and measures and will assists researchers in the field. The student must follow a training in biology and be interested in ecophysiology. Experience with birds is an asset but not a requirement. Although we speak English the most commonly used language in the field is French so the student must expect some language barrier in the beginning of the project. Birds feed on insects. So the work involve contact with moskitoes and other bug annoyance. The student must be ready to spend a lot of time in the field (the team sleeps at the station) and be able to work in group. 1 May, 2015 31 September, 2015 Université du Québec à Rimouski Québec François Vézina 1 1 Corporation de la forêt d'enseignement et de recherche Macpès English Studying the ubiquitin system as a regulator of glutamate receptor synaptic expression The synaptic density of AMPARs is crucial for synaptic plasticity and increasing evidence shows that the ubiquitin (UB) system regulates glutamatergic neurotransmission. However, our understanding of the consequences of an aberrant UB system on AMPARs remains exceptionally limited. In this context, there is a critical need to identify the specific mechanisms by which the UB system regulates AMPAR synaptic expression. Our current focus is mostly on elucidating the function of E3 ubiquitin ligases, the components of the ubiquitin system that make ubiquitination a specific, dynamic and highly regulated process. Specifically, my work has shown that RNF167, an endosomal E3 ubiquitin ligase, regulates AMPAR surface expression and neurotransmission (Lussier et al., PNAS, 2012). However, the mechanism remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of the project will be to determine the fundamental molecular and cellular aspects by which UB and RNF167 regulates AMPAR surface and synaptic expression. Specifically, the project will characterize recently identified RNF167 substrates may critically function as a regulator of AMPAR trafficking. The project will use various state-of-the-art approaches (molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry and pharmacology) to uncover pathways and mechanisms involving post-translational modifications. Increasing evidence proposes that memory impairments associated with aging and in the early onset of Alzheimer's disease are caused by an alteration of hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission and in glutamatergic synaptic function, which eventually leads to the characteristic memory deficits. Therefore, there is intense interest in defining the molecular mechanisms underlying glutamate receptors intracellular trafficking, which are biologically relevant and determine synaptic function in normal and pathological conditions. Alteration in endocytic trafficking and function may have terrible repercussions on mental health, and such perturbations have been described in a number of neurological diseases including AD, Down’s syndrome, and Huntington’s disease. To better understand the mechanisms controlling glutamate receptors trafficking and synaptic expression, we must also consider the function of post-translational modifications. We are interested in ubiquitination, a process that regulates protein quality control, membrane protein trafficking, and receptor internalization and down-regulation. Also, ubiquitination has now emerged as an important regulator of synaptic activity and plasticity. We expect that our research will provide a deeper understanding of key molecular mechanisms used by the UB system for fine-tuning glutamate receptor surface expression. Such knowledge is essential for a better understanding of the normal and fundamental mechanisms that may be affected in neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, leading to synaptic deficit. The student will perform with other members of the laboratory, the tasks required to generate a progression of the project. This includes but not limited to: reading scientific literature to get a good grasp of the project and its direction, making solutions and buffers required by the various protocoles, working at the bench (e.g. mutagenesis, immunoprecipitation, Western blot), analyzing data, assembling figures (using Powerpoint, Illustrator, Photoshop). The student may be asked to present and discuss his work in an informal lab/group meeting at the end of the internship. The student(s) should possess a good knowledge of biochemistry and cell biology. The student should have: high level of personal motivation, intellectual curiosity, critical and creative thinking, ability to work independently, be well-organized, attention to details. 18 May, 2015 14 August, 2015 Université du Québec à Montréal – Montréal Québec Marc Lussier 0 0 null English Pacific salmon as monitors of ecosystem resilience: measuring effects of ocean warming on early marine juvenile Chinook salmon Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) are integral to the BC economy, culture, and ecology. Chinook salmon are valued as a cultural keystone species for numerous First Nations’ groups along the Pacific Northwest coast. The annual returns of spawning Chinook adult salmon serve as important prey for many fishes, birds, and mammals, particularly killer whales. Prolonged declines have been observed range-wide and many stocks in southern British Columbia are at critically low levels despite drastic reductions in fishing effort and the implementation of several conservation and mitigation initiatives. While the causes of Chinook salmon declines are likely multifactorial, it is generally recognized that persistently unfavourable ocean conditions and poor marine survival played a major role in these declines. Large scale shifts in climate indices, likely indicators of temperature change, have been implicated in the variable early marine survival exhibited by Chinook salmon populations while human impacted long-term ocean warming has been suggested as a causative factor in the ocean carrying capacity for juvenile Chinook salmon over large areas. In addition, declines in survival may also be driven by a mismatch in the timing of the spring bloom and ocean entry of juvenile salmon. Growth during the early stages of marine life determines mortality rates; failure to attain a critical size before winter results in endocrine dysfunction, stunted growth, and eventually death. To understand the effects of ocean conditions on Chinook salmon survival we will examine the factors affecting salmon growth and survival during their early marine life using a combination of field and laboratory approaches. The University of Victoria maintains a state-of-the-art aquatic research facility (ARF) on campus. The ARF houses a variety of recirculating aquaria suitable for rearing and experimental uses. We will use this unique facility to perform experimental manipulations of the physical and biological environment encountered by juvenile Chinook salmon during early marine life. Our objectives are to employ an experimental approach in an attempt to better understand how juvenile Chinook salmon respond to climate and food variability during early marine life. By controlling water temperature and holding food availability constant, we will simulate ocean temperatures associated with large-scale climate indices as well as local thermal regimes resulting from the historical pattern of sea surface temperatures. By controlling food quantity and timing, we will simulate match/mismatch dynamics in prey abundance. We will monitor fish daily, and assess growth patterns, energy levels and survival. Through observation we will also examine behavioral responses, particularly swimming and feeding behavior, and response to threats. We will also have access to field collected specimens. We will examine stomach contents for diet analysis, otoliths for age and growth, and will measure lipids to quantify storage reserves. Our results will provide missing information needed to evaluate when and where early marine mortality is acting, the extent of size selectivity, and the potential mechanisms responsible for the observed mortality. I am a fisheries ecologist. I conduct work that tests ecological theory and makes new insights, but which also fills gaps and needs of management agencies. My focus is on quantifying how individuals, populations and communities respond to environmental and anthropogenic change. The major themes of the research in the Juanes Fisheries Ecology and Conservation Lab are: 1) Coastal fish ecology. This theme includes sampling of coastal habitats to establish habitat-species relationships and tagging to assess movement rates, studies of growth and energy accumulation particularly of estuarine and early ocean-life Pacific salmonids with a focus on early marine mortality, and laboratory work to assess winter energy dynamics and interspecific interactions among co-occurring salmonids, and to quantify predator-prey relationships; 2) Soundscape ecology of coastal ecosystems. This theme focuses on soniferous fishes in both coastal and deep-sea environments. Coastal surveys will examine the seasonal presence and absence of fish sounds. Passive acoustics will be used as a tool to examine distribution and habitat use of soniferous fishes, particularly spawning habitat. We will also for the first time conduct passive acoustics research on deep-sea fishes; and 3) Conservation genetics of coastal ecosystems. Genetic tools will be used to quantify population structure, movements, sources, and hybridization rates of coastal fishes and invertebrates. Novel tools such as metagenomics will give insight into the impacts of harvesting and invasive species on genetic diversity. During the experimental period, the student will be responsible for measuring and recording weekly fish size, and daily fish feeding, fish health checks and recording behavioral observations. After the experimental period and using field-collected specimens, the student will participate in laboratory analyses including daily growth estimation, lipid content and blood physiology. The student will also be responsible for data management and participate in post hoc data analysis and interpretation. Background in biology or ecology. Detail-oriented. Not afraid to get wet or work with live fish 15 May, 2015 15 August, 2015 University of Victoria – Victoria British Columbia Francis Juanes 1 0 null English Instrumentation Design for a Stratospheric Balloon In 2016, we will be launching a set of three high-altitude balloons to study particles from the radiation belts which impact the upper atmosphere over Canada. The project will involve building and testing instruments for those flights. The dynamic radiation belts lose energetic particles through several pathways. One process involves initially-trapped energetic particles being nudged by electromagnetic waves onto trajectories that take them into the upper atmosphere. When they subsequently impact the upper atmosphere, they cause a shower of secondary particles and X-rays, altering the physical structure and chemistry of the upper atmosphere. The incident high-energy particle precipitates into the absorbing atmosphere and hence is lost from the radiation belts. The balloon flights are designed to observe this process. They will carry X-ray detectors to monitor particle collisions with the upper atmosphere, as well as Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio receivers to monitor the waves which can cause the particles to precipitate. Since the X-rays caused by this process do not penetrate deeply into the atmosphere, the observations will be conducted from an unmanned stratospheric balloon at an altitude above 25 km. Designing instruments that will function flawlessly in the harsh environments encountered on such a flight is a difficult task. The X-ray detectors will be based on similar previously-flown instruments from the University of Washington, the integration will be done in consultation with investigators from Dartmouth College and the balloon will be flown in cooperation with an experienced industrial partner (Scientific Instrumentation Ltd. of Saskatoon). The overall goal of my group's research is to better understand the physical processes at work in near-Earth space (roughly, the region where most satellites fly between the upper atmosphere and the moon). The matter in this region is dominated by charged particles, and the motion of these particles is controlled by electric and magnetic fields set up by the Earth and by its interaction with the solar wind. The overall system of particles and electromagnetic fields is known as the magnetosphere, and has a typical dimension of tens of Earth radii. We seek to better understand the physical processes in the magnetosphere: both how the electromagnetic fields are set up and how the particles react. More specifically, we focus on a region of highly energetic particles known as the Van Allen radiation belts. These are regions of near-Earth space populated by high-energy particles trapped by Earth’s magnetic field. The radiation in these regions poses a hazard to satellites which traverse them, mostly through damage incurred by the electronics. The radiation belts are highly dynamic; the energetic particle levels may increase or decrease rapidly, often driven by abrupt reconfigurations of the entire magnetosphere known as geomagnetic storms. The causes for these changes in the particle environment are a subject of current research. With dedicated missions from NASA (the Van Allen probes, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/rbsp/main/) and other international agencies, the radiation belts will be the focus of intense scientific exploration in the coming years. The student will be expected to assist with the design and test of the VLF radio receiver instrument, and potentially with integrating the instrument with the rest of the balloon payload. The VLF receiver will be based on a current design from the University of Calgary for a ground-based instrument known as ABOVE (see www.ucalgary.ca/above for details). The bulk of the project will be based on migrating this design to a design that can survive and function in the extreme environments encountered on a stratospheric balloon. Given sufficient time, we will move into integrating the instrument with the rest of the payload,. Some of the tasks may include analog electronic design, including low-noise preamplifier design, digital electronics design for the instrument controller (currently implemented on a FPGA, or Field Programmable Gate Array), communications and control design, mechanical design and thermal modelling. Most assembly will be conducted in-house, and the successful candidate would be expected to assist with assembly tasks including soldering and electronic rework. Testing and troubleshooting, both general electronic testing and more specific environmental testing, will be a major part of the work. The project will be carried out in a team environment. While it is certainly not required that the student be able to contribute to all of the varied design tasks, it is essential that they be able to integrate well with a small team. The successful candidate will have good communication skills and a demonstrated ability to work in a team environment. She/he will have a solid background in electronics and a strong knowledge of computer programming including C. Practical experience with electronic assembly would be an asset, as would previous experience with FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) design in the VHDL language. Candidates with an interest in magnetospheric physics will be preferred. 1 May, 2015 31 August, 2015 University of Calgary – Calgary Alberta Christopher Cully 0 1 Scientific Instrumentation Ltd. English Theorems for Factorial Schur Functions The most fundamental of the symmetric functions are the Schur functions. Schur functions count a particular type of combinatorial object called a tableau. If we construct all tableaux of a given shape, weight each tableau in a certain way, and sum up all these weights, the result is the Schur function for that shape. However, there are also deep connections with representation theory since the Schur functions are the characters of the finite dimensional irreducible representations of the general linear group. Thus both algebraic and combinatorial techniques can be used to reveal information about these functions. The Schur functions are key because they form a basis for the symmetric functions (i.e. other symmetric functions can be written in terms of Schur functions), and one important question involves how to write a symmetric function in terms of this basis. The answer to this is well-characterized; however, related questions abound. What are ways of calculating these coefficients? When are all the coefficients equal to one in this expansion (multiplicity free)? Since expressing functions in a common basis is illuminating, this can also be used to explore the issue of when two symmetric functions are equal. This can be interpreted in terms of which tableau shapes give rise to the same symmetric function. Because there is symmetry involved, this can sometimes be answered trivially; other times, the answer is more complex. There are only partial answers for most symmetric functions. This project concerns a particular kind of symmetric function called a factorial Schur function. Factorial Schur functions are generated either by tableaux as Schur functions are, but through a different weighting of the tableaux, or by a different kind of tableaux called barred tableaux. There are also connections to Schubert polynomials. Many Schur function theorems have been proved also for factorial Schur functions, and there have also been some results on how to express factorial Schur functions in terms of either Schur functions or factorial Schur functions. But the question of when two factorial Schur functions are equal remains to be explored. The project is to investigate the question of equivalence for factorial Schur functions—when are two factorial Schur functions equal, or when are they “nearly equal”? Algebraic combinatorics is a blend of two mathematical disciplines. The same theorem can often be proved in two different ways--combinatorially and algebraically--thus providing unique insights into the nature of the result. Within the domain of algebraic combinatorics my research area is symmetric functions. These can be considered as generating functions for particular combinatorial objects (thus providing a link to enumerative combinatorics), and they can also be considered as group characters (thus providing a link to representation theory in algebra). A good reference is "Enumerative Combinatorics," Vol II, Ch 7 by Richard P. Stanley of MIT. My specific area within symmetric function theory looks at creating identities for various kinds of symmetric functions. These identities are often proved combinatorially—one side of the identity is shown to count one type of combinatorial object, say sets of boxes called tableaux, while the other side of the identity is shown to count another type of combinatorial object, say paths in the Cartesian plane, and a constructive isomorphism or bijection is given between the two. A host of different identities can be proved in this way and the beauty of the direct bijection—as opposed to algebraic manipulation—is that the underlying structure is completely visible, and the direct relationship between the objects is clear. These kinds of results are of interest to a broad range of communities, and my past work has involved collaborators from bioinformatics, mathematical physics, and computer science. The work will consist of constructing examples, looking for patterns in the examples, generalizing from the patterns to a proof. The role of the student will be to read up on the background of the problem--both in terms of what has already been done for Schur functions and in how factorial Schur functions work--to generate some of the examples, and to collaborate with the professor in formulating a theorem and finding a proof. The student will have regular meetings with the professor to test hypotheses and explore new directions. The student should understand linear algebra (matrices, determinants, vector spaces, inner product) and abstract algebra in general (groups, rings, fields). Some familiarity with combinatorics (graph theory, enumeration) and generating functions is useful but not necessary. The student should be curious, able to work both independently and with others, and enjoy pure mathematics. 1 May, 2015 31 July, 2015 Wilfrid Laurier University – Kitchener Ontario Angele Hamel 0 0 null English Lymphatic function in cancer metastasis The goal of this study is to address the role of tumor draining lymphatic function and cancer immunity during lymphatic metastasis and ionizing radiation (IR) therapy. Metastatic cancer cells invade lymphatic vessels, traffic through collecting lymphatic vessel and enter lymph node (LN) to form metastasis. The presence of cancer cells in the tumor draining LN (TuLN) is a poor prognostic indicator of patient survival/recurrence. The TuLN functions as a site of cancer metastasis, and as a lymphoid organ to generate immune response to the primary cancer. Lymphatic contraction is the major driving force of lymphatic transport, which is driven by smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Using a novel intravital imaging system that allows for the visualization of mouse lymphatic contraction, we observed lymphatic contraction strength is suppressed when tumors reach 6-8 mm in diameter with potential or very small LN metastases. The suppressed lymphatic contraction is correlated with reduced antigen transport to TuLN. We will evaluate how cancers modulate lymphatic contraction and impact lymphatic transport of tumor antigen and tumor associated dendritic cells (TuDCs) to the TuLN. We will further assess how the impaired lymphatic transport causes immune tolerance. IR therapy is widely used to treat cancer patients. Recent studies show that the efficacy of radiation therapy depends on activating host CD8+ T cell responses. We will investigate if IR therapy boosts anti-cancer immunity by improving lymphatic function. Aim 1. To determine if myeloid cell suppress lymphatic contraction by interruption of lymphatic smooth muscle cells. This study will reveal which population of myeloid cells interact with lymphatic vessels during cancer metastasis and how these cells interact with lymphatic smooth muscle cells to suppress its contract activity. Aim 2. To determine if suppressed lymphatic contraction impair TuDC or lymph node CD169 macrophages acquire tumor antigen and present to T cells. This study is to understand how tumor induced immune tolerance in the draining lymph node during its progression. Aim 3. To determine if ionizing radiation therapy affects tumor lymphatic function and cancer immunity. This study is to understand how radiation therapy changes host immune function. During the project, the student will be directly supervised by a postdoctoral fellow and obtain training in mouse colony maintenance and genotyping, molecular biology, flow cytometry, microscopy and image processing. The student will participate in our weekly joint lab meetings with Dr. Pierre-Yves von der Weid’s lab. At the end of the summer, the student will present his/her work at the lab meeting to obtain feedbacks on the project. Lymph node (LN) metastasis occurs in many tumor types and the presence of cancer cells in the tumor draining LN (TuLN) is a poor prognostic indicator of patient survival/recurrence. Metastatic cancer cells invade lymphatic vessels, traffic through collecting lymphatic vessels and colonize in TuLN. The TuLN functions as a site of cancer metastasis, and as a lymphoid organ to generate immune responses to the primary cancer. However, it is not clear how tumors modulate lymphatic vessels and TuLN immune function to favor their growth and progression. To initiate an effective anti-tumor response, tumor antigen (Ag) or Ag-bearing Tumor dendritic cells (TuDCs) need to traffic through lymphatic vessel to TuLN to prime T cell responses. Collecting lymphatic vessel is the only path delivers Ag or DC to the LN, which is driven by lymphatic pumping. Can tumors alter lymphatic pumping and impair transport of Tumor Ag or TuDCs to TuLN and cause immune tolerance? We developed an intravital imaging model of mouse lymphatic pumping to study molecular and cellular regulation of lymphatic pumping in diseases. Ionizing radiation therapy (IR) is widely used to treat cancer patients. Recent studies have shown IR activated host CD8 T cell responses, which benefit the patients by preventing tumor growth and eradicating metastasis. Can IR changes lymphatic pumping/transport of Tumor Ag or TuDCs to TuLN and boost anti-tumor immunity? Thus, our goal is to study the regulation of lymphatic function and cancer immunity during cancer lymphatic metastasis and IR therapy. The student will design and perform experiments under the guidance of a Postdoctoral Fellow. In addition to his own research project, the student will participate in routine lab activities, including lab meetings and journal clubs. The student will also present his/her research project at the end of the internship. The student should have a strong background in molecular biology and immunology, and have a strong interest in cancer biology. Prior hand-on experience with molecular biology techniques is preferred. The student should have good English skills (both written and verbal communication skills) and an enthusiasm for research and learning. 1 May, 2015 31 August, 2015 University of Calgary – Calgary Alberta Shan Liao 1 0 null English O2 delivery system for tissue engineering, wound healing and organ preservation. Hypoxia and even anoxia are major problems in the engineering of large tissue constructs and during wound healing and implantation, as they induce cell apoptosis and even necrosis. They occur because of the limited oxygen supply to cells and tissues in these situations. Therefore, it is important to find an approach to supply extra oxygen to the cells and tissues to maintain their proper behaviors and functions. Several methods have been developed to deliver oxygen to cells and tissues, such as perfusing oxygenated perfluorocarbons [1], inducing angiogenesis in the tissues[2], and employing in situ oxygen-generating agents [3, 4]. Nevertheless, perfluorocarbons are expensive and often cause side-effects during their applications while inducing angiogenesis is ineffective for large-volume tissues [2]. In situ oxygen-generating agents produce oxygen in H2O and are promising to deliver oxygen to cells. Among the agents, peroxide such as CaO2 has received emphasis from prestigious journals like PNAS and Biomaterials recently [3, 4], revealing its great potential to serve as oxygen supplier for cells and tissues. CaO2 produces oxygen in H2O and is inexpensive. It has been proved to eliminate hypoxia in tissues and sustain cell growth and proliferation [3, 4]. Nevertheless, CaO2 decomposes very fast and results in accumulation of cytotoxic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here, for the first time, we propose to develop a biodegradable oxygen delivery scaffold for tissue engineering with tunable oxygen release rate. We aim to use peroxide as oxygen generating agent and employ hydrophobic biodegradable polymer and biocompatible hydrogel to control oxygen release. The oxygen release rate will be controlled, according to the recorded oxygen release results by a Clark-type electrode in a sealed device. In addition, the material will be investigated for the rescue of bone marrow, adipose tissues and primary human fibroblasts under anoxic environment, a severe culture condition without oxygen. Finally, the impact our O2 release materials will be studied on Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells under anoxia, more O2-sensitive cells. This work will be a great to help eliminating hypoxia in tissue engineering, wound healing and organ storage. This study could also help to gain more and deeper understanding of how oxygen concentration influences cell activities in vitro and improve the technique to build biologically functionally tissues. At McGill University Prof. Barralet is specialized in the modification and processing of biopolymers, immobilization of proteins in and on biomaterials, organic synthesis and have sufficient skills in characterization techniques to assess the O2 releasing system. Dr Barralet is recently appointed Director of Orthopaedic Research at the Dept. Surgery at the Montreal General Hospital. He is Canada Research Chair in Osteoinductive Biomaterials with specific interest in bone regeneration and former President of the Canadian Chapter of the Controlled Release Society. The development of biomaterials with well-controlled temporal peptides release profiles will be a key practical issue as well as their characterization, both of which Professor Barralet is well equipped to assist the project with. Author of over 140 publications, he has wide experience in student supervision and his laboratory is set up for biomaterials characterisation and the zeta sizer and the BET in his laboratory will be extremely useful. The McGill Facility for electron microscopy research offers for the grant proposal Transmission Electron Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy. His new laboratory in the MGH, funded by a Tools for Minimally Invasive Biomaterials CFI will house the 3D printing equipment, 3D scanners, CAD software and equipment for making powders for 3D printing as well as equipment for hard tissue histology. The small animal facility is next door and has recently been equipped with a state of the art digital X ray and CT machine under the same CFI. Our goal is to provide a guided supportive environment for self-motivated learning and where students are encouraged to take responsibility for acquiring their own knowledge. Students are encouraged to develop presentation skills through regular internal and external. Each student will have their own project for which they are responsible. The students will work on the design release systems with tailored degradation properties and test them using in-vitro and in-vivo models. A PhD student in its last year will oversee the day-to-day activities of the students by guiding them trough the development and testing of these biomaterials. The applicant should have keen interest in multidisciplinary work and a strong drive to excel in a competitive international research environment. A background in biotechnology, biomedical engineering, biophysics, physical chemistry, biochemistry or a closely related field is required. Skills in in-vitro cell culture is of advantage. We are seeking full-hearted candidates, hard working, and highly motivated commitment to research with independence and good communication in the English language. 1 January, 2015 1 January, 2015 McGill University – Montréal Québec JAKE BARRALET 1 0 null English Modeling the thermodynamic and physical properties of ternary mixtures of ionic liquids (i.e. room temperature molten salts) Modeling the thermodynamic properties (including phase equilibria) and physical properties of multicomponent systems is of great industrial importance nowadays. The metallurgical and chemical industries commonly use thermochemical packages to simulate chemical reactions and phase equilibria for process development. The thermodynamic and phase equilibrium modeling of multicomponent salt systems consists in expanding the Gibbs energy of a phase as a function of temperature, pressure and composition, and finding a global energy minimum. Model parameters of the Gibbs energy functions are obtained by optimizing their values in order to best reproduce simultaneously the experimental data found in the literature (enthalpy, liquidus, etc.). Parameters form a database and the models are used to predict phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties in the multicomponent system. Models for the density, viscosity and electrical conductivity of multicomponent inorganic molten salts, all linked to the thermodynamic model that gives an estimation of the structure of the melt, were previously developed and applied successfully to inorganic electrolytes such as NaCl-KCl-MgCl2-CaCl2 and NaF-AlF3-CaF2-Al2O3-LiF-MgF2. "Room temperature molten salts" (or "ionic liquids") are involved in numerous potential applications (solvents and catalysts, electrochemistry,…). They are usually composed of a large organic cation and an inorganic anion, and they melt at relatively low temperatures (often below room temperature). Since 2000 the research on “ionic liquids” has grown dramatically and it has focused on the design of single compounds with “tailor-made” properties. As suggested by Plechkova and Seddon, “ionic liquid” ternary mixtures may be considered, where the 1st component would control and define the chemistry of the system, the 2nd component would allow fine tuning of the physical properties (such as density and viscosity) of the system, and the 3rd component would be cheap and inert, thus lowering the global cost of the system. “Ionic liquid” mixtures have been studied relatively little, and most of the existing studies correspond to binary mixtures. The proposed project consists in developing models and databases of parameters for the prediction of phase equilibria (in particular, the liquidus temperature) and physical properties (mainly density and viscosity) of ternary mixtures of the type CX-CY-CZ (where C is a large organic cation such as 1-alkyl-3-methyl-imidazolium, and X, Y and Z are three small anions such as Cl-, NO3- and CH3SO3-). The thermodynamic properties (mainly phase diagram) of the liquid solution will be modeled with the Modified Quasichemical Model in the Pair Approximation. The experimental data necessary for the calibration of the model will be provided by QUILL (Queen’s University Ionic Liquid Laboratories), located in Northern Ireland. Depending on the progress in this project, the density and viscosity of the “ionic liquid” ternary mixtures will also be modeled. (1) One of the 4 senior developers of the FactSage thermochemical system (www.factsage.com) at Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal. FactSage has more than 500 users throughout the world. The developers of FactSage have been awarded the 2012 NSERC Synergy Award for Innovation (Leo Derikx Award) for outstanding achievement of university-industry collaboration. (2) Development of theories of solutions (thermodynamic and physical property models) for inorganic liquids exhibiting very strong atomic ordering, with the impact of this ordering on the physical properties (density, viscosity, ionic conductivity). (3) Development of thermodynamic and physical property models and databases for the Na3AlF6-AlF3-CaF2-Al2O3-LiF-MgF2 system used for the production of Al (in collaboration with Alcoa, Constellium, Hydro Aluminium, Rio Tinto Alcan and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada - NSERC). Calculations of the density, viscosity, ionic conductivity, liquidus, Al2O3 solubility, and of the chemical reactions can be performed in this chemical system. (4) Development of phase equilibrium and thermodynamic models for Al- and Mg-alloys (in collaboration with General Motors, Alcoa, Constellium, Hydro Aluminium, Rio Tinto Alcan and NSERC). This database is used for simulation of alloy processing and solidification. (5) Development of a thermodynamic and phase equilibrium model and database for the major inorganic salts found in the recovery boilers of the pulp and paper industry (black liquor combustion and corrosion). The above-mentioned research project is part of a scientific collaboration between the Center for Research in Computational Thermochemistry (CRCT) from Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal (Canada) and the Queen’s University Ionic Liquid Laboratories (QUILL) from Belfast (UK), having expertises in inorganic salt systems and “ionic liquids”, respectively. The research project will take place in CRCT. CRCT is recognized internationally as one of the major research centers for thermodynamic and phase equilibrium modeling of multicomponent inorganic systems in general and of various liquids such as slags, mattes and molten salts, and for the developments of the FactSage thermochemical software package. Robust models for the physical properties (density, viscosity, electrical conductivity) of inorganic molten salts have also been developed in CRCT. A Master’s project dealing with models for the thermodynamic and physical properties of ternary mixtures of “ionic liquids” is planned to start in January 2015. The MITACS Globalink student will have to interact with this Master’s student. The experimental data necessary for the calibration of the models will be both collected from the scientific literature and provided by QUILL. Depending on the progress in both the Master’s project and the MITACS Globalink project, the following aspects will be studied successively by the two students : - application of methods of estimation such as the Volume-based Thermodynamics (VBT) from Glasser and Jenkins in order to assess the missing thermodynamic data for the three pure compounds of a given ternary system; - thermodynamic model for common-cation ternary “ionic liquid” mixtures using the Modified Quasichemical Model in the Pair Approximation; - density model; - viscosity model. The student needs to have good notions of chemical thermodynamics (Gibbs energy, phase equilibria,…). A good capacity of abstraction is also required since our existing models, successfully applied to the thermodynamic properties, density and viscosity of inorganic molten salt systems, may have to be modified/adapted for the “ionic liquid” ternary mixtures (some modifications are expected to be required especially for our existing viscosity model). Finally, good communication skills are required since the student will have to interact with a Master’s student (see details in the section below). 22 June, 2015 22 September, 2015 École Polytechnique de Montréal – Montréal Québec Patrice Chartrand 0 0 null English Big Data in Environmental Science: Climate and Land use history over the past 15000 years The research project is the general field of environmental data analysis. Through the use of regional case studies, we will investigate the association of past environmental change with human activity. This is done on a continuum from the first arrival of humans in North America through to the arrival of Europeans, to the present. The purpose is to understand the role of human activity in affecting regional to continental-scale land-use patterns in relation to climate changes of the past 15000 years. One component is the analysis of paleoenvironmental data from the NEOTOMA database as well as past populations using CARD. Using regional case studies, we investigate questions such as the following. Do the four components of the terrestrial environment - vegetation, fauna, fire and human populations - change concurrently at the millennial-scale climate transitions identified in many proxy-climate records? Do mammal assemblages change at the same time as vegetation communities? Do charcoal records, indicating fire regime, show transitions associated with millennial-scale climate transitions through the Holocene? How do human population densities, estimated using frequency distributions of archeological radiocarbon dates, compare to those derived from other methods? How did human activity affect North American ecosystems? Are settlement densities associated with changes in fire regime? What was the impact of European settlement on species distribution, land use and carbon dynamics? To what extent are changes in the landscape over the past 500 years, estimated using documentary and other sources, the continuation of those that had been occurring previously? Are recent changes in vegetation distribution different from those occurring pre-settlement? Does millennial-scale climate variability affect migration of taxa? Although many of these questions have been investigated in local studies, in this study we have the opportunity to investigate them at regional to continental scales, and due to the availability of these new databases, objectively using statistical methods. The project is in the general field of the Earth and Environmental Sciences. Within this field, it involves paleoenvironmental analysis, whose purpose is to establish how the climate changed in the past and to suggest possible factors causing the changes. Paleoenvironmental studies are a key component of Earth System Science research, as results have documented considerable variability of scales not knowable from the instrumental record and have led to new insight into the workings of the climate system. It is based on statistical analysis and mapping of environmental and paleoenvironmental data, using data publically available from the literature or from large public databases. These skills learned and used are here applied to environmental data, but the skills are directly transferrable to many kinds of data available from academic, public and private sectors. This research project is concerned with reconstructing past climates and terrestrial environments of the past 20,000 years. The basic data are fossils extracted from lake sediment cores or other geological deposits such as tree-rings, paleolimnological data, etc. These are used to both quantify past climates, and also to determine how these past changes impacted aquatic and freshwater ecosystems. The climate time series developed using these data are further analysed using multivariate and time series methods. Results of paleoenvironmental studies also influence biogeographic thought, as they indicate how populations and ecosystems respond to climate variability. Under the guidance of the professor and graduate students, the student will work on a case study in the general field described above. They will accumulate data from public databases, and reformat the data if necessary for statistical analysis. They will assist graduate students in the case study by preparing data, running programs and plotting results. The will begin by running scripts and programs written for them, and as they become more comfortable with the various methods and software, will run them on their own. They will then discuss the results with the other team members and prepare a presentation of the results. Students with knowledge of ARCGIS will map the data from the various time intervals as part of the analysis. Student should be comfortable working with computers and doing simple data analysis. Analyses will be done in the program “R” and students with experience in Geographic Information Systems, especially ArcGIS, are favoured. We are especially interested in extending the domain of the research from North America southward, so some of the work will involve data from Mexico and Central America; therefore knowledge of Spanish is an asset. 15 May, 2015 14 August, 2015 University of Ottawa – Ottawa Ontario Konrad Gajewski 0 0 null English Spectroscopic studies and instrumentation to enable simultaneous measurements of trace gases The management of greenhouse gas emissions relies on having accurate measurements of their sources, sinks and balance of fluxes and current methods are not providing accurate data about CO2 emissions. The current inaccuracies of the molecular parameters of methane, carbon dioxide will seriously limit the interpretation of spectroscopic remote sensing observations. To remedy this problem, we propose to calibrate their spectroscopic parameters in the 1.66 microns spectral channel. This work is essential to the calibration and interpretation of near-infrared remote sensing spectra of methane and carbon dioxide. Our study will develop quantitative scientific knowledge, robust observations to determine accurately the emissions and uptake of carbon dioxide and methane changes in carbon stocks. It will not reduce emissions of CO2, but it will support long-term quantitative measurements of fluxes, sources, and sinks of CO2 and CH4, will develop forecasts for future trends and will be important to climate research. Our goal is to pursue a complete understanding of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane concentrations through study of carbon sources and sinks and their dynamics. The proposed research activities focus on high resolution molecular spectroscopy: the study of the structure and spectra of molecules of practical importance to the environment, astronomy, and fundamental science by examining the frequencies of light that they absorb and emit. High-resolution molecular spectroscopy in the laboratory is a sophisticated tool for obtaining highly accurate information on the intrinsic properties of gas phase molecules as well as properties resulting from the interaction between molecules. The measured data render possible the analysis of molecular spectra in environments such as the upper layers of the terrestrial atmosphere, interstellar space, the atmospheres of comets and cool stars. Based on the combined information from spectra obtained in the laboratory and those obtained directly from remote objects, the chemical composition of the remote environments, as well as other properties such as the temperature, can be determined. From such information, supplemented by the results of theoretical calculations performed in my lab, we can deepen our knowledge about molecular structures, the dynamical properties of molecules, and the pathways and energetics of molecular reactions. By using the intense and highly collimated light from the synchrotron, we can record spectra with an astonishingly high signal-to-noise ratio in a relatively short time, and this advantage puts us currently in the best position in the world to acquire spectra with resolved rotational structure even from large molecules. • Will work on developing Labview software for a field instrument to measure concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere (N2O, CO2, CH4) • Gain experience in presenting information and group discussion through weekly journal club meetings with research group members • Test field instrument with known amounts of gases to determine its effectiveness and the sensitivity limit • Assist in a spectroscopic study trace atmospheric gases to identify its spectral parameters needed for interpreting atmospheric spectra of Earth or other planets. • Operate the laser-based, home made laboratory instrument to record spectra of of atmospheric gases under various temperatures and pressures to model what the spectra might look like in different atmospheric conditions • Use Labview based computer programs for processing the spectra and retrieving the spectral line parameters of interest • Willingness to learn • Follow directions well • Organized • Team member • Communicate ideas well • Responsible • Creative • Flexible • Willingness to travel • Hardworking • Data analysis through Microsoft Excel • Academic writing • Use of Microsoft Office • Knowledge of Labview, or Mathematica or Matlab would be useful 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of Lethbridge – Lethbridge Alberta ADRIANA PREDOI-CROSS 0 0 null English Spectroscopic Studies of Short Lived Atmospheric Molecules An important result of laboratory spectroscopic research is the compilation of spectroscopic databases (HITRAN, GEISA) containing information about spectral line positions, intensities and line shapes, aimed at facilitating the analysis of spectra from remote environments. Ongoing technological developments produce "remote" spectra of increasingly higher quality. Analysis and interpretation of these improved "remote" spectra call for a substantial increase in the amount and quality of spectroscopic database information. In order to supply laboratory/theoretical data required for the accurate retrieval of the concentration profiles, we will carry out accurate measurements of absolute line intensities for a number of molecules of great atmospheric relevance, namely nitric acid (HNO3), formic acid (HCOOH), chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) and HOI. This undertaking is most challenging because of the chemical instability of these species and the fact that combinations of various experimental techniques and theoretical modeling, including ab initio calculations, are required to reach the goal. Supersonic jet facilities coupled to Fourier transform spectroscopic detection will be used to help in the analysis of the spectra of heavy molecules, the low temperatures reached in the jet leading to a strong simplification of the spectra( disparition of hot bands, lines with high rotational quantum numbers,...). Line intensities will be measured and analyzed using intensity reference data provided by other techniques, to retrieve molecular abundances. Such experiments elucidate the formation of dimers that might interfere with the quantitative characterization of monomers, in particular for formic acid HCOOH. With access to a state-of-the-art facility (CLS) and a novel spectroscopic analysis, the spectroscopic parameters resulting from this will enable more accurate modeling of radiative transfer in our atmosphere. Our results will be i) presented at planetary science and molecular spectroscopy conferences, ii) published in peer-reviewed journals, and iii) included in appropriate databases. The proposed novel experimental methods can be expanded in the future to enable the spectroscopic study of atmospheric molecules that are very short lived. The successful completion of such a project would build on the methods proposed here and require three experimental techniques to be combined: Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, diode laser spectroscopy, and Stark effect spectroscopy in the microwave region. The proposed research activities focus on high resolution molecular spectroscopy: the study of the structure and spectra of molecules of practical importance to the environment, astronomy, and fundamental science by examining the frequencies of light that they absorb and emit. High-resolution molecular spectroscopy in the laboratory is a sophisticated tool for obtaining highly accurate information on the intrinsic properties of gas phase molecules as well as properties resulting from the interaction between molecules. The measured data render possible the analysis of molecular spectra in environments such as the upper layers of the terrestrial atmosphere, interstellar space, the atmospheres of comets and cool stars. Based on the combined information from spectra obtained in the laboratory and those obtained directly from remote objects, the chemical composition of the remote environments, as well as other properties such as the temperature, can be determined. From such information, supplemented by the results of theoretical calculations performed in my lab, we can deepen our knowledge about molecular structures, the dynamical properties of molecules, and the pathways and energetics of molecular reactions. By using the intense and highly collimated light from the synchrotron, we can record spectra with an astonishingly high signal-to-noise ratio in a relatively short time, and this advantage puts us currently in the best position in the world to acquire spectra with resolved rotational structure even from large molecules. • Assist in a spectroscopic study trace atmospheric gases to identify its spectral parameters needed for interpreting atmospheric spectra of Earth or other planets. • Operate the laser-based, home made laboratory instrument to record spectra of of atmospheric gases under various temperatures and pressures to model what the spectra might look like in different atmospheric conditions • Use Labview based computer programs for processing the spectra and retrieving the spectral line parameters of interest • Gain experience in presenting information and group discussion through weekly journal club meetings with research group members • Data analysis through Microsoft Excel • Academic writing • Use of Microsoft Office • Willingness to learn • Follow directions well • Organized • Team member • Communicate ideas well • Responsible • Creative • Flexible • Programming skills are an asset • Hardworking 1 May, 2015 1 May, 2015 University of Lethbridge – Lethbridge Alberta ADRIANA PREDOI-CROSS 0 0 null French Intégration régionale de la prévention et de la gestion des maladies chroniques cardio-métaboliques Étant donné la prévalence élevée des MCCM et les bénéfices de leur prise en charge, ces conditions devraient être ciblées pour une prise en charge intégrée dans un contexte de soins de 1ère ligne. Ce projet vise le développement, l’implantation et l’évaluation d’un modèle régional intégré de prévention et de gestion des maladies chroniques cardio-métaboliques (MCCM) impliquant les ressources de 1ère ligne des Centres de santé et services sociaux (CSSS) et des groupes de médecine familiale (GMF) de l’Estrie et les ressources spécialisées du Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke (CHUS). Les MCCM sont des conditions reliées par leur pathophysiologie commune et la nécessité d’interventions d’optimisation des habitudes de vie (HV) et d’autogestion pour leur prévention et leur prise en charge (obésité, dyslipidémies, diabète, HTA, maladies cardio-vasculaires (MCV)). Nous utiliserons un devis de recherche participative et une méthodologie mixte avec des évaluations qualitatives et quantitatives et un devis pré-post. Le projet sera préalablement approuvé par les Comités d'éthique appropriés, et les participants devront signer un consentement éclairé. Nous évaluerons dans un premier temps de façon rétrospective la situation pré-implantation des Cadres de référence diabète (2009) et réadaptation cardiaque (2011) avec les éléments disponibles. Nous effectuerons une comparaison pré-implantation vs 1 an post-implantation du Cadre de référence MCCM à l’aide d’une variété d’outils de mesure : a) Indicateurs de performance génériques et spécifiques, tel que suggéré par le groupe de travail de l’INESS (2012), grâce aux données administratives, à la banque CIRESS, et à la revue de dossiers-patients du CHUS et des CSSS/GMFs (nb de patients référés/traités, temps d’attente, nb de nouveaux cas, sévérité des cas, indicateurs cliniques (A1C, IMC, counselling etc.)); b) Questionnaire de concordance des soins vs le modèle de gestion des maladies chroniques pour les professionnels et les patients; iii) Questionnaires évaluant la perception des professionnels de la santé de la prévention et gestion des MCCM et leur compétence pour la prise en charge des MCCM, et la perception et satisfaction des patients; iv) Entrevues de groupe auprès de professionnels de la santé, gestionnaires et patients des CSSS/GMFs et du CHUS afin d’évaluer le processus d’implantation, les difficultés rencontrées et solutions apportées, l’acceptabilité du nouveau modèle et la satisfaction. Tous les professionnels (infirmières, nutritionnistes, kinésiologues, médecins) impliqués dans les CSSS/GMFs, hors-GMF et au CHUS seront sollicités afin de participer aux évaluations et nous sélectionnerons au hasard un groupe de patients dans chacun des milieux pour la revue de leur dossier ainsi que pour répondre aux questionnaires et participer aux entrevues. Depuis 2001, Dr Marie-France Langlois a initié la mise sur pied d’une équipe interdisciplinaire intéressée aux interventions cliniques, à la recherche et à l'enseignement visant la modification des habitudes de vie et la prise en charge de la clientèle obèse. L'équipe de recherche a réalisé plusieurs études afin d’évaluer l’efficacité de cette approche particulièrement chez les sujets avec syndrome métabolique dans un contexte de prévention du diabète. Un autre intérêt de l’équipe est d’étudier les modalités d’intervention optimales et l'intégration des soins médicaux et chirurgicaux pour les sujets avec une obésité sévère et qui sont éligibles à la chirurgie bariatrique. Des outils de prédiction de la réponse aux interventions de modification des habitudes de vie chez cette clientèle sont également en développement. L'équipe s'intéresse aussi à l'impact de l'activité physique pendant la période précédant la chirurgie bariatrique. Présentement, les intérêts de recherche de l'équipe touchent la prévention et la gestion des maladies chroniques cardio-métaboliques à l'intérieur du continuum de soins (1ère /2e/3e ligne - voir description du projet de recherche). Notre équipe est composée de plusieurs endocrinologues, de nutritionnistes, de kinésiologues, d'assistants de recherche et de nombreux étudiants gradués ayant tous un intérêt pour l'amélioration des services de santé. De plus, nous comptons parmi nos collaborateurs des chirurgiennes bariatriques, des médecins de famille, des infirmières et des psychologues. Selon l'avancement du projet, l'étudiant sera impliqué dans la collecte de données dans les dossiers patients ou par questionnaires. Il pourra aussi s'impliquer dans la saisie de données des dossiers patients et/ou des questionnaires de l'évaluation pré-implantation. Il pourra participer aux analyses préliminaires des données et à la rédaction de résumés pour les conférences scientifiques. L'étudiant aura aussi la chance d'être exposé aux travaux des autres étudiants de l'équipe et d'assister aux réunions d'avancement du projet. L'étudiant doit avoir étudié en sciences de la santé et être très en l'aise en français puisque le projet se déroule en français. L'étudiant doit être rigoureux et posséder une bonne connaissance de la suite Office. Celui-ci doit